Canon G5 camera and Canon i860 printer?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by John C. McKissick, Jan 6, 2004.

  1. I have seen some good reviews on the printer and I own the G5 now and
    love it so far.

    My question is how well does the combo work in the direct print mode. Is
    it worth doing under any circumstances or will I be disappointed not
    getting the image on a computer to edit or tweak.

    Thanks
    John
     
    John C. McKissick, Jan 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. Anybody!!!
     
    John C. McKissick, Jan 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. John,

    you seem to have found an answer to your initial posting already.

    However, I still feel motivated to put in an experience with prints,
    based on my Canon G2.
    I was surprised by the out of the box excellent quality of the pictures.
    Generally, no post processing was neccessary except for cropping some
    pictures. Now to the printing business.

    My previous experiences with inkjet printers were not favourable. Though
    these are laying back some years and a lot of progress seems to have
    been achieved with printer technology and inks I went straight away to
    get prints done by a professional print service (8x10") and have been
    totally satisfied with the results.
    Well, actually I was niot really truthful about the 'straight away'
    because I was hanging around the printer department before deciding
    against this option.

    Try out a professional printer service before meddling around with some
    inkjet-printer if you don't have compelling reasons for using one.

    Well, just a thought.
    Guenter

    "John C. McKissick" wrote:

    > Anybody!!!
     
    Guenter Fieblinger, Jan 7, 2004
    #3
  4. John C. McKissick

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Guenter Fieblinger wrote:

    > John,
    >
    > you seem to have found an answer to your initial posting already.
    >
    > However, I still feel motivated to put in an experience with prints,
    > based on my Canon G2.
    > I was surprised by the out of the box excellent quality of the pictures.
    > Generally, no post processing was neccessary except for cropping some
    > pictures. Now to the printing business.
    >
    > My previous experiences with inkjet printers were not favourable. Though
    > these are laying back some years and a lot of progress seems to have
    > been achieved with printer technology and inks I went straight away to
    > get prints done by a professional print service (8x10") and have been
    > totally satisfied with the results.
    > Well, actually I was niot really truthful about the 'straight away'
    > because I was hanging around the printer department before deciding
    > against this option.
    >
    > Try out a professional printer service before meddling around with some
    > inkjet-printer if you don't have compelling reasons for using one.
    >
    > Well, just a thought.
    > Guenter
    >
    > "John C. McKissick" wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Anybody!!!

    >
    >

    Since you admit your knowledge is dated, perhaps a few minutes spent
    browsing the inkjet aisle at a good computer store is in order. At the
    least, you would be able to make a current assesment. I also expect you
    will be quite surprised at the quality of the latest inkjet printers.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 7, 2004
    #4
  5. Ron Hunter wrote:

    > Guenter Fieblinger wrote:
    >
    > > John,
    > >
    > > you seem to have found an answer to your initial posting already.
    > >
    > > However, I still feel motivated to put in an experience with prints,
    > > based on my Canon G2.
    > > I was surprised by the out of the box excellent quality of the pictures.
    > > Generally, no post processing was neccessary except for cropping some
    > > pictures. Now to the printing business.
    > >
    > > My previous experiences with inkjet printers were not favourable. Though
    > > these are laying back some years and a lot of progress seems to have
    > > been achieved with printer technology and inks I went straight away to
    > > get prints done by a professional print service (8x10") and have been
    > > totally satisfied with the results.
    > > Well, actually I was niot really truthful about the 'straight away'
    > > because I was hanging around the printer department before deciding
    > > against this option.
    > >
    > > Try out a professional printer service before meddling around with some
    > > inkjet-printer if you don't have compelling reasons for using one.
    > >
    > > Well, just a thought.
    > > Guenter
    > >
    > > "John C. McKissick" wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Anybody!!!

    > >
    > >

    > Since you admit your knowledge is dated, perhaps a few minutes spent
    > browsing the inkjet aisle at a good computer store is in order. At the
    > least, you would be able to make a current assesment. I also expect you
    > will be quite surprised at the quality of the latest inkjet printers.


