Can USB Flash Drives speed up your system?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Colin B, Mar 10, 2007.

  1. Colin B

    Colin B Guest

    I have been looking at an 8GB USB Flash Drive, and when you click on its
    properties, it says "speed up your system by utilizing the available space
    on this drive". Has anyone experienced noticeable improvements in processing
    speeds by using such a flash drive? It says that while the device is being
    used for system speed, the reserved space will not be available for file
    storage. I have been told that it's almost as good as having an extra 4GB of
    RAM system memory, would this be correct? I thought it would be better to
    install extra RAM permanently if you want to speed up your system?

    This flash drive also says that, if used for storage purposes, it can
    compress data to store 3 times as much as data as otherwise would be the
    case. That is, an 8GB flash drive could store 24 GB of data. This sounds to
    be a pretty good feature?

    Colin
    Colin B, Mar 10, 2007
    #1
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  2. Colin B

    El Chippy Guest

    On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 17:50:14 +1300, Colin B wrote:

    > I have been looking at an 8GB USB Flash Drive, and when you click on its
    > properties, it says "speed up your system by utilizing the available space
    > on this drive". Has anyone experienced noticeable improvements in processing
    > speeds by using such a flash drive? It says that while the device is being
    > used for system speed, the reserved space will not be available for file
    > storage. I have been told that it's almost as good as having an extra 4GB of
    > RAM system memory, would this be correct?


    I've got a bridge i can let you have cheap ;)

    I thought it would be better
    > to install extra RAM permanently if you want to speed up your system?


    Yep, Ram is way faster than flash, and wont wear out after a few hundred
    thousand writes either.

    DDR2 Ram access time (read) ~ 50 ns (max)

    Flash access time (read) ~ 15us (max)

    So that makes a random byte read from DDR a measly 300 times faster...

    And writing... it just gets worse..

    However.. flash is a hell of a lot faster than paging a file on/off the
    hard drive. Typical seek access on a hard drive is over 500 times worse
    than flash so there is some merit in use flash to speed your
    system up. But nowhere as good as buying real ram.

    >
    > This flash drive also says that, if used for storage purposes, it can
    > compress data to store 3 times as much as data as otherwise would be the
    > case. That is, an 8GB flash drive could store 24 GB of data. This sounds to
    > be a pretty good feature?


    Sure, if you are storing plain text files you might get 8x as much data
    on. But good luck putting more than 8GB of compressed data (video,mp3,zip
    files etc) on.
    El Chippy, Mar 10, 2007
    #2
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  3. Colin B

    Colin B Guest

    Thanks El Chippy for your reply. The 8GB flash drive is only 30mm long and
    14mm wide, so it is hardly going to weigh you down! I guess the next step up
    from flash drives is to buy a mini hard drive that plugs directly into a USB
    port and that doesn't require cables or external power. Can anyone recommend
    a drive like this that has, say, 150GB storage capacity? I guess these are
    fairly expensive, compared to portable hard drives that have cables and that
    run on the power, but for a laptop, they seem to be a good idea.

    Colin


    "El Chippy" <> wrote in message
    news:45f242d3$...
    > On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 17:50:14 +1300, Colin B wrote:
    >
    >> I have been looking at an 8GB USB Flash Drive, and when you click on its
    >> properties, it says "speed up your system by utilizing the available
    >> space
    >> on this drive". Has anyone experienced noticeable improvements in
    >> processing
    >> speeds by using such a flash drive? It says that while the device is
    >> being
    >> used for system speed, the reserved space will not be available for file
    >> storage. I have been told that it's almost as good as having an extra 4GB
    >> of
    >> RAM system memory, would this be correct?

    >
    > I've got a bridge i can let you have cheap ;)
    >
    > I thought it would be better
    >> to install extra RAM permanently if you want to speed up your system?

