Canon 10D Learning Curve

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Gary Ma, Jul 28, 2003.

  1. Gary Ma

    Gary Ma Guest

    Dear Group, this is my first post--please be patient. I've been using
    for 8 years a Canon AE-1 Program shooting regular over the counter film,
    handed down from my dad, and have taken a photo class in college. Last
    year I purchased a Fuji 3800 digital camera, and wasn't too happy with
    the shutter lag and lack of shutter speed control. In brief, I'm
    traveling for a month to China in September for the first and maybe only
    time, and I want to know if the Canon 10D is the right camera for me?
    I'm a young Interactive Media Developer--so new technology is never the
    problem, but how difficult would be the transition having used a manual
    focus camera all my photo life--not being familiar with 5 AF zones and
    what the histogram means? I don't want to waste money on feature I
    don't know how or take time to get a handle on. And what two lenses
    should I be looking to purchase given a limited budget? Thanks in
    advance for the opinions and suggestions.

    Gary
    Gary Ma, Jul 28, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Gary Ma

    Gavin Cato Guest

    You could always run it in manual focus mode, but AF ain't that hard :)

    I can't comment on cheapo lenses as I only know the nikon ones.

    cheers



    "Gary Ma" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Dear Group, this is my first post--please be patient. I've been using
    > for 8 years a Canon AE-1 Program shooting regular over the counter film,
    > handed down from my dad, and have taken a photo class in college. Last
    > year I purchased a Fuji 3800 digital camera, and wasn't too happy with
    > the shutter lag and lack of shutter speed control. In brief, I'm
    > traveling for a month to China in September for the first and maybe only
    > time, and I want to know if the Canon 10D is the right camera for me?
    > I'm a young Interactive Media Developer--so new technology is never the
    > problem, but how difficult would be the transition having used a manual
    > focus camera all my photo life--not being familiar with 5 AF zones and
    > what the histogram means? I don't want to waste money on feature I
    > don't know how or take time to get a handle on. And what two lenses
    > should I be looking to purchase given a limited budget? Thanks in
    > advance for the opinions and suggestions.
    >
    > Gary
    >
    Gavin Cato, Jul 28, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Gary Ma

    Lisa Horton Guest

    If you're comfortable shooting with the AE-1, you should be able to make
    the transition to a modern AF camera without undue trauma. The AF is,
    well, automatic, the focus points are just how you tell the camera where
    to focus. It's not rocket science.

    The histogram isn't a difficult tool, once you have a clue. Google this
    group for 10D and Histogram and you'll find what you need to know.

    Now, on a month long trip to a place that you're not familiar with,
    there's much to be said for a simple reliable camera that will not
    require nightly doses of electricity, or really anything other than a
    spare battery and a bunch of film.

    Balance that though, with the thought of traveling with film through
    airports whose scanners may not be as limited in power as those in the
    USA. You'll want fast film, for indoor shooting.

    The 24-85 that David suggested isn't a bad choice, likewise the Canon
    28-105/3.5-4.5 is a good starter choice. A 420EX flash is a good choice
    to start out with, and smaller/lighter/cheaper than the 550EX, with very
    little power difference.

    If you don't have a laptop and/or are not planning on having one with
    you, I'd suggest sticking with the film camera.

    Lisa

    Gary Ma wrote:
    >
    > Dear Group, this is my first post--please be patient. I've been using
    > for 8 years a Canon AE-1 Program shooting regular over the counter film,
    > handed down from my dad, and have taken a photo class in college. Last
    > year I purchased a Fuji 3800 digital camera, and wasn't too happy with
    > the shutter lag and lack of shutter speed control. In brief, I'm
    > traveling for a month to China in September for the first and maybe only
    > time, and I want to know if the Canon 10D is the right camera for me?
    > I'm a young Interactive Media Developer--so new technology is never the
    > problem, but how difficult would be the transition having used a manual
    > focus camera all my photo life--not being familiar with 5 AF zones and
    > what the histogram means? I don't want to waste money on feature I
    > don't know how or take time to get a handle on. And what two lenses
    > should I be looking to purchase given a limited budget? Thanks in
    > advance for the opinions and suggestions.
    >
    > Gary
    Lisa Horton, Jul 28, 2003
    #3
  4. Gary Ma <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > Dear Group, this is my first post--please be patient.


