Canon 40D and 5D vs. Nikon D40 and D300

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by beginner1.mat@hotmail.com, Jul 19, 2008.

  1. Guest

    I am looking to get my first SLR camera (I have been using point and
    shoot to this point) and was wondering what I should get. I have been
    reading numerous websites, but would like some info from people who
    use these cameras. I have read ken rockwell's website and noticed he
    highly recommends the Nikon D40 for novices. How would the Canon rate
    to the Nikon...can they even be compared?

    I will have 2 primary purposes for the camera:

    1) I want to primarily take nice family photos, especially close ups
    that focus on the person and everything else is blurred in the
    background. I would also like to be able to take good pics in low
    light (in the house).

    2) Wide angle scenic type of photos

    I was told that the auto focus feature on the D40 will not work with
    many lenses, and that was somewhat of a concern to me. As lenses seem
    to be a large part, does one company make better lenses for what I
    would need than others? Any input would be greatly appreciated.
     
    , Jul 19, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Guest

    On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 09:58:38 -0700 (PDT), in rec.photo.digital
    wrote:

    >highly recommends the Nikon D40 for novices. How would the Canon rate
    >to the Nikon...can they even be compared?


    No. You should compare the 40D to the D300 and the 5D to the recently
    announced D700.
     
    , Jul 19, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. ransley Guest

    On Jul 19, 11:58 am, wrote:
    > I am looking to get my first SLR camera (I have been using point and
    > shoot to this point) and was wondering what I should get.  I have been
    > reading numerous websites, but would like some info from people who
    > use these cameras.  I have read ken rockwell's website and noticed he
    > highly recommends the Nikon D40 for novices.  How would the Canon rate
    > to the Nikon...can they even be compared?
    >
    > I will have 2 primary purposes for the camera:
    >
    > 1)  I want to primarily take nice family photos, especially close ups
    > that focus on the person and everything else is blurred in the
    > background.  I would also like to be able to take good pics in low
    > light (in the house).
    >
    > 2)  Wide angle scenic type of photos
    >
    > I was told that the auto focus feature on the D40 will not work with
    > many lenses, and that was somewhat of a concern to me.  As lenses seem
    > to be a large part, does one company make better lenses for what I
    > would need than others?  Any input would be greatly appreciated.


    Have you tried www.dpreview.com they do indepth reviews. The new
    rebel xsi has the new 12.2 mp sensor the 40d replacement will probably
    get. The 40d and 5d will probably be upgraded fairly soon. The 5d is
    an amazing camera. for scenery. Nikon and Canon are all good
     
    ransley, Jul 19, 2008
    #3
  4. tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 09:58:38 -0700 (PDT),
    wrote:

    >I am looking to get my first SLR camera (I have been using point and
    >shoot to this point) and was wondering what I should get. I have been
    >reading numerous websites, but would like some info from people who
    >use these cameras. I have read ken rockwell's website and noticed he
    >highly recommends the Nikon D40 for novices. How would the Canon rate
    >to the Nikon...can they even be compared?
    >
    >I will have 2 primary purposes for the camera:
    >
    >1) I want to primarily take nice family photos, especially close ups
    >that focus on the person and everything else is blurred in the
    >background. I would also like to be able to take good pics in low
    >light (in the house).
    >
    >2) Wide angle scenic type of photos
    >
    >I was told that the auto focus feature on the D40 will not work with
    >many lenses, and that was somewhat of a concern to me.


    It should be a concern for you *if* you presently own lenses that you
    plan to use on the D40. However, if you order the standard D40 kit
    combination of a D40 with the standard 18-55 lens that comes with it,
    there won't be a problem. If you need a longer lens, Nikon offers a
    55-200 that autofocuses.

    Based on what you have said you want to do, the lens issue will not be
    a problem.

    "Wide angle scenic" is a bit vague coming from someone who has been
    using a P&S. Nikon makes a true autofocussing wide-angle lens (12-24)
    for the D40, but I get the impression that the standard kit lens of
    18-55 will produce what you want.

    This newsgroup can be fussy about terms. To some, if you say "wide
    angle", you *must* be talking about a dedicated wide angle lens.
    Others will understand if you mean just a basic photograph of the
    scenery with a regular lens.

    No comment on Nikon vs other brands or comparison of lens quality.
    That's a dick waving contest. Usually, the people who champion a
    particular brand do so because that's what they own.

