Canon new Rebel XTi

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Tass, Oct 30, 2006.

  1. Tass

    Tass Guest

    I am close to buying the newest Canon XTi. Does this mean flash or focusing
    and can this not be done manually with the camera? Anything negative or
    positive about this camera would be a great help. Thanks Kathy
     
    Tass, Oct 30, 2006
    #1
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  2. Tass

    Pete D Guest

    "Tass" <> wrote in message
    news:Ygi1h.218464$5R2.193869@pd7urf3no...
    >I am close to buying the newest Canon XTi. Does this mean flash or
    >focusing and can this not be done manually with the camera? Anything
    >negative or positive about this camera would be a great help. Thanks
    >Kathy
    >
    >
    >


    It's a D-SLR mate, perhaps you had better look at www.dpreview.com and in
    your local camera shop before you get one. Have a play in the shop and see
    if you like the handling, some do, some don't, they will take a good photo
    if you are up to it.
     
    Pete D, Oct 30, 2006
    #2
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  3. Tass

    Tass Guest

    I left out the most important part. I meant I know it lacks spot
    metering...Does this mean flash or
    focusing and can this not be done manually with the camera? I have been to
    www.dpreview.com and also Steve's digicam. I have held it and the Nikon D50
    or D80 and find it really like the weight as I have small hands. What do
    you mean by...they will take a good photo if you are up to it? Thanks for
    the reply. Kathy

    "Pete D" <> wrote in message
    news:4545b3c6$0$7995$...
    >
    > "Tass" <> wrote in message
    > news:Ygi1h.218464$5R2.193869@pd7urf3no...
    >>I am close to buying the newest Canon XTi. Does this mean flash or
    >>focusing and can this not be done manually with the camera? Anything
    >>negative or positive about this camera would be a great help. Thanks
    >>Kathy
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > It's a D-SLR mate, perhaps you had better look at www.dpreview.com and in
    > your local camera shop before you get one. Have a play in the shop and see
    > if you like the handling, some do, some don't, they will take a good photo
    > if you are up to it.
    >
     
    Tass, Oct 30, 2006
    #3
  4. "Tass" <> wrote:
    >I left out the most important part. I meant I know it lacks spot
    >metering...Does this mean flash or
    > focusing and can this not be done manually with the camera?


    No. Spot metering is an advanced technique that's worth learning, useful,
    interesting, neat, and all that, but doesn't have anything to do with flash
    or focusing or doing those manually or not.

    The partial metering it does have can be used like a spot meter, except
    being larger than a spot, it's a tad irritating.

    The low-end dSLRs do have some limitations compared to the high-end models
    (e.g. Nikon D200, Canon 5D), but there's nothing major missing.

    Also, spot metering isn't all that desperately important for a dSLR. I
    prefer using a separate spot meter for shooting slide film in my film
    cameras, but just use matrix metering and then check the historgram with my
    dSLRs. Snotty Zone System afficionados, such as myself, let themselves get
    bent out of shape that Canon low end cameras (and until recently, mid-range
    cameras as well) don't have a spot meter, but in real life, it's not a big
    deal.

    > I have been to www.dpreview.com and also Steve's digicam. I have held it
    > and the Nikon D50 or D80 and find it really like the weight as I have
    > small hands.


    Yep. It's designed to be a compact camera for small hands.

    > What do you mean by...they will take a good photo if you are up to it?
    > Thanks for the reply. Kathy


    That was either a kind warning that dSLRs provide a lot of flexibility and
    take some learning, or else a snotty comment from someone who thinks they're
    smarter than you. You can take it either way depending on how grumpy/snappy
    you're feeling<g>.

    I'd recommend taking it as a kind warning, and plan on learning about
    photography; the neat thing about digital cameras is that they let you
    experiment at no cost and see the results quickly.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Oct 30, 2006
    #4
  5. Tass

    Bill Guest

    "Tass" <> wrote in message
    news:Ygi1h.218464$5R2.193869@pd7urf3no...
    >I am close to buying the newest Canon XTi. Does this mean flash or
    >focusing and can this not be done manually with the camera?


    Yes, you can have full control over the flash and manual focusing if
    you with. It's the same as any other digital or film SLR camera.

    > Anything negative or positive about this camera would be a great
    > help. Thanks Kathy


    The only negative thing is the size, I find the body is too small for
    my hands. The ergonomics are not very good as I find myself twisting
    my fingers to use the controls, and my little finger hangs off the
    bottom of the camera.

    I recently bought a new DSLR and I looked at every model over the last
    couple of months, including the Rebel XTi, Canon 20D, 30D, Nikon D80,
    Sony Alpha, etc. I bought the Nikon D80 because it was the most
    comfortable to use. The ergonomics and control layout are clearly the
    best for my hands. Some people may prefer one of the others, so it's
    always a good idea to handle the cameras before making a decision.

