Canon A60 repair info?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by bugbear, Oct 19, 2004.

  1. bugbear

    bugbear Guest

    My Canon A60 has taken 660 photos (they're numbered
    so I know!).

    It is 14 months old, and out of inital warrenty period.

    It's bust...

    I've been quoted 80 GBP for a full disassembly/review
    with no guarantee of a successful repair after that cost.

    Since this is close to the equivalent replacement cost,
    my best option (it's a no-loss move) is to try to repair
    it myself. If I can't I'll buy the replacement.

    It seems to be a loose connection, since the fault
    is intermittent.

    So - anyone got any information on basic disassembly
    of digital cameras in general, more particularly
    Canon 'A' series, and Canon A60 in particular?

    It's a real shame, because I like the camera.
    When it's working :-(

    BugBear
    bugbear, Oct 19, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. bugbear

    G-Man Guest

    I found a PARTS manual in PDF for your camera. This will help you
    dissasemble the camera I'm sure. Good luck!

    http://home19.inet.tele.dk/ne/manualer.htm



    "bugbear" <bugbear@trim_papermule_trim.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:4174ece1$0$44836$...
    > My Canon A60 has taken 660 photos (they're numbered
    > so I know!).
    >
    > It is 14 months old, and out of inital warrenty period.
    >
    > It's bust...
    >
    > I've been quoted 80 GBP for a full disassembly/review
    > with no guarantee of a successful repair after that cost.
    >
    > Since this is close to the equivalent replacement cost,
    > my best option (it's a no-loss move) is to try to repair
    > it myself. If I can't I'll buy the replacement.
    >
    > It seems to be a loose connection, since the fault
    > is intermittent.
    >
    > So - anyone got any information on basic disassembly
    > of digital cameras in general, more particularly
    > Canon 'A' series, and Canon A60 in particular?
    >
    > It's a real shame, because I like the camera.
    > When it's working :-(
    >
    > BugBear
    G-Man, Oct 19, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. bugbear

    tomcas Guest

    bugbear wrote:
    > My Canon A60 has taken 660 photos (they're numbered
    > so I know!).
    >
    > It is 14 months old, and out of inital warrenty period.
    >
    > It's bust...
    >
    > I've been quoted 80 GBP for a full disassembly/review
    > with no guarantee of a successful repair after that cost.
    >
    > Since this is close to the equivalent replacement cost,
    > my best option (it's a no-loss move) is to try to repair
    > it myself. If I can't I'll buy the replacement.
    >
    > It seems to be a loose connection, since the fault
    > is intermittent.
    >
    > So - anyone got any information on basic disassembly
    > of digital cameras in general, more particularly
    > Canon 'A' series, and Canon A60 in particular?
    >
    > It's a real shame, because I like the camera.
    > When it's working :-(
    >
    > BugBear


    I've taken apart my A70 and fixed a jammed lens after the camera was
    dropped. With the exception of the two halves having a snap fit at the
    top it is held together with just small phillips screws. You will not
    need to peel anything off to access the screws, but they can be hard to
    see. Besides the screws that are visible on the outside there are also
    some in the battery cavity, near the battery hinge, and under the rubber
    plug on the side. I can't remember if there was one under the lens ring
    that needed to be removed, but some that are visible under the ring
    don't have to be removed to open the halves. It will be worthwhile to
    get a high quality 000 phillips screwdriver. It seems all the screws are
    different so it can't hurt to keep track of where they go. When you get
    all the screws out, remove the back by prying it apart slightly at the
    bottom and letting it hinge at the top. Stop at about 5 or 10 degrees.
    Now you will have to release the snaps at the top. There is no easy way
    to do it. Just go slow. I can't remember any other specifics other than
    one screw, which is very hard to see deep inside the camera on the left
    of the viewfinder, which has to be removed if you want to remove the
    front cover. Also, I recall the multifunction knob having to be removed,
    and the strap attachment bracket screw needs to be removed. I wish I had
    taken pictures but it was the only camera I had. It's a good idea to put
    a piece of tape over the flash capacitor so you don't get shocked. It is
    300 volts and can easily cause you to toss the camera when you get
    shocked. Better still, you can discharge it by shorting the cap with a
    couple of meg resistor. Don't use a screwdriver or pliers. There are at
    least a dozen different subassemblies all connected with the kapton flex
    connectors. I can't imagine any coming loose, but you are taking the
    same approach that I did, you have nothing too loose. Half way through
    the disassembly I was thinking there is no way I'm ever going to get
    this back together. Three quarters of the way I am thinking I might as
    well take it apart further just for the hell of it. After I fixed the
    lens I started thinking I might actually get this back together but I
    wished I had taken better notes when I took it apart. Well I got it back
    together and even though I had four extras screw left over it has been
    working fine for a few months now.
    tomcas, Oct 19, 2004
    #3
  4. bugbear

    bugbear Guest

    tomcas wrote:
    > Half way through
    > the disassembly I was thinking there is no way I'm ever going to get
    > this back together. Three quarters of the way I am thinking I might as
    > well take it apart further just for the hell of it. After I fixed the
    > lens I started thinking I might actually get this back together but I
    > wished I had taken better notes when I took it apart. Well I got it back
    > together and even though I had four extras screw left over it has been
    > working fine for a few months now.


