CatOS practice

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by J R, Sep 11, 2004.

  1. J R

    J R Guest

    I've motstly worked with Cisco IOS in the past; just a little here and there
    with CatOS. I need to get intimately familiar with CatOS now and am looking
    for something I can use for practice.

    I have a Cat2950 available to me, but only IOS is available for that device.
    Does anybody know of any training alternatives to having an actual switch
    with CatOS?

    TIA,
    J R
     
    J R, Sep 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. J R

    Ben Guest

    It's slowly being phased out so getting less and less relevant...
    Why do you need to learn it? If you're going to be working on a specific
    platform why not get hold of one of those?


    "J R" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I've motstly worked with Cisco IOS in the past; just a little here and

    there
    > with CatOS. I need to get intimately familiar with CatOS now and am

    looking
    > for something I can use for practice.
    >
    > I have a Cat2950 available to me, but only IOS is available for that

    device.
    > Does anybody know of any training alternatives to having an actual switch
    > with CatOS?
    >
    > TIA,
    > J R
    >
    >
     
    Ben, Sep 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. J R

    micke Guest

    well there is a lot of platforms that will support cat os like
    catalyst 6000 and the older 5000 but also 2948 is a nice one to work
    with. (get em cheap on ebay)

    ps its nice to run cat os on the 6000 if you are doing redundancy
    works mutch better and faster that current IOS

    /micke

    "J R" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > I've motstly worked with Cisco IOS in the past; just a little here and there
    > with CatOS. I need to get intimately familiar with CatOS now and am looking
    > for something I can use for practice.
    >
    > I have a Cat2950 available to me, but only IOS is available for that device.
    > Does anybody know of any training alternatives to having an actual switch
    > with CatOS?
    >
    > TIA,
    > J R
     
    micke, Sep 13, 2004
    #3
  4. Hello, micke!
    You wrote on 13 Sep 2004 15:24:44 -0700:

    m> ps its nice to run cat os on the 6000 if you are doing redundancy
    m> works mutch better and faster that current IOS

    Not anymore. SSO redundancy in Native IOS literally blows away Hybrid HA.

    With best regards,
    Andrey.
     
    Andrey Tarasov, Sep 14, 2004
    #4
  5. J R

    Hansang Bae Guest

    In article <ebf1d.29460$>,
    says...
    > It's slowly being phased out so getting less and less relevant...
    > Why do you need to learn it? If you're going to be working on a specific
    > platform why not get hold of one of those?



    It will be a *LONG* time before CatOS becomes a moot point. If you want
    to work on Cisco gear, you better know CatOS.


    --

    hsb

    "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    *************** USE ROT13 TO SEE MY EMAIL ADDRESS ****************
    ********************************************************************
    Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    ********************************************************************
     
    Hansang Bae, Sep 14, 2004
    #5
  6. J R

    Eliot Guest

    Interesting....... I just don't have the funds to buy a 3550 right now so
    was considering getting a 5500 (probably 5509 for space) to work on for my
    switching exam. The opportunity to get MLS and ATM functionality in one box
    looks like a sweet deal. A standalone chassis looks cheap enough but it
    looks like the RMS modules are still attracting a premium and along with
    lightstream blades and SupIII, it could still work out quite pricey.

    I've been doing a bit of research but having little experience of larger
    switches am wondering if this would be a good buy for lab/cert purposes.
    What would be the ideal setup in a 5500 chassis (for a lab) and is it worth
    it?

    Comments appreciated.


    "Hansang Bae" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <ebf1d.29460$>,
    > says...
    > > It's slowly being phased out so getting less and less relevant...
    > > Why do you need to learn it? If you're going to be working on a specific
    > > platform why not get hold of one of those?

    >
    >
    > It will be a *LONG* time before CatOS becomes a moot point. If you want
    > to work on Cisco gear, you better know CatOS.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > hsb
    >
    > "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    > *************** USE ROT13 TO SEE MY EMAIL ADDRESS ****************
    > ********************************************************************
    > Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    > reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    > ********************************************************************
     
    Eliot, Sep 15, 2004
    #6
  7. J R

    Hansang Bae Guest

    In article <414785d8$0$826$>,
    says...
    > Interesting....... I just don't have the funds to buy a 3550 right now so
    > was considering getting a 5500 (probably 5509 for space) to work on for my
    > switching exam. The opportunity to get MLS and ATM functionality in one box
    > looks like a sweet deal. A standalone chassis looks cheap enough but it
    > looks like the RMS modules are still attracting a premium and along with
    > lightstream blades and SupIII, it could still work out quite pricey.
    >
    > I've been doing a bit of research but having little experience of larger
    > switches am wondering if this would be a good buy for lab/cert purposes.
    > What would be the ideal setup in a 5500 chassis (for a lab) and is it worth
    > it?