    Aren't we all! ;-)

    I've been using
    > for 8 years a Canon AE-1 Program shooting regular over the counter film,
    > handed down from my dad, and have taken a photo class in college.


    A very good start, indeed.

    Last
    > year I purchased a Fuji 3800 digital camera, and wasn't too happy with
    > the shutter lag and lack of shutter speed control.


    There is a tremendous difference in these areas between digital P&S
    and the 10D, just as you'd expect differences between a film P&S and
    your AE-1.

    In brief, I'm
    > traveling for a month to China in September for the first and maybe only
    > time, and I want to know if the Canon 10D is the right camera for me?


    I generally disuade anyone going on a trip of a lifetime to pick that
    time to begin using a new camera. If, however, you'd have time to
    learn the nuances of the camera beforehand, then it could be a
    worthwhile addition. Your AE-1 would cerainly be more convenient in
    terms of image storage (its on the film) and battery longevity (you
    will need to recharge the 10D battery daily and carry at least one
    fully charged spare). If you are also taking a laptop computer then
    the image storage may not be as much of an issue.

    > I'm a young Interactive Media Developer--so new technology is never the
    > problem, but how difficult would be the transition having used a manual
    > focus camera all my photo life--not being familiar with 5 AF zones and
    > what the histogram means?


    I think you could transition between a manual SLR and the 10D fairly
    easily. The learning curve is not too steep, in my opinion. The
    owner's manual for the camera is easy to understand. You can learn
    the nuances of Photoshop in time. Just save everything in RAW or
    Large/Fine JPEG, and burn it to a disc if at all possible.

    I don't want to waste money on feature I
    > don't know how or take time to get a handle on.


    If you shoot prolifically you can almost pay for the camera with the
    money you'll save in film processing and printing.

    And what two lenses
    > should I be looking to purchase given a limited budget?


    Canon EF 20-35/3.5-4.5, Canon EF 50/1.8, and Canon EF 75-300 IS.
    Those should cover all general phtography needs. If you don't need
    the wide-angle or long telephoto range, then the 28-135 IS may be a
    good choice. Your best bet is to divide the minimum and maximum focal
    length of lenses you use on your AE-1 by 1.6 (image sensor crop
    factor), then buy lenses for the 10D to cover that range.

    Thanks in
    > advance for the opinions and suggestions.
    >
    > Gary


    Have fun in China!

    Michael
    street shooter, Jul 28, 2003
    #4
  5. Gary Ma

    Todd Walker Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > Dear Group, this is my first post--please be patient. I've been using
    > for 8 years a Canon AE-1 Program shooting regular over the counter film,
    > handed down from my dad, and have taken a photo class in college. Last
    > year I purchased a Fuji 3800 digital camera, and wasn't too happy with
    > the shutter lag and lack of shutter speed control. In brief, I'm
    > traveling for a month to China in September for the first and maybe only
    > time, and I want to know if the Canon 10D is the right camera for me?
    > I'm a young Interactive Media Developer--so new technology is never the
    > problem, but how difficult would be the transition having used a manual
    > focus camera all my photo life--not being familiar with 5 AF zones and
    > what the histogram means? I don't want to waste money on feature I
    > don't know how or take time to get a handle on. And what two lenses
    > should I be looking to purchase given a limited budget? Thanks in
    > advance for the opinions and suggestions.
    >
    > Gary


    Only you can answer the question of whether it is right for you. But I
    can help you with lenses. A few to consider:

    50mm f/1.8 -- $70 (this is a must have)
    28-135IS USM -- $400
    24-85 USM -- $300 (a little more compact than the 28-135 but no IS)
    75-300IS USM -- $415 (and there is a $25.00 rebate on it right now.)
    70-200 f/4 L -- $550

    My 10D and 50mm f/1.8 will be here Wednesday. I will be ordering the 28-
    135IS around the middle of this week. My next lens will be either the
    75-300IS or the 70-200 f/4 L. Those lenses will cover me from 45mm to
    480mm (or 320mm if I go with the 70-200,) taking the 1.6x multiplier
    into account.

