Can you mix wired and unwired hardware in a simple home LAN

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by =?Utf-8?B?cGhhc3Rp?=, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. Can you mix wired and unwired PCs in a simply home LAN where 2 wired PCs and
    1 unwired laptop are plugged into a wired 4 port d-link router which is
    connected to a cable modem and thus to the Internet? How would the
    configuration look? I'm assuming the answer will be that I need a wireless
    router to accomodate the wireless laptop and I'm hoping that there are
    wireless routers which can accomodate both wired and wireless PCs because I
    don't want to have to get wireless adapters for the 2 PCs. Am I right?

    All PCs are running XP sp2.
    =?Utf-8?B?cGhhc3Rp?=, Dec 20, 2005
    #1
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  2. It might look like my current home mixed LAN using a Buffalo WBR-G54 4-Port
    Broadband Router/802.11b/g Wireless Access Point..

    http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/LAN/LAN.jpg

    ...or if you only wanted to purchase a wireless access point like this
    network...In this case the Buffalo is configured and used as a wireless
    access point only...

    http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/WM2003/PPTP_VPN/LAN/PPTPExampleLAN.html

    --

    Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

    Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual
    benefit of all of us...
    The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    rights...

    "phasti" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Can you mix wired and unwired PCs in a simply home LAN where 2 wired PCs
    > and
    > 1 unwired laptop are plugged into a wired 4 port d-link router which is
    > connected to a cable modem and thus to the Internet? How would the
    > configuration look? I'm assuming the answer will be that I need a
    > wireless
    > router to accomodate the wireless laptop and I'm hoping that there are
    > wireless routers which can accomodate both wired and wireless PCs because
    > I
    > don't want to have to get wireless adapters for the 2 PCs. Am I right?
    >
    > All PCs are running XP sp2.
    Sooner Al [MVP], Dec 20, 2005
    #2
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  3. What exactly is the function of the NAT (what's that mean?) router, i.e., why
    a separate router for the firewall function? Isn't that normally part of the
    function of routers? Doesn't the Buffalo router provide that function or
    worst case, couldn't you use a software firewall and get rid of the NAT
    router firewall function altogether?

    Beyond that concern and question, the diagrams help a lot. So, it looks
    like I can have a mxid environment but there is no wireless port off a
    standard router. I'd have to use one port with an ethernet connection to a
    separate wireless router and access point. Right? What does a wireless
    router/access point combination get me that a router alone wouldn't? Since I
    only want to go to a laptop, couldn't I just use a wireless router?

    Thanks for helping out!

    "Sooner Al [MVP]" wrote:

    > It might look like my current home mixed LAN using a Buffalo WBR-G54 4-Port
    > Broadband Router/802.11b/g Wireless Access Point..
    >
    > http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/LAN/LAN.jpg
    >
    > ...or if you only wanted to purchase a wireless access point like this
    > network...In this case the Buffalo is configured and used as a wireless
    > access point only...
    >
    > http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/WM2003/PPTP_VPN/LAN/PPTPExampleLAN.html
    >
    > --
    >
    > Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)
    >
    > Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual
    > benefit of all of us...
    > The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    > rights...
    >
    > "phasti" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Can you mix wired and unwired PCs in a simply home LAN where 2 wired PCs
    > > and
    > > 1 unwired laptop are plugged into a wired 4 port d-link router which is
    > > connected to a cable modem and thus to the Internet? How would the
    > > configuration look? I'm assuming the answer will be that I need a
    > > wireless
    > > router to accomodate the wireless laptop and I'm hoping that there are
    > > wireless routers which can accomodate both wired and wireless PCs because
    > > I
    > > don't want to have to get wireless adapters for the 2 PCs. Am I right?
    > >
    > > All PCs are running XP sp2.

    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?cGhhc3Rp?=, Dec 21, 2005
    #3
  4. =?Utf-8?B?cGhhc3Rp?=

    FG Guest

    I, for one, use a wireless router to connect my two computers to the
    Internet
    and between themselves.

    My router contains a firewall.

    I can also connect via RJ45 cables to one or more of the ports also present
    on the router.