    I do own a Nikon D40 with both the 18-55 and the 55-200 lenses. I'm
    very happy with the camera.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jul 19, 2008
    #4
  5. tony cooper wrote:
    []
    > I do own a Nikon D40 with both the 18-55 and the 55-200 lenses. I'm
    > very happy with the camera.


    Same here, and I bought an extra 70 - 300mm image-stabilised Nikon lens as
    I take quite a few long-distance, telephoto shots. The 6MP is more than
    enough for my purposes.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jul 19, 2008
    #5
  6. Steve Guest

    On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 13:33:26 -0400, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 09:58:38 -0700 (PDT),
    >wrote:

    [...]
    >>I was told that the auto focus feature on the D40 will not work with
    >>many lenses, and that was somewhat of a concern to me.

    >
    >It should be a concern for you *if* you presently own lenses that you
    >plan to use on the D40. However, if you order the standard D40 kit


    Even if you don't currently own any lenses, it is a concern if you
    want to take advantage of the large number of very high quality but
    older Nikon AF lenses that aren't AF-S or AF-I on ebay, craigslist,
    etc. for reasonable prices compared to new ones. I suppose the
    average D40 owner wouldn't care all that much about that though. But
    if you haven't bought your camera yet and think there's even a remote
    possibility that you might get seriously into photography as a hobby,
    I'd go with something that can use the AF lenses. If the D300 isn't
    in your budget, maybe a used D200. There's tons of them out there for
    not much more than a D40x and it's an incredibly more capable camera.

    Then again, I know novices who bought too much camera and end up
    frustrated because tbey don't know how to use it. If that's you, then
    a D40 is the better choice and don't worry about gathering a big lens
    collection.

    Steve
     
    Steve, Jul 19, 2008
    #6
  7. Roy G Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am looking to get my first SLR camera (I have been using point and
    > shoot to this point) and was wondering what I should get. I have been
    > reading numerous websites, but would like some info from people who
    > use these cameras. I have read ken rockwell's website and noticed he
    > highly recommends the Nikon D40 for novices. How would the Canon rate
    > to the Nikon...can they even be compared?
    >
    > I will have 2 primary purposes for the camera:
    >
    > 1) I want to primarily take nice family photos, especially close ups
    > that focus on the person and everything else is blurred in the
    > background. I would also like to be able to take good pics in low
    > light (in the house).
    >
    > 2) Wide angle scenic type of photos
    >
    > I was told that the auto focus feature on the D40 will not work with
    > many lenses, and that was somewhat of a concern to me. As lenses seem
    > to be a large part, does one company make better lenses for what I
    > would need than others? Any input would be greatly appreciated.



    There is no point in considering which make / model to buy, until you have
    gone to a shop and tried handling the ones which might interest you.

    Some might well be too heavy / light, have the controls placed for smaller /
    larger hands, etc, etc.

    If you don't enjoy handling a camera, then you won't enjoy using it, and
    that would defeat the whole point of buying one.

    Roy G
     
    Roy G, Jul 19, 2008
    #7
  8. measekite Guest

    wrote:
    > I am looking to get my first SLR camera (I have been using point and
    > shoot to this point) and was wondering what I should get. I have been
    > reading numerous websites, but would like some info from people who
    > use these cameras. I have read ken rockwell's website and noticed he
    > highly recommends the Nikon D40 for novices. How would the Canon rate
    > to the Nikon...can they even be compared?
    >


    For more money I like the Canon XSi aka 450D.
    > I will have 2 primary purposes for the camera:
    >
    > 1) I want to primarily take nice family photos, especially close ups
    > that focus on the person and everything else is blurred in the
    > background. I would also like to be able to take good pics in low
    > light (in the house).
    >
    > 2) Wide angle scenic type of photos
    >
    > I was told that the auto focus feature on the D40 will not work with
    > many lenses, and that was somewhat of a concern to me. As lenses seem
    > to be a large part, does one company make better lenses for what I
    > would need than others? Any input would be greatly appreciated.
    >


    While I would prefer the Canon XSi as a first choice and the newly
    announced Canon XS as maybe a second also look at the Nikon D60. See
    what feels best to you. I think that Canon has a wider choice of
    moderately price lenses.