    In other craft forums, I've recommended the use of a Digital
    camera (such as my A60) to record disassembly stages.

    I believe this would present a "boostrap" problem
    in this instance :)

    BugBear
    bugbear, Oct 19, 2004
    #4
  5. bugbear

    PhotoMan Guest

    tomcas wrote:

    > I've taken apart my A70 and fixed a jammed lens after the camera was
    > dropped. With the exception of the two halves having a snap fit at the
    > top it is held together with just small phillips screws. You will not
    > need to peel anything off to access the screws, but they can be hard
    > to see. Besides the screws that are visible on the outside there are
    > also some in the battery cavity, near the battery hinge, and under
    > the rubber plug on the side. I can't remember if there was one under
    > the lens ring that needed to be removed, but some that are visible
    > under the ring don't have to be removed to open the halves. It will
    > be worthwhile to get a high quality 000 phillips screwdriver. It
    > seems all the screws are different so it can't hurt to keep track of
    > where they go. When you get all the screws out, remove the back by
    > prying it apart slightly at the bottom and letting it hinge at the
    > top. Stop at about 5 or 10 degrees. Now you will have to release the
    > snaps at the top. There is no easy way to do it. Just go slow. I
    > can't remember any other specifics other than one screw, which is
    > very hard to see deep inside the camera on the left of the
    > viewfinder, which has to be removed if you want to remove the front
    > cover. Also, I recall the multifunction knob having to be removed,
    > and the strap attachment bracket screw needs to be removed. I wish I
    > had taken pictures but it was the only camera I had. It's a good idea
    > to put a piece of tape over the flash capacitor so you don't get
    > shocked. It is 300 volts and can easily cause you to toss the camera
    > when you get shocked. Better still, you can discharge it by shorting
    > the cap with a couple of meg resistor. Don't use a screwdriver or
    > pliers. There are at least a dozen different subassemblies all
    > connected with the kapton flex connectors. I can't imagine any coming
    > loose, but you are taking the same approach that I did, you have
    > nothing too loose. Half way through the disassembly I was thinking
    > there is no way I'm ever going to get this back together. Three
    > quarters of the way I am thinking I might as well take it apart
    > further just for the hell of it. After I fixed the lens I started
    > thinking I might actually get this back together but I wished I had
    > taken better notes when I took it apart. Well I got it back together
    > and even though I had four extras screw left over it has been working
    > fine for a few months now.


    Das Machine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen
    der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken. Ist nicht
    fur gewerken by das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren musten keepen
    das cotten-pickenen hands in das pockets - relaxen und watchen das
    blinkenlights.
    PhotoMan, Oct 19, 2004
    #5
  6. bugbear

    bugbear Guest

    PhotoMan wrote:
    >
    >
    > Das Machine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen
    > der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken. Ist nicht
    > fur gewerken by das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren musten keepen
    > das cotten-pickenen hands in das pockets - relaxen und watchen das
    > blinkenlights.
    >
    >


    Given the current functionality of my A60,
    I can't make it work any less.

    In the words of Yazz - "The only way is up!"

    BugBear
    bugbear, Oct 19, 2004
    #6
  7. bugbear

    tomcas Guest

    PhotoMan wrote:

    >
    > Das Machine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen
    > der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken. Ist nicht
    > fur gewerken by das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren musten keepen
    > das cotten-pickenen hands in das pockets - relaxen und watchen das
    > blinkenlights.
    >
    >

    That's pretty funny, not real helpful, but still funny.
    tomcas, Oct 20, 2004
    #7
  8. bugbear

    bugbear Guest

    tomcas wrote:
    > PhotoMan wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Das Machine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy
    >> schnappen
    >> der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken. Ist
    >> nicht
    >> fur gewerken by das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren musten
    >> keepen
    >> das cotten-pickenen hands in das pockets - relaxen und watchen das
    >> blinkenlights.
    >>
    >>

    > That's pretty funny, not real helpful, but still funny.


    And very old; this places it around 1958.

    http://www.columbia.edu/acis/history/650.html

    BugBear
    bugbear, Oct 20, 2004
    #8
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Sameh Saeb

    Canon PowerShot A60 Flash problem

    Sameh Saeb, Jul 20, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    833
    Don Coon
    Jul 21, 2003
  2. Bill

    Canon Powershot A60

    Bill, Jul 31, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    395
  3. Sexy Susan

    Re: Canon Powershot A60 vs. Canon Powershot A70

    Sexy Susan, Sep 18, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    391
    Browntimdc
    Sep 22, 2003
  4. KOS
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    507
    Darius Alexander
    Sep 25, 2003
  5. Andrys Basten

    Re: Canon Powershot A60 vs. Canon Powershot A70

    Andrys Basten, Oct 15, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    465
    Timothy Lange
    Oct 15, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page