Can't figure out simple routing between 2 Windows domains

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Chris Allen, Sep 3, 2007.

  1. Chris Allen

    Chris Allen Guest

    I apologize for such a newbie question, but I'm not a routing person
    but because of staffing issues and some stringent time pressures I
    have to implement this myself.

    I'm lost on how to get a very simple routing setup working for 2
    Windows domains. The first domain is domain1.com on subnet
    192.168.1.0/24 and is on the 1st floor of the building, on the second
    floor I have domain2.com with a subnet of 192.168.2.0/24. The two
    networks are physically connected with a single ethernet cable. I
    have set up a trust relationship between the two domains, but I can't
    figure out how to make it work.

    At first I thought I could just directly connect each switch in each
    network together with the cable running between them. But this didn't
    work because the computers on the two domains are on different
    subnets. So now I'm thinking all I need is a router with a static
    routing table set up. I'm not sure how to set this up or if this is
    the correct solution. Merging the two subnets is not an option
    either... I'm confused on how to do a routing setup that would work,
    and all of the examples on the internet I can find with static routes
    show two routers, one on each network. Do I have to have 2 routers to
    do this? It seems excessive for such a simple setup, and I'm very
    tight on money at the moment. Also I don't need any kind of fancy
    firewalling between the networks, I want all traffic destined for one
    to transparently be routed to the other and vice versa. Any kind of
    help would be appreciated. Thanks.
    Chris Allen, Sep 3, 2007
    #1
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  2. Chris Allen

    Merv Guest

    A single router with two Ethernet / FastEthernet interfaces will
    suffice - one interface cabled to each switch.

    All PC will have need to have their IP default gateway configured
    properly in order to send "off-net" packets to the router for
    forwarding.

    Since both subnets will be connected to the same router you should not
    require any static routes as the router will have an IP address
    assignment in each subnet and thus will know how to reach the two
    subnets.

    You could try starting out with a Windows-based PC into which you
    install an extra Ethernet NIC and then enable IP routing.
    Merv, Sep 3, 2007
    #2
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  3. Chris Allen wrote:
    > I apologize for such a newbie question, but I'm not a routing person
    > but because of staffing issues and some stringent time pressures I
    > have to implement this myself.
    >
    > I'm lost on how to get a very simple routing setup working for 2
    > Windows domains. The first domain is domain1.com on subnet
    > 192.168.1.0/24 and is on the 1st floor of the building, on the second
    > floor I have domain2.com with a subnet of 192.168.2.0/24. The two
    > networks are physically connected with a single ethernet cable. I
    > have set up a trust relationship between the two domains, but I can't
    > figure out how to make it work.
    >
    > At first I thought I could just directly connect each switch in each
    > network together with the cable running between them. But this didn't
    > work because the computers on the two domains are on different
    > subnets. So now I'm thinking all I need is a router with a static
    > routing table set up. I'm not sure how to set this up or if this is
    > the correct solution. Merging the two subnets is not an option
    > either... I'm confused on how to do a routing setup that would work,
    > and all of the examples on the internet I can find with static routes
    > show two routers, one on each network. Do I have to have 2 routers to
    > do this? It seems excessive for such a simple setup, and I'm very
    > tight on money at the moment. Also I don't need any kind of fancy
    > firewalling between the networks, I want all traffic destined for one
    > to transparently be routed to the other and vice versa. Any kind of
    > help would be appreciated. Thanks.
    >

    You need one router with an interface in each network.

    As the link is ethernet, this could be as simple as adding a network
    card to one of the windows box and joining the two subnets/switches (and
    ethernet segments) at that box, giving each card an IP in the right
    network, and turning on routing. That's a pretty nasty way to do it, but
    sosts very little, and should be easy. You then set the default gateway
    of each subnet to be the IP of the windows box.

    Alternatively, if the switches you have have the required software, you
    could turn on routing on one switch- but that's a bit harder if you
    don't know how to do it, and relies on you having capable software.
    Chris Bartram, Sep 3, 2007
    #3
  4. Chris Allen

    Merv Guest

    OBTW what is the make and model of the two Ethernet switches ?
    Merv, Sep 3, 2007
    #4
  5. Chris Allen

    Chris Allen Guest

    Thanks for the response. In my case both networks also have their own
    internet connections, which is the default gateway on each host on
    each network.

    So in order for a PC on 192.168.1.0 to talk to a PC on 192.168.2.0
    with the router having address' 192.168.1.62 and 192.168.2.62 I'd add
    a static route like so?:

    add route 192.168.2.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.62

    I've got an Allied Telesyn AR-410 router that should do the routing.
    But, why would the router just magically forward packets from one
    network to the other? Just because it's multihomed it will
    automatically route packets from net1 on nic1 and net2 on nic2? This
    is what is really confusing to me... From looking at the manual it
    seems to be that case that to enable routing you need to enable RIP,
    or OSPF, BGP, or add static routing entries.

    On Sep 3, 8:05 am, Merv <> wrote:
    > A single router with two Ethernet / FastEthernet interfaces will
    > suffice - one interface cabled to each switch.
    >
    > All PC will have need to have their IP default gateway configured
    > properly in order to send "off-net" packets to the router for
    > forwarding.
    >
    > Since both subnets will be connected to the same router you should not
    > require any static routes as the router will have an IP address
    > assignment in each subnet and thus will know how to reach the two
    > subnets.
    >
    > You could try starting out with a Windows-based PC into which you
    > install an extra Ethernet NIC and then enable IP routing.
    Chris Allen, Sep 3, 2007
    #5
  6. Chris Allen

    Chris Allen Guest


    > You need one router with an interface in each network.
    >
    > As the link is ethernet, this could be as simple as adding a network
    > card to one of the windows box and joining the two subnets/switches (and
    > ethernet segments) at that box, giving each card an IP in the right
    > network, and turning on routing. That's a pretty nasty way to do it, but
    > sosts very little, and should be easy. You then set the default gateway
    > of each subnet to be the IP of the windows box.
    >
    > Alternatively, if the switches you have have the required software, you
    > could turn on routing on one switch- but that's a bit harder if you
    > don't know how to do it, and relies on you having capable software.


    Thanks. I do have a router so I'm going to try and use it. But this
    is very handy information in case I need a fallback plan. Thanks
    again.
    Chris Allen, Sep 3, 2007
    #6
  7. Chris Allen wrote:
    > Thanks for the response. In my case both networks also have their own
    > internet connections, which is the default gateway on each host on
    > each network.
    >
    > So in order for a PC on 192.168.1.0 to talk to a PC on 192.168.2.0
    > with the router having address' 192.168.1.62 and 192.168.2.62 I'd add
    > a static route like so?:
    >
    > add route 192.168.2.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.62
    >

    No, no need. If the router has an address in 192.168.1.x and
    192.168.2.x, and the PCs have that as it's default gateway, it'll just work.

    > I've got an Allied Telesyn AR-410 router that should do the routing.
    > But, why would the router just magically forward packets from one
    > network to the other? Just because it's multihomed it will
    > automatically route packets from net1 on nic1 and net2 on nic2?


    Yep, provided the mask is right. That's what the subnet mask is for- it
    defines what ranges of addresses are valid on that interface.

    > This
    > is what is really confusing to me... From looking at the manual it
    > seems to be that case that to enable routing you need to enable RIP,
    > or OSPF, BGP, or add static routing entries.

    It should just work, as it has interfaces in both subnets. It's only if
    you needed to route elsewhere as well that you need static routes (or a
    dynamic routing protocol like RIP).
    Chris Bartram, Sep 4, 2007
    #7
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