    However, you can take a series of pictures with any of the
    aforementioned Canons or Nikons and print out 8.5x11 photos on a high
    quality Canon or Epson printer and while you may see some differences
    that you may or may not fancy in color etc I would say the quality of
    the results of one are no better than the other and you probably will
    not be able to say what camera produced which photo. They are both that
    good.

    Still if the Canon XSi feels good to you I think it would be hard to beat.
     
    measekite, Jul 20, 2008
    #8
  9. measekite Guest

    ransley wrote:
    > On Jul 19, 11:58 am, wrote:
    >
    >> I am looking to get my first SLR camera (I have been using point and
    >> shoot to this point) and was wondering what I should get. I have been
    >> reading numerous websites, but would like some info from people who
    >> use these cameras. I have read ken rockwell's website and noticed he
    >> highly recommends the Nikon D40 for novices. How would the Canon rate
    >> to the Nikon...can they even be compared?
    >>
    >> I will have 2 primary purposes for the camera:
    >>
    >> 1) I want to primarily take nice family photos, especially close ups
    >> that focus on the person and everything else is blurred in the
    >> background. I would also like to be able to take good pics in low
    >> light (in the house).
    >>
    >> 2) Wide angle scenic type of photos
    >>
    >> I was told that the auto focus feature on the D40 will not work with
    >> many lenses, and that was somewhat of a concern to me. As lenses seem
    >> to be a large part, does one company make better lenses for what I
    >> would need than others? Any input would be greatly appreciated.
    >>

    >
    > Have you tried www.dpreview.com they do indepth reviews. The new
    > rebel xsi has the new 12.2 mp sensor the 40d replacement will probably
    > get. The 40d and 5d will probably be upgraded fairly soon. The 5d is
    > an amazing camera. for scenery. Nikon and Canon are all good
    >

    I would say the 5D replacement is rather imminent but I do not think the
    40D will be replaced soon.
     
    measekite, Jul 20, 2008
    #9
  10. measekite Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:
    > tony cooper wrote:
    > []
    >
    >> I do own a Nikon D40 with both the 18-55 and the 55-200 lenses. I'm
    >> very happy with the camera.
    >>

    >
    > Same here, and I bought an extra 70 - 300mm image-stabilised Nikon lens as
    > I take quite a few long-distance, telephoto shots. The 6MP is more than
    > enough for my purposes.
    >
    > David
    >
    >

    If you go Nikon I would look at getting it with the 18-200 DX VR lens.
     
    measekite, Jul 20, 2008
    #10
  11. measekite Guest

    Steve wrote:
    > On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 13:33:26 -0400, tony cooper
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 09:58:38 -0700 (PDT),
    >> wrote:
    >>

    > [...]
    >
    >>> I was told that the auto focus feature on the D40 will not work with
    >>> many lenses, and that was somewhat of a concern to me.
    >>>

    >> It should be a concern for you *if* you presently own lenses that you
    >> plan to use on the D40. However, if you order the standard D40 kit
    >>

    >
    > Even if you don't currently own any lenses, it is a concern if you
    > want to take advantage of the large number of very high quality but
    > older Nikon AF lenses that aren't AF-S or AF-I on ebay, craigslist,
    > etc. for reasonable prices compared to new ones. I suppose the
    > average D40 owner wouldn't care all that much about that though. But
    > if you haven't bought your camera yet and think there's even a remote
    > possibility that you might get seriously into photography as a hobby,
    > I'd go with something that can use the AF lenses. If the D300 isn't
    > in your budget, maybe a used D200. There's tons of them out there for
    > not much more than a D40x and it's an incredibly more capable camera.
    >
    > Then again, I know novices who bought too much camera and end up
    > frustrated because tbey don't know how to use it.


    I can never understand how one can get too much camera and get
    frustrated. You can take almost all of the consumer DSLRs and put it on
    Auto or Program and just frame the subject and press the button. And
    you cam also use Portrait or Landscape settings. You can get great
    photos doing that with out even reading the manual.
    > If that's you, then
    > a D40 is the better choice and don't worry about gathering a big lens
    > collection.
    >
    > Steve
    >
     
    measekite, Jul 20, 2008
    #11
  12. measekite wrote:
    > David J Taylor wrote:
    >> tony cooper wrote:
    >> []
    >>
    >>> I do own a Nikon D40 with both the 18-55 and the 55-200 lenses. I'm
    >>> very happy with the camera.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Same here, and I bought an extra 70 - 300mm image-stabilised Nikon
    >> lens as I take quite a few long-distance, telephoto shots. The 6MP
    >> is more than enough for my purposes.
    >>
    >> David
    >>
    >>

    > If you go Nikon I would look at getting it with the 18-200 DX VR lens.