    --
    ________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://twalker.d2g.com
    Canon 10D on the way
    Canon G2
    My Digital Photography Weblog:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    _________________________________
    Todd Walker, Jul 28, 2003
    #5
  6. If it's a once-in-a-lifetime trip with a 10D, I'd recommend learning about
    "blown-out highlights" well before you go. Whilst I love my 10D, it's a lot
    less forgiving than my EOS3 & film, and lost highlights are gone forever. Very
    many users routinely set exposure compensation at -1/2 stop (or even -2/3 stop)
    to guard against this.
    --
    M Stewart
    Milton Keynes, UK
    www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm

    Gary Ma <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Dear Group, this is my first post--please be patient. I've been using
    > for 8 years a Canon AE-1 Program shooting regular over the counter film,
    > handed down from my dad, and have taken a photo class in college. Last
    > year I purchased a Fuji 3800 digital camera, and wasn't too happy with

    snip
    Malcolm Stewart, Jul 28, 2003
    #6
  7. Gary Ma

    peter Guest

    There are storage devices with built-in hard disk to read and store photos
    from your compact flash cards. They are smaller than laptops to carry
    acound. E.g. http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nixvuevista/

    With digital, you have to be sure everything (chargers, adapters) would work
    on 220 volts AC in China, and you have the adapter to plug them into the
    outlet. And are you sure you want to lug around all those equipments
    (camera, laptop, lenses, flash, chargers, batteries) while on a trip? Do you
    worry about theft or do you intent to carry everything (including the laptop
    or the storage device) on you everywhere?

    If you like to shoot landscape, you'd want a wide angle lens. Let's say 28mm
    in the 35mm world. This translates to 28/1.6 = 17.5mm for the EOS 10D, so
    you want a zoom lens that covers 17.5mm.

    "Gary Ma" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Dear Group, this is my first post--please be patient. I've been using
    > for 8 years a Canon AE-1 Program shooting regular over the counter film,
    > handed down from my dad, and have taken a photo class in college. Last
    > year I purchased a Fuji 3800 digital camera, and wasn't too happy with
    > the shutter lag and lack of shutter speed control. In brief, I'm
    > traveling for a month to China in September for the first and maybe only
    > time, and I want to know if the Canon 10D is the right camera for me?
    > I'm a young Interactive Media Developer--so new technology is never the
    > problem, but how difficult would be the transition having used a manual
    > focus camera all my photo life--not being familiar with 5 AF zones and
    > what the histogram means? I don't want to waste money on feature I
    > don't know how or take time to get a handle on. And what two lenses
    > should I be looking to purchase given a limited budget? Thanks in
    > advance for the opinions and suggestions.
    >
    > Gary
    >
    peter, Jul 28, 2003
    #7
  8. Gary Ma

    Lionel Guest

    On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 08:30:00 +0100, in
    <bg2jdp$v2b$>, "Malcolm Stewart"
    <> said:

    >If it's a once-in-a-lifetime trip with a 10D, I'd recommend learning about
    >"blown-out highlights" well before you go. Whilst I love my 10D, it's a lot
    >less forgiving than my EOS3 & film, and lost highlights are gone forever. Very
    >many users routinely set exposure compensation at -1/2 stop (or even -2/3 stop)
    >to guard against this.


    Why don't you just shoot in RAW mode? I routinely recover 1 - 1.5 stops
    of blown highlights on my 10D with no loss whatsoever.

    --
    W
    . | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
    \|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
    ---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
    Lionel, Jul 28, 2003
    #8
  9. Gary Ma

    Rafe B. Guest

    On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 18:33:21 +1000, Lionel <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 08:30:00 +0100, in
    ><bg2jdp$v2b$>, "Malcolm Stewart"
    ><> said:
    >
    >>If it's a once-in-a-lifetime trip with a 10D, I'd recommend learning about
    >>"blown-out highlights" well before you go. Whilst I love my 10D, it's a lot
    >>less forgiving than my EOS3 & film, and lost highlights are gone forever. Very
    >>many users routinely set exposure compensation at -1/2 stop (or even -2/3 stop)
    >>to guard against this.

    >
    >Why don't you just shoot in RAW mode? I routinely recover 1 - 1.5 stops
    >of blown highlights on my 10D with no loss whatsoever.