    Personally, I think the Nikon D80 is the best 10 megapixel camera
    available right now with the best price/performance ratio. The Canon
    and Sony have gimmick features like a vibrating unit to "clean" the
    sensor, but they don't really do anything so it's not a benefit. I
    found the Nikon to be faster and more responsive than the other 10mp
    units, with lots of direct controls and features. The Nikon costs a
    bit more than the others, but the difference is well worth the money.

    The only other camera that could match or best the Nikon in
    performance was the Canon 30D. It performs on par with the Nikon D80,
    but it costs over $350 CDN more, only has an 8 megapixel sensor, the
    viewfinder isn't quite as good, and it doesn't feel as good in my
    hands.

    In the end, the Nikon handled better and performed as good or better,
    so I couldn't justify the price difference. The Nikon won and now it
    sits happily in my camera bag.

    :)
     
    Bill, Oct 30, 2006
    #5
  6. Tass

    Pete D Guest

    "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote in message
    news:ei4gb2$1fr$...
    >
    > "Tass" <> wrote:
    >>I left out the most important part. I meant I know it lacks spot
    >>metering...Does this mean flash or
    >> focusing and can this not be done manually with the camera?

    >
    > No. Spot metering is an advanced technique that's worth learning, useful,
    > interesting, neat, and all that, but doesn't have anything to do with
    > flash or focusing or doing those manually or not.
    >
    > The partial metering it does have can be used like a spot meter, except
    > being larger than a spot, it's a tad irritating.
    >
    > The low-end dSLRs do have some limitations compared to the high-end models
    > (e.g. Nikon D200, Canon 5D), but there's nothing major missing.
    >
    > Also, spot metering isn't all that desperately important for a dSLR. I
    > prefer using a separate spot meter for shooting slide film in my film
    > cameras, but just use matrix metering and then check the historgram with
    > my dSLRs. Snotty Zone System afficionados, such as myself, let themselves
    > get bent out of shape that Canon low end cameras (and until recently,
    > mid-range cameras as well) don't have a spot meter, but in real life, it's
    > not a big deal.
    >
    >> I have been to www.dpreview.com and also Steve's digicam. I have held
    >> it and the Nikon D50 or D80 and find it really like the weight as I have
    >> small hands.

    >
    > Yep. It's designed to be a compact camera for small hands.
    >
    >> What do you mean by...they will take a good photo if you are up to it?
    >> Thanks for the reply. Kathy

    >
    > That was either a kind warning that dSLRs provide a lot of flexibility and
    > take some learning, or else a snotty comment from someone who thinks
    > they're smarter than you. You can take it either way depending on how
    > grumpy/snappy you're feeling<g>.
    >
    > I'd recommend taking it as a kind warning, and plan on learning about
    > photography; the neat thing about digital cameras is that they let you
    > experiment at no cost and see the results quickly.
    >
    > David J. Littleboy
    > Tokyo, Japan


    David,

    You know very well that I only make snotty comments to RichA because he
    thinks I am a Canon lover.

    It certainly was a warning that D-SLR's in general can be a handfull to get
    the best from.

    Seriously though I don't believe this small hands theory, a mate at work is
    a really big guy and has a D50 and loves the handling, a friend in another
    group has both a 10D and a 20D and she is not large but loves the handling
    of both cameras, I personally like most of the D-SLR's except for the
    cheaper Canons, I have used some only lightly but have used S2Pro's
    extensively for some work among others and it is a decision you must make
    for yourself as to what is important in the handling. I have watched small
    women doing shoots with D2X/H's and they would not trade for a smaller
    camera. I like compact but have a K10D on order.
     
    Pete D, Oct 30, 2006
    #6
  7. Tass

    Tony Rice Guest

    "Bill" <> wrote in
    news::

    >> Anything negative or positive about this camera would be a great
    >> help. Thanks Kathy

    >
    > The only negative thing is the size, I find the body is too small for
    > my hands. The ergonomics are not very good as I find myself twisting
    > my fingers to use the controls, and my little finger hangs off the
    > bottom of the camera.


    I've got the Rebel XT and find it's size to be a positive. The camera
    becomes an extension of my hand instead of hanging awkwardly off it.
     
    Tony Rice, Oct 30, 2006
    #7

  8. >
    > Seriously though I don't believe this small hands theory,


    I agree. The only way to tell if you are going to feel comfortable with
    a camera is to pick up and play with it. My opinion of what a camera feels
    like is worthless to anyone else even someone my same size.

    The only general thing that I can suggest is that the very old and the
    very young usually do best with larger controls than smaller.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan
     
    Joseph Meehan, Oct 30, 2006
    #8
  9. "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> Seriously though I don't believe this small hands theory,

    >
    > I agree. The only way to tell if you are going to feel comfortable
    > with a camera is to pick up and play with it. My opinion of what a camera
    > feels like is worthless to anyone else even someone my same size.