    Yes, I was tempted by that myself, and as a single carry-round kit it
    probably can't be beaten. Had that pairing been offered as a "kit", it's
    probably what I would have got.

    But with the kit 18-55mm you get better close-up and a much more compact
    and lightweight outfit, and with the 70-300mm a greater telephoto! Were I
    buying today, I might consider the 16-85mm VR and 70-300mm VR as my ideal
    2-lens outfit. I do like VR (in-lens image stabilisation).

    I would also agree with the comments that others have made - compare the
    handling of the different brands and different cameras in the shop.
    Handling was why I chose Nikon over Canon - I had no baggage of existing
    lenses making the choice for me. I don't think you would go wrong with
    either Canon or Nikon DSLRs.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jul 20, 2008
    #12
  13. Steve Guest

    On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 23:20:01 -0700, measekite <>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >Steve wrote:
    >> On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 13:33:26 -0400, tony cooper
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 09:58:38 -0700 (PDT),
    >>> wrote:
    >>>

    >> [...]
    >>
    >>>> I was told that the auto focus feature on the D40 will not work with
    >>>> many lenses, and that was somewhat of a concern to me.
    >>>>
    >>> It should be a concern for you *if* you presently own lenses that you
    >>> plan to use on the D40. However, if you order the standard D40 kit
    >>>

    >>
    >> Even if you don't currently own any lenses, it is a concern if you
    >> want to take advantage of the large number of very high quality but
    >> older Nikon AF lenses that aren't AF-S or AF-I on ebay, craigslist,
    >> etc. for reasonable prices compared to new ones. I suppose the
    >> average D40 owner wouldn't care all that much about that though. But
    >> if you haven't bought your camera yet and think there's even a remote
    >> possibility that you might get seriously into photography as a hobby,
    >> I'd go with something that can use the AF lenses. If the D300 isn't
    >> in your budget, maybe a used D200. There's tons of them out there for
    >> not much more than a D40x and it's an incredibly more capable camera.
    >>
    >> Then again, I know novices who bought too much camera and end up
    >> frustrated because tbey don't know how to use it.

    >
    >I can never understand how one can get too much camera and get
    >frustrated. You can take almost all of the consumer DSLRs and put it on
    >Auto or Program and just frame the subject and press the button. And
    >you cam also use Portrait or Landscape settings. You can get great
    >photos doing that with out even reading the manual.


    I don't understand it either, but I've seen it. Cameras like the D200
    and above don't have a Portrait or Landscape setting. No little
    running man on a dial for action shots. No flower on a dial for
    macro. No mountain on a dial for landscape. It does have a program
    mode that works well if all you want to do is take snapshots like a
    P&S. But if you want to simulate what those missing icons are doing,
    you have to know what they do in terms of shutter and aperature and
    set the camera up that way yourself.

    I guess some people who are used to those little icons on the dial
    miss them with an upper end DSLR.

    Steve
     
    Steve, Jul 20, 2008
    #13
  14. Steve <> wrote:

    > On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 23:20:01 -0700, measekite <>
    > wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 13:33:26 -0400, tony cooper
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>> On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 09:58:38 -0700 (PDT),
    >>>> wrote:


    >>> Then again, I know novices who bought too much camera and end up
    >>> frustrated because tbey don't know how to use it.

    >>
    >>I can never understand how one can get too much camera and get
    >>frustrated. You can take almost all of the consumer DSLRs and put it on
    >>Auto or Program and just frame the subject and press the button. And
    >>you cam also use Portrait or Landscape settings. You can get great
    >>photos doing that with out even reading the manual.


    > I don't understand it either, but I've seen it. Cameras like the D200
    > and above don't have a Portrait or Landscape setting. No little
    > running man on a dial for action shots. No flower on a dial for
    > macro. No mountain on a dial for landscape. It does have a program
    > mode that works well if all you want to do is take snapshots like a
    > P&S. But if you want to simulate what those missing icons are doing,
    > you have to know what they do in terms of shutter and aperature and
    > set the camera up that way yourself.