    Would you please describe briefly how this is done?
    And special software involved?


    rafe b.
    http://www.terrapinphoto.com
    Rafe B., Jul 28, 2003
    #9
  10. peter wrote:

    > There are storage devices with built-in hard disk to read and store photos
    > from your compact flash cards. They are smaller than laptops to carry
    > acound. E.g. http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nixvuevista/
    >
    > With digital, you have to be sure everything (chargers, adapters) would work
    > on 220 volts AC in China, and you have the adapter to plug them into the
    > outlet. And are you sure you want to lug around all those equipments
    > (camera, laptop, lenses, flash, chargers, batteries) while on a trip? Do you
    > worry about theft or do you intent to carry everything (including the laptop
    > or the storage device) on you everywhere?
    >
    > If you like to shoot landscape, you'd want a wide angle lens. Let's say 28mm
    > in the 35mm world. This translates to 28/1.6 = 17.5mm for the EOS 10D, so
    > you want a zoom lens that covers 17.5mm.


    Check the 10D charger. Mine came with an auto sensing
    charger so all I needed was an adapter for the plug.

    On a recent 10-day trip to Italy, I took 6 charged
    batteries and about 4.5 gigabytes of compact flash.
    Using only jpeg I did not fill all flash. In 10 days,
    I only went through 3 batteries yet took a couple
    of thousand pictures.
    I only took one 28-135 mm IS lens. When I wanted a larger
    view, I took 2 or 3 frames (or more) to be mosaiced
    together later. This outfit was much smaller and
    less weight than my usual film load (2000 pictures
    = 55 rolls). 55 rolls weigh a lot and are quite
    bulky.

    The IS (image stabilization) lenses help shoot in low light
    situations, like inside buildings where you can't use a
    tripod. The 28-135 is quite sharp. You need to only get
    sharp lenses because the 10D has ~3 microns per pixel.
    Even some L lenses (e.g. the 100-400) are soft because
    of the fine pixel spacing. Be careful of zooms.

    You should have little trouble adapting from manual slr cameras.
    I shoot aperture priority mode most of the time, where one selects
    the aperture, the camera sets the exposure. With the 10D,
    learn to look at the image and check the histogram. The canon
    shows pixels overexposed as blinking dots. If you find that,
    simply use the exposure compensation dial and close down
    a stop or so and image again. It is really quite fast.

    Roger
    Photography, digital info at:
    http://www.clarkvision.com
    Roger N. Clark, Jul 28, 2003
    #10
  11. Gary Ma

    Nils Rostedt Guest

    In addition to the other good advice given here I'd add this, based on my
    own one months experience with the 10D (upgraded from an EOS300/Rebel):

    If you plan to make use of the camera's various capabilities, please make a
    habit of checking the camera settings before each shooting. Compared to your
    previous camera, the EOS 10D has a lot of user-selectable settings to
    consider, such as ISO sensitivity, white balance mode, focus point
    selection, exposure compensation (also for flash), autofocus mode, etcetera.
    While they give a lot of capabilities, it's quite easy to forget to reset
    them after use. Then you might wonder why your next pictures won't turn out
    the way you expect. It's also good to check on the LCD after your first
    shot(s) of each subject, to catch any wrong camera settings early.

    Of course you can avoid most of this problem by using only the basic modes
    of the camera in a point-and-shoot mode.

    My ?0.02

    NIls
    Nils Rostedt, Jul 28, 2003
    #11
  12. Gary Ma

    Todd Walker Guest

    In article <bg3ca8$k52qk$-berlin.de>,
    says...
    > Of course you can avoid most of this problem by using only the basic modes
    > of the camera in a point-and-shoot mode.
    >


    True but if you are going to do that, just buy a P&S in the first place.
    Why turn a $1500 digital SLR into a P&S? If you aren't going to take the
    time to learn to use it correctly, save your money.

    --
    ________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://twalker.d2g.com
    Canon 10D on the way
    Canon G2
    My Digital Photography Weblog:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    _________________________________
    Todd Walker, Jul 28, 2003
    #12
  13. > If you plan to make use of the camera's various capabilities, please make a
    > habit of checking the camera settings before each shooting. Compared to your
    > previous camera, the EOS 10D has a lot of user-selectable settings to
    > consider, such as ISO sensitivity, white balance mode, focus point
    > selection, exposure compensation (also for flash), autofocus mode, etcetera.
    > While they give a lot of capabilities, it's quite easy to forget to reset
    > them after use. Then you might wonder why your next pictures won't turn out
    > the way you expect. It's also good to check on the LCD after your first
    > shot(s) of each subject, to catch any wrong camera settings early.


