Canon High Power Flash for Powershot cameras

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mark Cutler, Jul 22, 2005.

  1. Mark Cutler

    Mark Cutler Guest

    I just received the CANON High Power Flash HF-DC1 and have tested it with my
    S1-IS camera. As advertised, it does double the range of the flash. However, at
    it's maximum setting, with my telephoto lens at its maximum setting, I seem to
    lose all benefit of the camera's Image Stabilization. At the medium setting on
    the flash, the Image Stabilization still works, but the power of the flash is
    only slightly better than the normal flash alone. Has anyone else had experience
    with this flash unit?

    Mark Cutler
    Mark Cutler, Jul 22, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Mark Cutler

    ASAAR Guest

    On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 16:13:51 GMT, Mark Cutler wrote:

    > I just received the CANON High Power Flash HF-DC1 and have tested it
    > with my S1-IS camera. As advertised, it does double the range of the flash.
    > However, at it's maximum setting, with my telephoto lens at its maximum
    > setting, I seem to lose all benefit of the camera's Image Stabilization.


    It seems unlikely that the flash could prevent the camera's IS
    from working. It's wireless, triggers by sensing the camera's
    flash, and doesn't communicate with the camera. If it's turned off
    does the camera's IS still work properly taking the same type of
    flash shots that you found problematical with the HF-DC1 powered on?
    Maybe at the maximum zoom setting you're near the borderline of
    being able to hold the camera steady enough for the IS to work, and
    the additional weight of the flash is what' causing the problem at
    maximum zoom.


    > At the medium setting on the flash, the Image Stabilization still works, but
    > the power of the flash is only slightly better than the normal flash alone.


    Despite its name, the HF-DC1 is a fairly low powered flash. It's
    only 'high power' when compared with the underpowered flashes built
    into most cameras. When used at the medium setting you shouldn't
    expect to see more than a modest boost over the camera's built-in
    flash. You can use multiple HF-DC1 flashes, and the use of the
    medium and low power settings are probably most useful when the
    flash isn't attached with the bracket to the camera, but is used to
    provide supplemental light to different (usually more distant)
    objects in the scene.
    ASAAR, Jul 22, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Mark Cutler

    Mark Cutler Guest

    In article <>, ASAAR <>
    wrote:

    > On Fri, 22 Jul 2005 16:13:51 GMT, Mark Cutler wrote:
    >
    > > I just received the CANON High Power Flash HF-DC1 and have tested it
    > > with my S1-IS camera. As advertised, it does double the range of the flash.
    > > However, at it's maximum setting, with my telephoto lens at its maximum
    > > setting, I seem to lose all benefit of the camera's Image Stabilization.

    >
    > It seems unlikely that the flash could prevent the camera's IS
    > from working. It's wireless, triggers by sensing the camera's
    > flash, and doesn't communicate with the camera. If it's turned off
    > does the camera's IS still work properly taking the same type of
    > flash shots that you found problematical with the HF-DC1 powered on?
    > Maybe at the maximum zoom setting you're near the borderline of
    > being able to hold the camera steady enough for the IS to work, and
    > the additional weight of the flash is what' causing the problem at
    > maximum zoom.



    I tried several tests of exactly the same picture with the flash attached, but
    turned on or turned off. The telephoto was always at its maximum setting. Every
    shot with the flash off is crisp, but underexposed. Every shot with the flash on
    is nicely exposed, but blurry. I agree with your logic - this makes no sense.
    But it definitely happens and very consistently.

    Since my first post I made some more tests and discovered that the image
    stabilization works nicely with the flash on when the camera is set to "P" mode.
    My earlier tests were all with the camera in "AUTO" mode.
    Mark Cutler, Jul 23, 2005
    #3
  4. Mark Cutler

    ASAAR Guest

    On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 14:38:17 GMT, Mark Cutler wrote:

    > I tried several tests of exactly the same picture with the flash attached, but
    > turned on or turned off. The telephoto was always at its maximum setting.
    > Every shot with the flash off is crisp, but underexposed. Every shot with the
    > flash on is nicely exposed, but blurry. I agree with your logic - this makes no
    > sense. But it definitely happens and very consistently.
    >
    > Since my first post I made some more tests and discovered that the image
    > stabilization works nicely with the flash on when the camera is set to "P"
    > mode. My earlier tests were all with the camera in "AUTO" mode.


    Were the re-tests that you mention in the first paragraph above
    done using "P" mode or "Auto" mode? Assuming that it was in "Auto"
    mode then it might be that an excessively long shutter speed was
    used, and you can check this in the EXIF data. And then it might be
    that it wasn't the IS that helped to make the shot crisp, but the
    very short duration of the combined flashes. At reduced power the
    output of the HF-DC1 is probably about the same as the camera's
    flash, and probably of about the same duration, but it may not
    precisely coincide with the camera's flash. It's probably close
    enough so that even if there is some overlap, the combined flash
    duration is not much longer than that of just the camera's flash,
    and pictures seem about as sharp as when the HF-DC1 isn't used.

    But when the flash's output is set to "High", it's duration is
    longer, allowing more of the camera's movement to be caught. This
    movement is always going to be there to some degree if you don't use
    a tripod. The IS system reduces, but doesn't eliminate it. If the
    above is what's happening with your camera, then it may be that when
    switching from "Auto" to "P" mode your camera used a higher shutter
    speed, which was long enough to catch all or most of the light
    emitted by the camera's flash (not surprising that no light would be
    wasted since the camera and flash were designed as a single system).
    But this faster shutter speed might have truncated some of the
    HF-DC1's output, making for the crisper pictures you've taken in "P"
    mode. Again, I don't know if this is what's happening, but it might
    be confirmed by a quicker shutter speed in the EXIF data, especially
    if the power provided by the HF-DC1 seems not quite as high as when
    it was used at maximum power with the camera in "Auto" mode.
    ASAAR, Jul 23, 2005
    #4
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Sexy Susan

    Re: Canon Powershot A60 vs. Canon Powershot A70

    Sexy Susan, Sep 18, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    439
    Browntimdc
    Sep 22, 2003
  2. KOS
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    557
    Darius Alexander
    Sep 25, 2003
  3. Andrys Basten

    Re: Canon Powershot A60 vs. Canon Powershot A70

    Andrys Basten, Oct 15, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    486
    Timothy Lange
    Oct 15, 2003
  4. Replies:
    5
    Views:
    549
    ASAAR
    Nov 6, 2006
  5. Giuen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    865
    Giuen
    Sep 12, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page