    > I guess some people who are used to those little icons on the dial
    > miss them with an upper end DSLR.


    There's also those ambitious folk who buy a DSLR and shoot in manual
    mode because they've been told that's how you get the best results,
    but unfortunately all their exposures are way off. Rather like those
    folk who get a manual gear shift car for the first time and complain
    after having driven hundreds of miles in second gear.

    --
    Chris Malcolm DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
    Chris Malcolm, Jul 20, 2008
    #14
  15. tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 07:36:49 GMT, Steve <> wrote:

    >I don't understand it either, but I've seen it. Cameras like the D200
    >and above don't have a Portrait or Landscape setting. No little
    >running man on a dial for action shots. No flower on a dial for
    >macro. No mountain on a dial for landscape. It does have a program
    >mode that works well if all you want to do is take snapshots like a
    >P&S. But if you want to simulate what those missing icons are doing,
    >you have to know what they do in terms of shutter and aperature and
    >set the camera up that way yourself.
    >
    >I guess some people who are used to those little icons on the dial
    >miss them with an upper end DSLR.
    >

    I've been using my Nikon D40 for some time now, and I've yet to use
    any of the Scene settings. I probably should try them just to see if
    they do offer any advantage. I'll have to look for locations and
    situations where the Scene options would be appropriate and take shots
    for comparison.

    I've also yet to use any of the in-camera enhancements listed under
    Optimize Image.
    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jul 20, 2008
    #15
  16. tony cooper wrote:
    []
    > I've been using my Nikon D40 for some time now, and I've yet to use
    > any of the Scene settings. I probably should try them just to see if
    > they do offer any advantage. I'll have to look for locations and
    > situations where the Scene options would be appropriate and take shots
    > for comparison.
    >
    > I've also yet to use any of the in-camera enhancements listed under
    > Optimize Image.


    I've used the close-up setting a few times, but like you, none of the
    in-camera enhancements.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jul 20, 2008
    #16
  17. ASAAR Guest

    On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 06:26:52 GMT, David J Taylor wrote:

    > But with the kit 18-55mm you get better close-up and a much more compact
    > and lightweight outfit, and with the 70-300mm a greater telephoto! Were I
    > buying today, I might consider the 16-85mm VR and 70-300mm VR as my ideal
    > 2-lens outfit. I do like VR (in-lens image stabilisation).


    A good 3 lens kit might add Sigma's 10-20mm or Tokina's 11-16mm
    lens to the 16-85mm and 70-300mm lenses. That said, the 55-200mm VR
    is also a good lens and with its much smaller size and weight (not
    to mention cost) goes well with the similarly small D40. While in
    no way as convenient as a small P&S, I can still see people taking a
    D40 and 55-200mm to places where it would be too much trouble to
    take the 70-300mm lens. While I don't know the particulars, some
    U.S.A. ball parks allow visitors to bring and use cameras unless
    they seem too "pro", which is a risk that the large 70-300mm adds.
     
    ASAAR, Jul 20, 2008
    #17
  18. ASAAR Guest

    On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 20:30:25 GMT, Steve wrote:

    > Even if you don't currently own any lenses, it is a concern if you
    > want to take advantage of the large number of very high quality but
    > older Nikon AF lenses that aren't AF-S or AF-I on ebay, craigslist,
    > etc. for reasonable prices compared to new ones. I suppose the
    > average D40 owner wouldn't care all that much about that though.
    > But if you haven't bought your camera yet and think there's even a
    > remote possibility that you might get seriously into photography as
    > a hobby, I'd go with something that can use the AF lenses.


    It's not as if someone seriously getting into photography will
    start collecting only lenses. Those that currently use a D50, D70
    or even a D80 which can AF with more lenses than the D40, if they
    follow that route are much more likely to want to eventually add a
    more "serious" camera body as well. Many photographers that have
    already moved up to a D200 or D300 haven't sold or retired their
    older D70s and D50s and still use them where appropriate or
    convenient. For those that won't be getting "seriously into
    photography", there are still enough fully functional, affordable
    AF-S lenses available to meet practically all needs.


    > Then again, I know novices who bought too much camera and
    > end up frustrated because tbey don't know how to use it.