    I'll second that. I'm used to just picking up a camera, setting the
    shutter speed & F/stop, and shooting. It's tough to remember white
    balance and all the other crap. But the rewards of remembering have
    been well worth it.
    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 28, 2003
    #13
  14. Gary Ma

    Lionel Guest

    On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 12:18:27 GMT, in
    <>, Rafe B.
    <> said:

    >On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 18:33:21 +1000, Lionel <> wrote:
    >>Why don't you just shoot in RAW mode? I routinely recover 1 - 1.5 stops
    >>of blown highlights on my 10D with no loss whatsoever.

    >
    >Would you please describe briefly how this is done?
    >And special software involved?


    Sure. You set your camera to RAW mode (RTFM) instead of JPEG, then set
    'exposure compensation' to whatever is appropriate for the shot when
    you're converting from RAW mode to TIFF or JPEG after downloading the
    images to your PC. If you don't want to spend anything on software, the
    Zoombrowser program that you got with the camera will work fine, but
    it's slow & clunky. I use either BreezeBrowser or Photoshop 7 with the
    tweaked version of the RAW plugin.
    RAW mode gives you at least a stop above & below the crappy 8 bit
    'normal' exposure range you get with JPEG. As a bonus, you can also
    post-correct the white balance, sharpness & colour model in the
    computer, with *no* information loss. Try doing /that/ with film. ;)
    The only drawback is that RAW image file are about 30% bigger than the
    highest quality JPEGs, but I promise you that it's worth it.

    Give it a try - you'll be amazed at what you can do with shots that
    you'd normally consider totally unusable.

    --
    W
    . | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
    \|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
    ---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
    Lionel, Jul 29, 2003
    #14
  15. Gary Ma

    Don Coon Guest

    "Lionel" <> wrote in message news:bg4b2r$cb6$...
    > On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 12:18:27 GMT, in
    > <>, Rafe B.
    > <> said:
    >
    > >On Mon, 28 Jul 2003 18:33:21 +1000, Lionel <> wrote:
    > >>Why don't you just shoot in RAW mode? I routinely recover 1 - 1.5 stops
    > >>of blown highlights on my 10D with no loss whatsoever.

    > >
    > >Would you please describe briefly how this is done?
    > >And special software involved?

    >
    > Sure. You set your camera to RAW mode (RTFM) instead of JPEG, then set
    > 'exposure compensation' to whatever is appropriate for the shot when
    > you're converting from RAW mode to TIFF or JPEG after downloading the
    > images to your PC. If you don't want to spend anything on software, the
    > Zoombrowser program that you got with the camera will work fine, but
    > it's slow & clunky. I use either BreezeBrowser or Photoshop 7 with the
    > tweaked version of the RAW plugin.
    > RAW mode gives you at least a stop above & below the crappy 8 bit
    > 'normal' exposure range you get with JPEG. As a bonus, you can also
    > post-correct the white balance, sharpness & colour model in the
    > computer, with *no* information loss. Try doing /that/ with film. ;)
    > The only drawback is that RAW image file are about 30% bigger than the
    > highest quality JPEGs, but I promise you that it's worth it.


    Huh -- 30%? Make that close to 300% bigger. Say 6.4MB vs 2.4MB +/-.

    >
    > Give it a try - you'll be amazed at what you can do with shots that
    > you'd normally consider totally unusable.
    >
    > --
    > W
    > . | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
    > \|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
    > ---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
    Don Coon, Jul 29, 2003
    #15
  16. Gary Ma

    Lionel Guest

    On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 01:47:08 GMT, in <wmkVa.2988$cF.921@rwcrnsc53>, "Don
    Coon" <coondw_nospam@hotmail_dot_.com> said:

    >"Lionel" <> wrote in message news:bg4b2r$cb6$...
    >> The only drawback is that RAW image file are about 30% bigger than the
    >> highest quality JPEGs, but I promise you that it's worth it.

    >
    >Huh -- 30%? Make that close to 300% bigger. Say 6.4MB vs 2.4MB +/-.


    That's 200% bigger, not 300%. And I typically get 3MB JPEGs (highest
    quality mode on my 10D), & RAWs of about 4MB or so. YMMV. The file size
    of either obviously varies with the subject, as always with compressed
    image formats. Higher ISO images tend to be larger in both formats, IME.

