Canon 10D - Contrast, Sharpness and Saturation settings

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by nk, Mar 8, 2005.

  1. nk

    nk Guest

    Does anyone know of any web sites that talk about the Canon 10D - Contrast,
    Sharpness and Saturation settings? The 10D manual does not offer much
    information on it and at a photo class this weekend the speaker was not very
    fond of the settings in any of the cameras.

    Thanks.

    Nath Kaplan
     
    nk, Mar 8, 2005
    #1
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  2. nk

    rafeb Guest

    nk wrote:

    > Does anyone know of any web sites that talk about the Canon 10D -
    > Contrast, Sharpness and Saturation settings? The 10D manual does not
    > offer much information on it and at a photo class this weekend the
    > speaker was not very fond of the settings in any of the cameras.



    What's your concern? What's the question?

    I mean, the controls are obvious and self-evident.

    Perhaps less obvious is why you'd use these in-
    camera controls rather than apply them later on
    in an image editor.

    By habit, I'd leave these adjustments set to
    neutral, and apply them later, if at all.
    I see mostly a lot of risks and disadvantages
    to applying these adjustments "early."

    Better yet, shoot RAW and forget all these in-
    camera adjustments.


    rafe b.
    http://www.terrapinphot.com
     
    rafeb, Mar 9, 2005
    #2
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  3. nk

    Guest

    nk wrote:

    > Does anyone know of any web sites that talk about the Canon 10D -

    Contrast,
    > Sharpness and Saturation settings?


    No. The government has outlawed this form of speech.

    > The 10D manual does not offer much information on it and at a photo
    > class this weekend the speaker was not very fond of the settings in
    > any of the cameras.


    Check the US PATRIOT Act for details or the equivalent in your country
    (all countries have the equivalent). Even posting this question is
    borderline illegal now. The black helicopters are real!!!

    Now, I've heard that there are some radical crazy people who are trying
    these settings in camera and attempting to make their own decisions.
    The FBI (or your equivalent -- all countries have an FBI) is slowly but
    surely hunting down these proto-terrorists though. Free-thinking,
    experimentation, and learning outside official boundaries are no longer
    tolerated by the republic. Just sit in front of your TeeVee and await
    further instructions, comrade citizen!
     
    , Mar 9, 2005
    #3
  4. nk

    Bill Hilton Guest

    >Does anyone know of any web sites that talk about the Canon 10D -
    >Contrast, Sharpness and Saturation settings?


    Shoot RAW mode and apply these settings either with the RAW converter
    or with an image editing program. The in-camera settings are basically
    for jpegs so you don't want to be too aggressive applying them (since
    the RAW is thrown away), but if you shoot RAW you can convert multiple
    times with different settings.

    >at a photo class this weekend the speaker was not very
    >fond of the settings in any of the cameras.


    Most likely because he's shooting RAW and doesn't use the in-camera
    settings either.
     
    Bill Hilton, Mar 9, 2005
    #4
  5. nk

    paul Guest

    nk wrote:

    > Does anyone know of any web sites that talk about the Canon 10D -
    > Contrast, Sharpness and Saturation settings? The 10D manual does not
    > offer much information on it and at a photo class this weekend the
    > speaker was not very fond of the settings in any of the cameras.



    Do your own experiments. Try a series of the same scene with different
    settings and compare them. Then you will really know what's happening. I
    doubt anyone has a tutorial with samples to show as well as you could.

    As others mentioned, doing these in-camera is a timesaver to avoid later
    processing at the cost of limiting later processing capability. With the
    D70, (I think) those settings only apply in one of the preset modes
    (green, P, sports, etc) not in A, S, or Manual. So that's OK if you
    chose one of those modes, you get the quick-n-easy, or you can shoot
    more manually & have more latitude or raw for even more. I generally
    like max sharpening & some contrast boost but for low light, high ISO,
    the sharpening is a no-no & for high contrast scenes, the contrast
    should not be increased.

    BTW with RAW, you set all those things as a default, then change if it's
    a special situation. For most pics in good lighting, the defaults are
    great & it could have been processed in-camera. It's the 'difficult'
    situations where you should worry about switching to RAW or at least
    turning off in-camera adjustments.
     
    paul, Mar 9, 2005
    #5
  6. In article <GarXd.153$>, says...
    > Does anyone know of any web sites that talk about the Canon 10D - Contrast,
    > Sharpness and Saturation settings? The 10D manual does not offer much
    > information on it and at a photo class this weekend the speaker was not very
    > fond of the settings in any of the cameras.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > Nath Kaplan
    >

    As others are saying, try shooting RAW until you are used to the
    settings. This allows you to set the sharpness/contrast/saturation
    AFTER taking the photo so you can experiment - in JPEG mode you're stuck
    with the setting you chose at the time.