    I know that guy too, the one that lives at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.,
    right? But not to worry. First, he didn't pay for it and two, his
    wife can always set it for him, except for when he's away with the
    boys zipping around on a golf cart.
     
    ASAAR, Jul 20, 2008
    #18
  19. measekite Guest

    Steve wrote:
    > On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 23:20:01 -0700, measekite <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Steve wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 13:33:26 -0400, tony cooper
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 09:58:38 -0700 (PDT),
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> [...]
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>> I was told that the auto focus feature on the D40 will not work with
    >>>>> many lenses, and that was somewhat of a concern to me.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>> It should be a concern for you *if* you presently own lenses that you
    >>>> plan to use on the D40. However, if you order the standard D40 kit
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Even if you don't currently own any lenses, it is a concern if you
    >>> want to take advantage of the large number of very high quality but
    >>> older Nikon AF lenses that aren't AF-S or AF-I on ebay, craigslist,
    >>> etc. for reasonable prices compared to new ones. I suppose the
    >>> average D40 owner wouldn't care all that much about that though. But
    >>> if you haven't bought your camera yet and think there's even a remote
    >>> possibility that you might get seriously into photography as a hobby,
    >>> I'd go with something that can use the AF lenses. If the D300 isn't
    >>> in your budget, maybe a used D200. There's tons of them out there for
    >>> not much more than a D40x and it's an incredibly more capable camera.
    >>>
    >>> Then again, I know novices who bought too much camera and end up
    >>> frustrated because tbey don't know how to use it.
    >>>

    >> I can never understand how one can get too much camera and get
    >> frustrated. You can take almost all of the consumer DSLRs and put it on
    >> Auto or Program and just frame the subject and press the button. And
    >> you cam also use Portrait or Landscape settings. You can get great
    >> photos doing that with out even reading the manual.
    >>

    >
    > I don't understand it either, but I've seen it. Cameras like the D200
    > and above don't have a Portrait or Landscape setting. No little
    > running man on a dial for action shots. No flower on a dial for
    > macro. No mountain on a dial for landscape. It does have a program
    > mode that works well if all you want to do is take snapshots like a
    > P&S. But if you want to simulate what those missing icons are doing,
    > you have to know what they do in terms of shutter and aperature and
    > set the camera up that way yourself.
    >
    > I guess some people who are used to those little icons on the dial
    > miss them with an upper end DSLR.
    >
    > Steve
    >

    But the D200/300 was not part of this discussion. I believe that the
    Canon XSi and below and the Nikon D60 and below have those features and
    they can all be used as a simple point and shoot with interchangeable
    lenses.
     
    measekite, Jul 21, 2008
    #19
  20. measekite Guest

    Chris Malcolm wrote:
    > Steve <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 23:20:01 -0700, measekite <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>> On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 13:33:26 -0400, tony cooper
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 09:58:38 -0700 (PDT),
    >>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>

    >
    >
    >>>> Then again, I know novices who bought too much camera and end up
    >>>> frustrated because tbey don't know how to use it.
    >>>>
    >>> I can never understand how one can get too much camera and get
    >>> frustrated. You can take almost all of the consumer DSLRs and put it on
    >>> Auto or Program and just frame the subject and press the button. And
    >>> you cam also use Portrait or Landscape settings. You can get great
    >>> photos doing that with out even reading the manual.
    >>>

    >
    >
    >> I don't understand it either, but I've seen it. Cameras like the D200
    >> and above don't have a Portrait or Landscape setting. No little
    >> running man on a dial for action shots. No flower on a dial for
    >> macro. No mountain on a dial for landscape. It does have a program
    >> mode that works well if all you want to do is take snapshots like a
    >> P&S. But if you want to simulate what those missing icons are doing,
    >> you have to know what they do in terms of shutter and aperature and
    >> set the camera up that way yourself.
    >>

    >
    >
    >> I guess some people who are used to those little icons on the dial
    >> miss them with an upper end DSLR.
    >>

    >
    > There's also those ambitious folk who buy a DSLR and shoot in manual
    > mode because they've been told that's how you get the best results,
    > but unfortunately all their exposures are way off.

    Those folk usually know what they are doing.
    > Rather like those
    > folk who get a manual gear shift car for the first time and complain
    > after having driven hundreds of miles in second gear.
    >

    We are talking about cameras.
     
    measekite, Jul 21, 2008
    #20
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