CCD vs interpolated

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Richard Bornstein, Mar 24, 2005.

  1. What is the difference? If it is advertized a certain MP, I have always
    assumed CCD is more accurate, but don't know what the difference is.
    Thanks
    Richard Bornstein, Mar 24, 2005
    #1
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  2. Richard Bornstein <> wrote:
    : What is the difference? If it is advertized a certain MP, I have always
    : assumed CCD is more accurate, but don't know what the difference is.
    : Thanks

    I may be wrong, but I think you are talking two different things here. A
    CCD is a device that captures light intensity levels at specific
    locations. Interpolated is not a device but a process. I believe it is
    generally a way to double the number of pixels of a photo file by
    compairing the output of two adjacent pixels (picture elements), which
    could be captured by a CCD element, and creating an interpreted pixel to
    go inbetween. So one side of your equasion is a device and the other is a
    process.

    Now as to which is best, IMHO, a direct measuring of the image pixels
    would seem to be more accurate than a computer process "imagining" a
    proportion of the image elements. Most of the time when I have seen
    "Interpolated" it has been in relation to a scanner. By only having half
    as many image sensors as the final image would require, the cost is
    reduced. Sometimes with film scanners, some form of interpolation may be
    present as the miniaturization of the optics can create a limit on the
    number and size of image elements sensed. Eventually the cost of
    increasing the number of sampled points vs the cost of that increase
    becomes prohibitive.

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, Mar 24, 2005
    #2
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  3. In article <>,
    "Richard Bornstein" <> wrote:

    > What is the difference? If it is advertized a certain MP, I have always
    > assumed CCD is more accurate, but don't know what the difference is.
    > Thanks


    Is this regarding Fuji's magic sensor shapes that defy physics and
    double the resolution?

    Look for "effective pixels" of the sensor. That's how many sensor
    points are actually in use. The lens quality matters a lot too because
    plenty of 8MP cameras are so blurry that they offer nothing more than
    their 4MP predecessors.
    Kevin McMurtrie, Mar 24, 2005
    #3
  4. Richard Bornstein

    Rick Guest

    Richard Bornstein wrote:
    > What is the difference? If it is advertized a certain MP, I have always
    > assumed CCD is more accurate, but don't know what the difference is.
    > Thanks


    Its the native resolution of the CCD that counts, interpolation just gives
    you big files - and you can do that yourself in photoshop if you really
    have to.

    Think of it in the same way as optical vs digital zoom.

    --

    Rick

    Digital Printing
    www.intelligence-direct.com - 01270 215550
    Rick, Mar 24, 2005
    #4
  5. Richard Bornstein

    Guest

    Right now there are three kinds of sensors used in digital cameras.
    CCD devices capture photons and read them out as a long string of
    buckets as in a bucket brigade. To get color, the individual cells
    are covered with red, green and blue (transmitting) filters.
    CMOS devices capture photons and read them out like SRAM, one
    storage location at a time. To get color, the individual cells
    are covered with red, green and blue (transmitting) filters.
    Foveon devices capture photons and read them out like SRAM,
    one storage location at a time. To get color, the individual cells
    have three different wells under the photon capture area. The lowest
    energy photons (red) are captured in the top layer, the mid-energy
    photons are captured in the middle layer, and the high energy
    photons are captured deeper in the 3rd layer. Each layer can be
    accessed individually.

    CCD and CMOS color sensors need to be processed by an algorithm
    that performs demoasicing (AKA interpolation). There are at least
    22 different algorithms that perform this Bayer interpolation. Some
    are better than others on one kind of imaging, others better on other
    kinds of imaging. Almost everyone agrees that the pictures comming
    out of Bayer sensors are top notch.

    The Foveon sensors do not need this demosaicing processing, but they
    need a different color-discrimination process to obtain nice RGB
    colors.
    Most people can agree that well exposed Foveon images are top notch.

    Where the disagreement lies is with shadow level detail where many
    see that CCD and CMOS sensors have better shadow level detail
    due in part to the spectral sensitivity differences between the filter
    model of CCD/CMOS verusus the energy level discriminatioon of the
    Foveons.
    , Mar 24, 2005
    #5
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