    I don't think you need an RSM card. As far as MLS is concerned, there
    isn't much to configure so that too isn't worth worrying about - other
    than knowing what's involved/how it works. ATM card requires that you
    have an ATM device to play with....besides, ATM isn't going anywhere.


    --

    hsb

    "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    *************** USE ROT13 TO SEE MY EMAIL ADDRESS ****************
    ********************************************************************
    Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    ********************************************************************
     
    Hansang Bae, Sep 17, 2004
    #7
  8. J R

    Eliot Guest

    You clearly have much more experience than me in the networking world so I
    respect your opinions. Having said that, ATM is still the primary technology
    used for DSLAM aggregation and I can't see that changing for a while yet.

    I had considered trying to pick up an ATM enabled 5000 and maybe a
    Lightstream 1010 on the cheap, to set up an ATM backbone in my lab. I have
    taken your comments on board though and perhaps I would be better off just
    getting a cheap 5000 to learn CatOS and the time that I would have spent on
    ATM may be better served getting to grips with MPLS instead.

    Thanks



    "Hansang Bae" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <414785d8$0$826$>,
    > says...
    > > Interesting....... I just don't have the funds to buy a 3550 right now

    so
    > > was considering getting a 5500 (probably 5509 for space) to work on for

    my
    > > switching exam. The opportunity to get MLS and ATM functionality in one

    box
    > > looks like a sweet deal. A standalone chassis looks cheap enough but it
    > > looks like the RMS modules are still attracting a premium and along with
    > > lightstream blades and SupIII, it could still work out quite pricey.
    > >
    > > I've been doing a bit of research but having little experience of larger
    > > switches am wondering if this would be a good buy for lab/cert purposes.
    > > What would be the ideal setup in a 5500 chassis (for a lab) and is it

    worth
    > > it?

    >
    >
    > I don't think you need an RSM card. As far as MLS is concerned, there
    > isn't much to configure so that too isn't worth worrying about - other
    > than knowing what's involved/how it works. ATM card requires that you
    > have an ATM device to play with....besides, ATM isn't going anywhere.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > hsb
    >
    > "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    > *************** USE ROT13 TO SEE MY EMAIL ADDRESS ****************
    > ********************************************************************
    > Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    > reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    > ********************************************************************
     
    Eliot, Sep 18, 2004
    #8
  9. J R

    Hansang Bae Guest

    In article <414c4925$0$21459$>,
    says...
    > You clearly have much more experience than me in the networking world so I
    > respect your opinions. Having said that, ATM is still the primary technology
    > used for DSLAM aggregation and I can't see that changing for a while yet.
    >
    > I had considered trying to pick up an ATM enabled 5000 and maybe a
    > Lightstream 1010 on the cheap, to set up an ATM backbone in my lab. I have
    > taken your comments on board though and perhaps I would be better off just
    > getting a cheap 5000 to learn CatOS and the time that I would have spent on
    > ATM may be better served getting to grips with MPLS instead.


    I would go with MPLS over ATM any day. Unless you want to work for a
    carrier, DSLAMs won't come into play much. Having said that...here's an
    old article I saved:



    How to add ATM to your CCIE lab cheap, Brian Feeny CCIE #8036
    --------------------------------------------------------------
    Wanting to add ATM to your lab? Do it cheap! Yes it can be done
    expensivly or cheaply, both are actually kind of expensive, but very
    different costs:


    Typically the first reaction to add ATM is to run out and buy a
    Lightstream 1010. You don't need to do this. You can practice with
    just about any ATM switch out there, Bay, Nortel, etc. Even cheap $200
    ones. Its good to use MultiMode OC3 interfaces since thats what your
    going to find on most routers used for labs.