    Ron,

    what you say is true.
    And I should have been a bit more specific to disclose the deeper rooted
    layers of my prejudice against inkjet printing that is only partly based on
    output quality. As you expected I was quite surprised by what I saw when
    polling the market of '6 colour photo printers'. Therfore I didn't even
    mention quality in my message but gave just the advice to test a professional
    printing service before going for inkjet printing.
    Well, now to my prejudice that has not been overcome by what I gathered about
    inkjet technology in recent times. Actually, I can not even claim first hand
    experiences because I just gave up on inkjet printing years ago when I got
    used to color laser printing in my work environment. But I maintained a
    passing interest in inkjets all the time.

    Now let me spell out my prejudice in more detail:

    - inkjet print quality can be quite good but it is not uniformly so. And
    sometimes it needs tedious work by postprocessing the data file to avoid
    unfortunate hues produced by mixing the inks.
    - when viewing inkjet prints I sometimes get the impression that people have
    adjusted their perception to the colour spectrum of the inks. Like people
    where appraising a 'real time' sunset by its similarity to what they were
    expecting from their education by Kodak prints in the old times. Well all this
    is a bit exaggerated of course, but prejudices are that way.
    - I have jet to see an inkjet printer that is in good working order when I
    return from my more extended holidays. The printer head has some stuck jets,
    red or green is finished, the paper is not up to the task......
    - the overall cost of an inkjet print is quite pricey. Much money has to be
    invested in high grade paper, in replacement cartridges, and into trial runs
    when experimenting with manipulations of the colour spectrum of the image.
    - It takes time to get the prints done, especially when not doing it
    routinely.

    With this prejudices in mind consider my elation when I sent my unprocessed
    data files to a printing service (6 pm) and had a bulging envelope of prints
    next morning (11 am). Prints in a quality better than anything I had hoped
    for. After this shock therapy I have not spent another minute on considering
    DIY inkjet printing. Using a professional service was coinciding with using my
    new Canon G2 for the first time after years of not doing much digital
    photography at all.

    After all this musing on the progress of digital photography and your rightly
    ventured criticism I should probably be more cautious because they (Canon) may
    have got it right not only with their camera but with the their dedicated
    printers, too. I will try to get some first hand experience and will try even
    harder to keep an open mind on this matter.

    Guenter
     
    Guenter Fieblinger, Jan 8, 2004
    #5
  6. John C. McKissick

    Dr. Bob Guest

    "
    Guenter: Obviously, your mail service (Germany?) is far superior to ours
    here in the US! The idea that we could get materials moved two ways in just
    over 18 hours is unthinkable.
    I also get the impression that you are not really into "playing" with
    your images in Photoshop (or other). For me, that is at least half the fun.
    As for your comment about people "adapting" to the colors from inkjets, this
    is hardly restricted to digital. Kodachrome was notorious for oversaturated
    colors, and Velvia is even worse.
     
    Dr. Bob, Jan 8, 2004
    #6
  7. Hi Dr. Bob,

    as to mail services one has to bear in mind that Germany is a lot smaller than
    the US. And I may have to clarify 'material' has been moved only one way as the
    files were uploaded by internet to the service provider. So by now one may
    wonder why they took so long to deliver :)

    Your assumption about my abstaining from post processing photos is correct.
    I realize that it may be a lot of fun to edit images with modern software. But I
    had an overdose of this when I had to colour correct every single image taken
    with the early crop of digital cameras that I started with many years ago.
    Therefore I am very pleased with the quality of images that I get from my Canon
    G2. With a little care when taking the photos no post processing is neccessary
    at all (except for some cropping or downsizing files, of course).
    As for aiming at special effects by editing pictures I lack the time and skill
    to get any noteworthy results. But if I were in that business I sure would like
    to get a rapid feed back from instant prints. That would be a real advantage of
    inkjet printers even when professional overnight services were available.

    Guenter




    "Dr. Bob" wrote:

    > "
    > Guenter: Obviously, your mail service (Germany?) is far superior to ours
    > here in the US! The idea that we could get materials moved two ways in just
    > over 18 hours is unthinkable.
    > I also get the impression that you are not really into "playing" with
    > your images in Photoshop (or other). For me, that is at least half the fun.
    > As for your comment about people "adapting" to the colors from inkjets, this
    > is hardly restricted to digital. Kodachrome was notorious for oversaturated
    > colors, and Velvia is even worse.
     
    Guenter Fieblinger, Jan 10, 2004
    #7
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