    --
    W
    . | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
    \|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
    ---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
    Lionel, Jul 29, 2003
    #16
  17. Gary Ma

    Fred Povey Guest

    In article <>, Todd
    Walker <> wrote:

    > In article <bg3ca8$k52qk$-berlin.de>,
    > says...
    > > Of course you can avoid most of this problem by using only the basic modes
    > > of the camera in a point-and-shoot mode.
    > >

    >
    > True but if you are going to do that, just buy a P&S in the first place.
    > Why turn a $1500 digital SLR into a P&S? If you aren't going to take the
    > time to learn to use it correctly, save your money.


    But you don't have to learn it all at once. I believe the original
    poster said something about going on a trip of a lifetime and being
    worried about the shots not coming out. If his/her intention is to
    eventually learn the advanced features, there's certainly no harm in
    getting started with a 10D and using it as a P&S at first, gradually
    using more and more of its capabilities.
    Fred Povey, Jul 29, 2003
    #17
  18. Gary Ma

    Don Coon Guest

    "Todd Walker" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <wmkVa.2988$cF.921@rwcrnsc53>, coondw_nospam@hotmail_dot_.com
    > says...
    > > Huh -- 30%? Make that close to 300% bigger. Say 6.4MB vs 2.4MB +/-.
    > >

    >
    > Lionel was probably referring to the G2/G3 RAW files which are only
    > about 30% larger, rather than the 10D files which are, as you say,
    > almost 3x as large.


    No, he was referring to the 10D. He averages 3MB per JPEG (same here) and
    4MB with RAW (more like 5 here) so they ARE closer than the 300% I
    mistakeningly typed.

    So Todd, how many days left? : ) You're in for a treat!


    >
    > --
    > ________________________________
    > Todd Walker
    > http://twalker.d2g.com
    > Canon 10D on the way
    > Canon G2
    > My Digital Photography Weblog:
    > http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    > _________________________________
    Don Coon, Jul 29, 2003
    #18
  19. Gary Ma

    Todd Walker Guest

    In article <74mVa.3362$Ho3.933@sccrnsc03>,
    coondw_nospam@hotmail_dot_.com says...
    > No, he was referring to the 10D. He averages 3MB per JPEG (same here) and
    > 4MB with RAW (more like 5 here) so they ARE closer than the 300% I
    > mistakeningly typed.
    >
    > So Todd, how many days left? : ) You're in for a treat!
    >


    Day after tomorrow. WAITING IS TORTURE!!! :)

    --
    ________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://twalker.d2g.com
    Canon 10D on the way
    Canon G2 <-- SOLD!
    My Digital Photography Weblog:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    _________________________________
    Todd Walker, Jul 29, 2003
    #19
  20. Gary Ma

    Lionel Guest

    On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 02:46:43 GMT, in
    <>, Todd Walker
    <> said:

    >In article <wmkVa.2988$cF.921@rwcrnsc53>, coondw_nospam@hotmail_dot_.com
    >says...
    >> Huh -- 30%? Make that close to 300% bigger. Say 6.4MB vs 2.4MB +/-.
    >>

    >
    >Lionel was probably referring to the G2/G3 RAW files which are only
    >about 30% larger, rather than the 10D files which are, as you say,
    >almost 3x as large.


    It's very kind of you to give me the benefit of the doubt, but I was
    referring to 10D files. If others are find the file sizes to be /that/
    different between RAW & JPEG, it may be that my typical subject matter
    (night shots at high ISOs - ie; lots of noise) may account for the file
    sizes I see.

    --
    W
    . | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
    \|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
    ---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
    Lionel, Jul 29, 2003
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Osiris Luxor

    Not a problem more of a challenge/learning curve

    Osiris Luxor, Feb 12, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    521
    chip_y2kuk
    Feb 12, 2004
  2. J. A. Mc.

    Re: The Learning curve of taking great pictures.

    J. A. Mc., Jul 10, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    756
    J. A. Mc.
    Jul 10, 2003
  3. John O.

    Re: The Learning curve of taking great pictures.

    John O., Jul 10, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    968
    S f S
    Jul 27, 2003
  4. John O.

    Re: The Learning curve of taking great pictures.

    John O., Jul 10, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    746
    John O.
    Jul 10, 2003
  5. John H. Power

    Intuous2 coming today - learning curve?

    John H. Power, Feb 3, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    345
    Fuzzy Logic
    Feb 5, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page