    "phasti" <> a écrit dans le message de news:
    ...
    > What exactly is the function of the NAT (what's that mean?) router, i.e.,
    > why
    > a separate router for the firewall function? Isn't that normally part of
    > the
    > function of routers? Doesn't the Buffalo router provide that function or
    > worst case, couldn't you use a software firewall and get rid of the NAT
    > router firewall function altogether?
    >
    > Beyond that concern and question, the diagrams help a lot. So, it looks
    > like I can have a mxid environment but there is no wireless port off a
    > standard router. I'd have to use one port with an ethernet connection to
    > a
    > separate wireless router and access point. Right? What does a wireless
    > router/access point combination get me that a router alone wouldn't?
    > Since I
    > only want to go to a laptop, couldn't I just use a wireless router?
    >
    > Thanks for helping out!
    >
    > "Sooner Al [MVP]" wrote:
    >
    >> It might look like my current home mixed LAN using a Buffalo WBR-G54
    >> 4-Port
    >> Broadband Router/802.11b/g Wireless Access Point..
    >>
    >> http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/LAN/LAN.jpg
    >>
    >> ...or if you only wanted to purchase a wireless access point like this
    >> network...In this case the Buffalo is configured and used as a wireless
    >> access point only...
    >>
    >> http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/WM2003/PPTP_VPN/LAN/PPTPExampleLAN.html
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)
    >>
    >> Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual
    >> benefit of all of us...
    >> The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    >> This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    >> rights...
    >>
    >> "phasti" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Can you mix wired and unwired PCs in a simply home LAN where 2 wired
    >> > PCs
    >> > and
    >> > 1 unwired laptop are plugged into a wired 4 port d-link router which is
    >> > connected to a cable modem and thus to the Internet? How would the
    >> > configuration look? I'm assuming the answer will be that I need a
    >> > wireless
    >> > router to accomodate the wireless laptop and I'm hoping that there are
    >> > wireless routers which can accomodate both wired and wireless PCs
    >> > because
    >> > I
    >> > don't want to have to get wireless adapters for the 2 PCs. Am I right?
    >> >
    >> > All PCs are running XP sp2.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    FG, Dec 21, 2005
    #4
  5. The NAT (Network Address Translation) firewall function is actually built-in
    to the router, ie. both the Linksys or the Buffalo. I was simply trying to
    illustrate that a firewall, of some form, existed at that point. I guess the
    drawing would be clearer if I got rid of that or put a box around both the
    Linksys BEFSR41 and the firewall image.

    Both the Buffalo WBR-G54 and the Linksys BEFSR41 provide the same
    functionality except for the fact the Buffalo also has a wireless component.

    In your situation you could easily just use a combo wireless access
    point/router like the Buffalo illustrates in the first link. That is my
    normal network.

    The second network simply illustrates, or tries to, what a network would
    like if I used a purely wired broadband router for the internet front end
    and added a wireless access point (or in this case a combo wireless access
    point/router configured to act only as an access point) to the network.

    --

    Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)

    Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual
    benefit of all of us...
    The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    rights...

    "phasti" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What exactly is the function of the NAT (what's that mean?) router, i.e.,
    > why
    > a separate router for the firewall function? Isn't that normally part of
    > the
    > function of routers? Doesn't the Buffalo router provide that function or
    > worst case, couldn't you use a software firewall and get rid of the NAT
    > router firewall function altogether?
    >
    > Beyond that concern and question, the diagrams help a lot. So, it looks
    > like I can have a mxid environment but there is no wireless port off a
    > standard router. I'd have to use one port with an ethernet connection to
    > a
    > separate wireless router and access point. Right? What does a wireless
    > router/access point combination get me that a router alone wouldn't?
    > Since I
    > only want to go to a laptop, couldn't I just use a wireless router?
    >
    > Thanks for helping out!
    >
    > "Sooner Al [MVP]" wrote:
    >
    >> It might look like my current home mixed LAN using a Buffalo WBR-G54
    >> 4-Port
    >> Broadband Router/802.11b/g Wireless Access Point..
    >>
    >> http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/LAN/LAN.jpg
    >>
    >> ...or if you only wanted to purchase a wireless access point like this
    >> network...In this case the Buffalo is configured and used as a wireless
    >> access point only...
    >>
    >> http://theillustratednetwork.mvps.org/WM2003/PPTP_VPN/LAN/PPTPExampleLAN.html
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Al Jarvi (MS-MVP Windows Networking)
    >>
    >> Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual
    >> benefit of all of us...
    >> The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    >> This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    >> rights...
    >>
    >> "phasti" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Can you mix wired and unwired PCs in a simply home LAN where 2 wired
    >> > PCs
    >> > and
    >> > 1 unwired laptop are plugged into a wired 4 port d-link router which is
    >> > connected to a cable modem and thus to the Internet? How would the
    >> > configuration look? I'm assuming the answer will be that I need a
    >> > wireless
    >> > router to accomodate the wireless laptop and I'm hoping that there are
    >> > wireless routers which can accomodate both wired and wireless PCs
    >> > because
    >> > I
    >> > don't want to have to get wireless adapters for the 2 PCs. Am I right?
    >> >
    >> > All PCs are running XP sp2.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    Sooner Al [MVP], Dec 21, 2005
    #5
  6. Hello,

    Most wireless broadband routers support 4 LAN Ports and 802.11 WLAN ,
    I also have 2 computer connected to a router on a hard line, a laptop
    connected by a wireless adapter and also I have a wireless PDA connected.
    you must have a wireless router to do this though and expect wireless speed
    to vary from wired connections. Home netowrks work fine with mixed
    connectoin types, as long as your only using one router. The router should
    have a setup for wireless, be sure to encrypt your wireless.
    =?Utf-8?B?bWUyMDA1?=, Dec 21, 2005
    #6
  7. Thanks to everyone for all the good input! I appreciate it.

    "me2005" wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > Most wireless broadband routers support 4 LAN Ports and 802.11 WLAN ,
    > I also have 2 computer connected to a router on a hard line, a laptop
    > connected by a wireless adapter and also I have a wireless PDA connected.
    > you must have a wireless router to do this though and expect wireless speed
    > to vary from wired connections. Home netowrks work fine with mixed
    > connectoin types, as long as your only using one router. The router should
    > have a setup for wireless, be sure to encrypt your wireless.
    =?Utf-8?B?cGhhc3Rp?=, Dec 25, 2005
    #7
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