    For those of you hardcore people wanting a Lightstream, be prepared
    to pay at least $2500 minimum. You will need a Chassis, an ASP, and
    at least 1 CAM and a few PAMs. The cheapest you can do is:


    L1010 Chassis
    L1010-ASP-B-FC1 ASP module
    WATM-CAM-2P 2-port carrier module
    WAI-OC3-4MM 4-port OC3 interface


    The above is probably $2500 minimum, probably more like $4000, and about
    $1200 of it is in the chassis alone! One way to cut costs is to use a
    5509 or 5513 catalyst. On these switches, the last 4 slots have
    packetized backplanes and are essentially L1010 chassis (last 5 slots).
    You can usually get a 5509 and use it both as your cat5k switch and your
    l1010 ATM switch! saves a little money.


    Now, the downside is the switch is the cheapest part anyways :). The
    real
    cost of adding ATM to your lab is in the routers.


    Most people want to go for the throat, and run out and buy modules for
    2600 or 3600 series. This is when they find the NM-1A-OC3MM modules.
    These modules cost $2500.00 on the used market! Thats $5000 just for 2
    modules, and you still need a switch and cables and cant do full mesh!


    Another alternative is to use older 7000 series routers. The 7000 is
    the
    7-slot version and the 7010 is the 5-slot version. Cards are cheap for
    these and easy to pick up. You can add 4 or 8 port serial cards, 2/4/6
    port ethernet, 2/4 port token ring, hssi, atm, etc. These routers were
    backbone routers not too long ago. The downside of the 7000 series is
    they only goto IOS 11.2. Now for things like frame switching and ATM
    you
    can still do alot of stuff up to 11.2, including CLIP, SVC, PVC, etc.
    And
    of course you can still get alot of life out of a router like this as a
    frame switch and basic multiprotocol beast doing some ospf/bgp/etc.
    Since
    token and ethernet cards are so cheap (example: a 6-port ethernet card
    might run you as cheap as $125), you can use it for DLSW and all kinds
    of
    bridging (SRT/SRB/etc).


    They make Fast Ethernet blades for these routers as well, so you can do
    VLAN's form them. CX-FEIP-1TX, CX-FEIP-2TX, CX-FEIP2-1TX, CX-FEIP2-2TX.
    Sure they are expensive for FastEthernet though, about $800-$1200
    generally to add a 1 or 2 port blade, but I have some more tips below to
    possibly make that cheaper!


    When Cisco had the 7000 series, the routing and switching functions
    (routing and switching of packets) was broken down into 2 seperate
    cards:
    The Route Processor (called the RP) and the Switch Processor (called the
    SP). Cisco made 2 versions of the RP, the standard RP which had 16MB of
    memory and then RP64, which had 64MB of memory. For the switch
    processor,
    Cisco offered a 500k version and a 2MB version. Also cisco offered a
    version of the switch processor called the Silicon Switch Processor
    which
    could do a new and faster form of switching called silicon switching.


    These were the kings, and life was good. 7000 reigned for a long time
    and
    was quite usefull. But then Cisco came out with a new series, called
    the
    7500 series. For this they used the same chassis as the 7000 series!
    The
    5 slot version of the 7500 was called the 7505, and the 7 slot version
    was
    called the 7507.


    Instead of using an RP and SP, the 7500 series used one card. This was
    called the RSP. You see they combined the Routing and Switching
    function
    into 1 card, instead of having 2 seperate cards. The first card was
    called the RSP1 (later came the RSP2, RSP4, and RSP8). The RSP1 could
    goto 128MB and had the ability to take PCMCIA cards.


    7500 series were not restricted to the full sized blades of the 7000
    either. They created a module called a VIP (Versatile Interface
    Processor), and a VIP had 2 slots on it. Inside a VIP you could install
    a
    port adapter (PA). The VIP had its own memory and processor. So you
    buy
    putting VIP's in your router, you can have a more distributed setup,
    with
    memory, and processor handled by the VIP. Inside a VIP you could stick
    say
    1 FastEthernet PA (PA-FE-TX) and 1 ATM PA (PA-A1-OC3MM).........so it
    allowed you to get more milage out of your slots. Those same PA's are
    the
    ones that work in the 7200 series, like the 7206. The 7200 series
    became
    a VIP-less platform, where the VIP is built into the chassis and all you
    need is the PA's.


