Can you save a Java Home loan calulator applet that pops up off a site? if so how?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Southern Kiwi, May 20, 2006.

  1. --
    -- Cheers
    Southern Kiwi
    southern_kiwi@*spamsucks*hotmail.com
    Word of wisdom from high in the mountains....you know...like a Guru...but
    not as old....or mystic......or wise....or high... :)
     
    Southern Kiwi, May 20, 2006
    #1
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  2. Southern Kiwi

    Daniel Guest

    Re: Can you save a Java Home loan calulator applet that pops up offa site? if so how?

    Southern Kiwi wrote:

    Well, the classes can get cached...

    What's the URL?
     
    Daniel, May 20, 2006
    #2
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  3. Southern Kiwi

    Barry Phease Guest

    On Sat, 20 May 2006 16:28:55 +1200, Southern Kiwi wrote:

    You can get the source for the web page. That will show you the url for
    the applet to save. It will already be cached somewhere on your computer.

    You will need to rewrite the html (or use an applet viewer) to access the
    local version.

    Be aware that the applet may communicate with a back end program on the
    server, which may not work from a browser if you change to use it locally.

    --
    Barry Phease

    mailto:
    http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~barryp
     
    Barry Phease, May 20, 2006
    #3
  4. Re: Can you save a Java Home loan calulator applet that pops up offa site? if so how?

    Southern Kiwi wrote:
    >
    > Can you save a Java Home loan calculator applet that pops up off a
    > site? if so how?


    If it's a simple home loan calculator (like Kiwibank's for example), you
    can just do up something in a spreadsheet that achieves the exact same
    figures.


    For example (sorry if you're a spreadsheet whiz and know this), here's
    how to do two different loan calculations in Excel:

    What your repayments will be based on how the other variables:
    =PMT(Rate, Nper, Pv)

    The amount you can potentially borrow based on the other variables:
    =PV(Rate, Nper, Pmt)


    Rate is the interest rate per payment period. That's your interest rate
    per annum cell *divided* by your periods per annum cell (which would be
    on either 12, 26, or 52).

    Nper is the total number of payment periods. That's your periods per
    annum cell *multiplied* by your total years cell (which would usually be
    on either 25, or 30).

    Pv is your amount borrowed cell (it means Present Value IIRC).

    Pmt is your weekly/fortnightly/monthly repayment cell (set to what you
    can afford).


    Those functions will both give you negative values, if that annoys you,
    do =0-[one of the two functions].
     
    I'm A Trampoline, May 21, 2006
    #4
  5. Southern Kiwi

    -=rjh=- Guest

    Re: Can you save a Java Home loan calulator applet that pops up offa site? if so how?

    I'm A Trampoline wrote:
    > Southern Kiwi wrote:
    > >
    > > Can you save a Java Home loan calculator applet that pops up off a
    > > site? if so how?

    >
    > If it's a simple home loan calculator (like Kiwibank's for example), you
    > can just do up something in a spreadsheet that achieves the exact same
    > figures.


    I figure the OP has some reason for wanting to use a browser to do this,
    rather than a spreadsheet (seems strange) but anyway, no reason not to I
    guess. More people are familiar with browsers than with spreadsheets anyway.

    There are heaps of free calculator templates around for Calc and Excel,
    so you don't really have to know much about spreadsheets to get started,
    although a lot of people don't know how spreadsheets work, having never
    needed to use them.

    Also, instead of using a java app, a javascript would be all that is
    required, and again, there are heaps of free examples on the net. Or
    save any online working page with a calculator on it to Firefox's
    Scrapbook, and work it from there. Or save the page locally as normal.

    The Kiwibank example you give has the entire calculator in javascript in
    the page source (pretty generous, really) so it should be a doddle to
    use it from there. The javascript calculator is a lot more complex than
    most people will be bothered with if building a spreadsheet, even though
    the interface looks simple. It is also fast. I'd say it is a good
    example as it works offline with no messing around.
     
    -=rjh=-, May 21, 2006
    #5
  6. John in Surrey, May 21, 2006
    #6
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