    By the way, people often regard a setting of 0/0/0 to be 'neutral' or
    'flat'. In fact, this setting applies boosted
    sharpness/contrast/saturation to the image. If you want as near to an
    unprocessed image as possible, use settings of -2/-2/-2 - even with
    these values, some sharpening has been done! If you do this, the images
    will almost certainly need post-processing but you then have full
    control over how it is done rather than relying on fixed preset values.
    It's more work, though...
     
    Graeme Cogger, Mar 9, 2005
    #6
  7. nk

    Confused Guest

    On Wed, 9 Mar 2005 12:56:11 -0000
    In message <>
    Graeme Cogger <> wrote:

    > As others are saying, try shooting RAW until you are used to the
    > settings. This allows you to set the sharpness/contrast/saturation
    > AFTER taking the photo so you can experiment - in JPEG mode you're stuck
    > with the setting you chose at the time.
    >
    > By the way, people often regard a setting of 0/0/0 to be 'neutral' or
    > 'flat'. In fact, this setting applies boosted
    > sharpness/contrast/saturation to the image. If you want as near to an
    > unprocessed image as possible, use settings of -2/-2/-2 - even with
    > these values, some sharpening has been done! If you do this, the images
    > will almost certainly need post-processing but you then have full
    > control over how it is done rather than relying on fixed preset values.
    > It's more work, though...


    I thought that in RAW mode, the n/n/n settings in the Canon cameras do
    not change the raw data, but are only used to build the imbedded (or
    additional) jpeg file and are used by converters to initialize default
    conversion settings. Am I wrong?

    Jeff
     
    Confused, Mar 9, 2005
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    net says...
    > On Wed, 9 Mar 2005 12:56:11 -0000
    > In message <>
    > Graeme Cogger <> wrote:
    >
    > > As others are saying, try shooting RAW until you are used to the
    > > settings. This allows you to set the sharpness/contrast/saturation
    > > AFTER taking the photo so you can experiment - in JPEG mode you're stuck
    > > with the setting you chose at the time.
    > >
    > > By the way, people often regard a setting of 0/0/0 to be 'neutral' or
    > > 'flat'. In fact, this setting applies boosted
    > > sharpness/contrast/saturation to the image. If you want as near to an
    > > unprocessed image as possible, use settings of -2/-2/-2 - even with
    > > these values, some sharpening has been done! If you do this, the images
    > > will almost certainly need post-processing but you then have full
    > > control over how it is done rather than relying on fixed preset values.
    > > It's more work, though...

    >
    > I thought that in RAW mode, the n/n/n settings in the Canon cameras do
    > not change the raw data, but are only used to build the imbedded (or
    > additional) jpeg file and are used by converters to initialize default
    > conversion settings. Am I wrong?
    >
    > Jeff
    >

    You're absolutely correct - sorry if I was causing confusion. The
    settings I was talking about are the ones you apply when you process the
    RAW file on the PC.
    In other words, you can either shoot in JPEG and have to set
    sharpness/contrast/saturation before you shoot; or you can shoot in RAW
    and experiment with the sharpness/contrast/saturation after the image is
    on the computer.
     
    Graeme Cogger, Mar 9, 2005
    #8
  9. nk

    Guest

    rafeb wrote:
    > nk wrote:
    > > Does anyone know of any web sites that talk about the Canon 10D -
    > > Contrast, Sharpness and Saturation settings? The 10D manual does

    not
    > > offer much information on it and at a photo class this weekend the
    > > speaker was not very fond of the settings in any of the cameras.

    >
    > By habit, I'd leave these adjustments set to
    > neutral


    Sharpening should not be set at 0, but -2.

    Contrast should be set by reviewing the histogram, to get the best
    dynamic range for the scene, without clipping highlight and shadow. All
    these troubles can be avoided by shooting raw.

    > Better yet, shoot RAW and forget all these in-
    > camera adjustments.


    Even when shooting raw, these settings still affect the JPEG imbedded
    in the raw, which is used to display the review and histogram. So
    sharpening still should be set to -2. Contrast should be set to -2 to
    make the review JPEG dynamic range close to the raw range.
     
    , Mar 11, 2005
    #9
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