    Good thing the OP in this thread has already handled the beast and finds it
    comfortable to use<g>.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Oct 30, 2006
    #9
  10. Tass

    Bill Guest

    "Tony Rice" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns986C466E8655Cjkl123iop@216.196.97.131...
    > "Bill" <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >>> Anything negative or positive about this camera would be a great

    >>
    >> The only negative thing is the size, I find the body is too small
    >> for
    >> my hands. The ergonomics are not very good as I find myself
    >> twisting
    >> my fingers to use the controls, and my little finger hangs off the
    >> bottom of the camera.

    >
    > I've got the Rebel XT and find it's size to be a positive. The
    > camera
    > becomes an extension of my hand instead of hanging awkwardly off it.



    If that works for you, fine.

    But I had the Rebel XT until last week. I originally bought it 1.5
    years ago for price and performance over the 20D, and hoped the small
    size and weight would be an advantage when traveling. At first it was
    nice to have a compact camera, even if it was a little awkward to hold
    (little finger dangled off the bottom and a battery grip got in the
    way twisting my little finger even worse). But now I'd rather have a
    camera that is comfortable to use all day without making my fingers
    ache from poor ergonomic layout, and tolerate the slight increase in
    size and weight. This all started when I borrowed a friends Nikon D70s
    with a couple of nice lenses and realized the difference a good
    handling camera makes.

    I slowly grew to dislike the small size of the XT and when the
    opportunity arose, I sold the XT and lenses, and switched to a Nikon
    D80 just this past week. Handling wasn't the only reason of course,
    but my little finger is very grateful.

    :)
     
    Bill, Oct 30, 2006
    #10
  11. Tass

    Bill Hilton Guest

    >Tass wrote:
    >
    > I am close to buying the newest Canon XTi. ... Anything negative
    > or positive about this camera would be a great help. Thanks


    My wife got one as a backup, replacing a 10D (her main camera is the 1D
    Mark II, a much heavier pro model) ... just comparing it to the 10D
    (the only non-1D series model we've used), it seems to autofocus much
    faster and clears the buffer faster, so it's more responsive (and of
    course 10 Mpix vs 6 Mpix). Has 9 AF points, more than the 10D, and
    this also helps since we're both used to the 45 point AF models.

    One thing that didn't seem to work very well was the vibrating sensor
    dust removal, but the dust mapping/software delete worked OK.

    As for the big hands/small hands arguments, I have big hands and the
    buttons were a bit close together for me but otherwise I got used to it
    pretty fast ... my wife has small hands but seems equally adept with
    either this smaller 18 oz Rebel or her much larger 44 oz 1D M II.

    For sure if you want a light camera to carry around more places this is
    a good choice for Canon users.

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Oct 30, 2006
    #11
  12. Tass

    Pete D Guest

    "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote in message
    news:ei4uhb$572$...
    > "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Seriously though I don't believe this small hands theory,

    >>
    >> I agree. The only way to tell if you are going to feel comfortable
    >> with a camera is to pick up and play with it. My opinion of what a
    >> camera feels like is worthless to anyone else even someone my same size.

    >
    > Good thing the OP in this thread has already handled the beast and finds
    > it comfortable to use<g>.
    >
    > David J. Littleboy
    > Tokyo, Japan
    >



    The OP did confuse me a bit when she said,

    "Does this mean flash or focusing
    and can this not be done manually with the camera?"

    I really thought that she did not have much of an idea about SLR cameras in
    general!
     
    Pete D, Oct 31, 2006
    #12
  13. >I am close to buying the newest Canon XTi. Does this mean flash or focusing
    >and can this not be done manually with the camera? Anything negative or
    >positive about this camera would be a great help. Thanks Kathy


    I just looked at the XTI and the 30D.

    The XTi does have a full manual mode, but it doesn't have a second
    dial, so in manual mode you have to press a button while turning a
    knob to change the F-stop. That's one big drawback.

    The second drawback is that the camera itself is a little too small
    for my hands. You may or may not agree. But it's also a light
    camera, which makes it harder to hold still. That's a second
    drawback.

    The advantages to the XTi over the 30D are it's price (about 2/3
    cheaper) and the slightly higher resolution.

    Both cameras have good full-auto modes.

    -Joel

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Free Bible and Mishna printouts in Hebrew: http://liturgy.exc.com/
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
    Dr. Joel M. Hoffman, Nov 8, 2006
    #13
  14. >I left out the most important part. I meant I know it lacks spot
    >metering...Does this mean flash or


    Do you really need spot metering? Don't forget, if you shoot raw you
    have about 2 f-stops of latitude, and you do get a histrogram after
    each shot, so you can check the metering.

    -Joel

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Free Bible and Mishna printouts in Hebrew: http://liturgy.exc.com/
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
    Dr. Joel M. Hoffman, Nov 8, 2006
    #14
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