Canon S50 Dark Pictures

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jon, Oct 16, 2003.

  1. Jon

    Jon Guest

    Just purchased a Canon S50 camera. I took a picture of the room using
    Auto mode, it was during the day so wasn't dark. The flash went off,
    and the picture looked good on the LCD screen (lowest brightness).

    When I downloaded the pictures to the computer, they were must darker
    than on the camera, file format is JPG. Downloaded using the Zoom
    software, and then I viewed them in the default viewer for Windows XP,
    but they looked also the same in the ZoomBrowser software.

    Any ideas to what causes this?

    Jon
     
    Jon, Oct 16, 2003
    #1
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  2. Jon

    Bill Crocker Guest

    I have not experienced that myself, with my S50. What resolution are you
    shooting at? Not that it should make a difference in brightness...

    Bill Crocker


    "Jon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Just purchased a Canon S50 camera. I took a picture of the room using
    > Auto mode, it was during the day so wasn't dark. The flash went off,
    > and the picture looked good on the LCD screen (lowest brightness).
    >
    > When I downloaded the pictures to the computer, they were must darker
    > than on the camera, file format is JPG. Downloaded using the Zoom
    > software, and then I viewed them in the default viewer for Windows XP,
    > but they looked also the same in the ZoomBrowser software.
    >
    > Any ideas to what causes this?
    >
    > Jon
     
    Bill Crocker, Oct 16, 2003
    #2
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  3. Jon

    Todd Walker Guest

    In article <>, jon18
    says...
    > Just purchased a Canon S50 camera. I took a picture of the room using
    > Auto mode, it was during the day so wasn't dark. The flash went off,
    > and the picture looked good on the LCD screen (lowest brightness).
    >
    > When I downloaded the pictures to the computer, they were must darker
    > than on the camera, file format is JPG. Downloaded using the Zoom
    > software, and then I viewed them in the default viewer for Windows XP,
    > but they looked also the same in the ZoomBrowser software.
    >
    > Any ideas to what causes this?
    >
    > Jon


    Is your monitor set properly? Is it calibrated? Have you tried printing
    and seeing how they look on another output device? Scroll to the bottom
    of this page:

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canona70/

    (or any of DPR's reviews actually) and see if you can differentiate
    between the shades from white to black at the bottom (they are lettered
    A through Z.) If you can't see them all, you need to calibrate your
    monitor.

    --
    ________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://twalker.d2g.com
    Canon 10D:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/canon10d
    My Digital Photography Weblog:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    _________________________________
     
    Todd Walker, Oct 16, 2003
    #3
  4. Jon

    jeff liss Guest

    (Jon) wrote in message news:<>...
    > Just purchased a Canon S50 camera. I took a picture of the room using
    > Auto mode, it was during the day so wasn't dark. The flash went off,
    > and the picture looked good on the LCD screen (lowest brightness).
    >
    > When I downloaded the pictures to the computer, they were must darker
    > than on the camera, file format is JPG. Downloaded using the Zoom
    > software, and then I viewed them in the default viewer for Windows XP,
    > but they looked also the same in the ZoomBrowser software.
    >
    > Any ideas to what causes this?
    >
    > Jon


    ==========================================================================
    I'm not sure what caused the underexposure, but you could try a couple
    things. Set your exposure compensation to +1 (if this happens
    continuously) or just take the image into PhotoShop and lighten it up.
    Post production works wonders.I have an S50 and have had no problems
    with exposure. Good luck. BTW, I really like the camera, and learned a
    lot when I read the manual (many options at your fingertips).
    Jeff
     
    jeff liss, Oct 16, 2003
    #4
  5. Jon

    HavingFun Guest

    Hi Jon,

    Your camera's Histogram feature tells whether the photo is too dark or
    too bright. LCDs DON'T accurately measure this, as you found.

    http://www.quiknet.com/~frcn/Histograms.html

    Your camera's Exposure Compensation lets you make the actual
    adjustment. +2/3 is about right for an S50 indoor flash shot.

    Try Tungsten white balance if you see yellowing in your photo.

    Shots with good lighting and no flash look best, of course:

    http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/CS50/CS50PICS.HTM

    Post your photo next time. :)

    Cheers,
    HavingFun


    (Jon) wrote in message news:<>...
    > Just purchased a Canon S50 camera. I took a picture of the room using
    > Auto mode, it was during the day so wasn't dark. The flash went off,
    > and the picture looked good on the LCD screen (lowest brightness).
    >
    > When I downloaded the pictures to the computer, they were must darker
    > than on the camera, file format is JPG. Downloaded using the Zoom
    > software, and then I viewed them in the default viewer for Windows XP,
    > but they looked also the same in the ZoomBrowser software.
    >
    > Any ideas to what causes this?
    >
    > Jon
     
    HavingFun, Oct 16, 2003
    #5
  6. Jon

    HavingFun Guest

    Photoshop works miracles!

    It makes mediocre shots good, and good shots very good. :)

    -- HavingFun

    (jeff liss) wrote in message
    > I'm not sure what caused the underexposure, but you could try a couple
    > things. Set your exposure compensation to +1 (if this happens
    > continuously) or just take the image into PhotoShop and lighten it up.
    > Post production works wonders.I have an S50 and have had no problems
    > with exposure. Good luck. BTW, I really like the camera, and learned a
    > lot when I read the manual (many options at your fingertips).
    > Jeff
     
    HavingFun, Oct 16, 2003
    #6
  7. Jon

    Todd Walker Guest

    Todd Walker, Oct 16, 2003
    #7
  8. Jon

    HavingFun Guest

    You snipped half my 2-line reply:

    ::: Photoshop works miracles!
    ::: It makes mediocre shots good, and good shots very good. :)

    What EXACTLY do you disagree with?? I never claimed Photoshop turns
    crappy photos into good ones! Still, what Photoshop does is amazing.

    Todd Walker <> wrote in message

    > No it doesn't. If you have a crappy shot to begin with, Photoshop isn't

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    > going to help you.
     
    HavingFun, Oct 17, 2003
    #8
  9. Jon

    Todd Walker Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > You snipped half my 2-line reply:
    >
    > ::: Photoshop works miracles!
    > ::: It makes mediocre shots good, and good shots very good. :)
    >
    > What EXACTLY do you disagree with?? I never claimed Photoshop turns
    > crappy photos into good ones! Still, what Photoshop does is amazing.
    >


    Sorry I wasn't clear. This statement:

    "Photoshop works miracles!"

    is what I disagree with. It is a very powerful software tool to be sure,
    but it can't work miracles. The reason I replied as I did is that many
    people think that they don't have to pay particular attention to doing
    everything right when they take the shot because they can fix their
    mistakes in Photoshop later. This isn't the case. Yes, it can fix some
    problems but if you start with crap, you'll finish with different
    looking crap.

    --
    ________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://twalker.d2g.com
    Canon 10D:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/canon10d
    My Digital Photography Weblog:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    _________________________________
     
    Todd Walker, Oct 17, 2003
    #9
  10. Jon

    HavingFun Guest

    Thanks for the clarification. I totally agree with you. :)

    -- HavingFun

    > Sorry I wasn't clear. This statement:
    >
    > "Photoshop works miracles!"
    >
    > is what I disagree with. It is a very powerful software tool to be sure,
    > but it can't work miracles. The reason I replied as I did is that many
    > people think that they don't have to pay particular attention to doing
    > everything right when they take the shot because they can fix their
    > mistakes in Photoshop later. This isn't the case. Yes, it can fix some
    > problems but if you start with crap, you'll finish with different
    > looking crap.
     
    HavingFun, Oct 20, 2003
    #10
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