    Cisco started making the later 7000 modules compatible with the new 7500
    series. They did this so that peoples investment would be protected if
    they ever wanted to upgrade to a 7500 they would not have to go and buy
    all new cards. So the later revisions of most 7000 series cards are
    7500
    compatible. If you ever want to see if your cards are 7500 compatible
    you
    can check CCO (serach for "75000 compatibility").


    Ok, so the 7000 people had a path to migrate to a 7500 series, and would
    only have to buy the new chassis. Even the power supplies from a 7000
    would fit into a 7507, and the power supplies from a 7010 would work on
    a
    7505............it looked like cisco was doing something good by
    providing
    the path.


    The people with the 7000's were not 100% happy though. There equipment,
    including there RP's were being End Of Lifed, and IOS support was going
    to
    stop with 11.2. Cisco decided to come out with a replacement module for
    the RP, called the RSP7000. The RSP7000 is very much like an RSP1. It
    can run the LATEST IOS images. Even better it would allow the 7000
    series
    to use cards especally designed just for the 7500's..........like the
    VIP's and the PA's that go inside them.


    The RSP7000 went in the SP slot, and the RP slot would be empty, but
    Cisco
    also developed a RSP7000CI card to go into that slot. This card IMHO
    was
    just a marketing gimmick. "What do we tell people to do with the empty
    slot?", "I know! We'll make a card a tell them they need it!" So cisco
    makes this RSP7000CI card, which is practically a bare circuit card, but
    has a few chips on it. Its job we are told is to monitor the
    temparature
    of the RSP7000 processor to prevent overheating. In all documentation
    they say you must have this card to use an RSP7000, the truth is you
    don't. I have run many RSP7000's without this RSP7000CI card. The
    RSP7000CI can be hard to find as well, and usually fetches about $500
    when
    you do find it.


    So where am I going with this?


    If you buy a 7010 with an RP / SP, you have a good router than can use
    cheap interfaces (frame switch, ATM) but can only goto IOS 11.2. Still
    a
    good deal, especially if you only spent a few hundred bucks, or even
    $1250
    with ATM and the works.


    but if you stick a RSP7000 into a 7000 series router, you just turned it
    into a 7500. yes a 7500. You can use all the cards of the 7500, the
    latest IOS just like the 7500, and all you suffer from is that you have
    half the backplane speed (like 622MBps instead of 1.2Gbs). You can use
    the same PA's and VIP's out there just like 7200's and 7500's.


    You can add a FastEthernet PA to a 7000 with RSP7000 installed for $250
    if
    you find a good deal! ATM for $250-300, 4-port serial cards for $125!


    In short you have created an IOS 12.2 capable router, with lots of
    slots,
    that can do lots of cool stuff for not so much money.


    Think about this.............remember those 2600/3600 ATM modules the
    NM-1A-OC3MM's? They were $2500 each.......just for the module, not
    counting the cost of the router. Now look at this rough estimate of
    what
    it might cost to get a 7000 series enhanced router:


    7010 $400
    RP $100
    SP $100
    ATM $300


    So $900.00, thats like 1/3rd the cost of just the module alone in a
    3600!


    Now you say you cant goto IOS 12.2 etc, well consider this:


    7010 $400
    RSP7000 $1000
    VIP2-20 $250
    PA-A1-OC3MM $500


    $2150, and you have everything a 3600 could dream to be and more.
    Cheaper
    modules, ATM, etc. You could add fastethernet to the above for about
    $300
    more! $2150 barely buys you a 3640 chassis.


    A 3640 can do voice, it does have that over a 7000 series, however, I
    will
    post about making router selection for voice in a future posting.


    $1000-$2000 is alot to spend for routers, I agree. But if your going to
    have to spend that much, to get ATM, or FastEthernet or what have you.
    Make those dollars count, consider a 7000 series vs. 3600 series.


    If anyone would like to discuss any of these options further, contact me
    off list. I move alot of 7000 series gear, both RSP7000 enabled and
    not.


    Brian



    --

    hsb

    "Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
    *************** USE ROT13 TO SEE MY EMAIL ADDRESS ****************
    ********************************************************************
    Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
    reply to emails sent to my account. Please post a followup instead.
    ********************************************************************
     
    Hansang Bae, Sep 19, 2004
    #9
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