    >
    > Yep, Ram is way faster than flash, and wont wear out after a few hundred
    > thousand writes either.
    >
    > DDR2 Ram access time (read) ~ 50 ns (max)
    >
    > Flash access time (read) ~ 15us (max)
    >
    > So that makes a random byte read from DDR a measly 300 times faster...
    >
    > And writing... it just gets worse..
    >
    > However.. flash is a hell of a lot faster than paging a file on/off the
    > hard drive. Typical seek access on a hard drive is over 500 times worse
    > than flash so there is some merit in use flash to speed your
    > system up. But nowhere as good as buying real ram.
    >
    >>
    >> This flash drive also says that, if used for storage purposes, it can
    >> compress data to store 3 times as much as data as otherwise would be the
    >> case. That is, an 8GB flash drive could store 24 GB of data. This sounds
    >> to
    >> be a pretty good feature?

    >
    > Sure, if you are storing plain text files you might get 8x as much data
    > on. But good luck putting more than 8GB of compressed data (video,mp3,zip
    > files etc) on.
    Colin B, Mar 10, 2007
    #3
  4. Colin B

    Mathew Good Guest

    On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 17:50:14 +1300, "Colin B" <Colin > wrote:

    >I have been looking at an 8GB USB Flash Drive, and when you click on its
    >properties, it says "speed up your system by utilizing the available space
    >on this drive". Has anyone experienced noticeable improvements in processing
    >speeds by using such a flash drive? It says that while the device is being
    >used for system speed, the reserved space will not be available for file
    >storage. I have been told that it's almost as good as having an extra 4GB of
    >RAM system memory, would this be correct? I thought it would be better to
    >install extra RAM permanently if you want to speed up your system?
    >
    >This flash drive also says that, if used for storage purposes, it can
    >compress data to store 3 times as much as data as otherwise would be the
    >case. That is, an 8GB flash drive could store 24 GB of data. This sounds to
    >be a pretty good feature?
    >
    >Colin
    >




    All BULL, the USB speed it far to slow to be any use..



    Flash drives have a Limited life also..
    Mathew Good, Mar 10, 2007
    #4
  5. Colin B

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 17:50:14 +1300, "Colin B" <Colin >
    exclaimed:

    >I have been looking at an 8GB USB Flash Drive, and when you click on its
    >properties, it says "speed up your system by utilizing the available space
    >on this drive". Has anyone experienced noticeable improvements in processing
    >speeds by using such a flash drive? It says that while the device is being
    >used for system speed, the reserved space will not be available for file
    >storage. I have been told that it's almost as good as having an extra 4GB of
    >RAM system memory, would this be correct? I thought it would be better to
    >install extra RAM permanently if you want to speed up your system?


    I'm assuming you're talking about "Windows ReadyBoost", one of the
    features of Vista.

    Despite what the uninformed are saying above, ReadyBoost (basically
    sticking an unused flash drive in) makes a considerable difference,
    especially to low-memory (1GB or less) machines.

    Here's some informed detail from Tom's Hardware:

    http://www.tomshardware.com/2007/01/31/windows-vista-superfetch-and-readyboostanalyzed/index.html

    (or http://tinyurl.com/2serr6)

    I've also had a play with this myself, and have noticed a very real
    performance difference.

    So, in short, yes it makes a noticable and considerable difference
    (although adding more system memory makes an even better difference).

    >This flash drive also says that, if used for storage purposes, it can
    >compress data to store 3 times as much as data as otherwise would be the
    >case. That is, an 8GB flash drive could store 24 GB of data. This sounds to
    >be a pretty good feature?


    It is, depending on the value of the data. If it high-value
    information you can't afford to lose, you shouldn't use the
    compression options. If you can take the (still very small) risk that
    they may become unrecoverable, then definately compression is best.

    Note that you will not gain much compressing compressed formats (such
    as JPG images or ZIPped files), but can get good results from EXEs,
    Word etc documents, etc.


    --

    Stupidest Comment of the Year Award:

    "People should take responsibility for their actions"

    - (Leftist) Matty F (7/1/2007), when explaining it was actually the quadbiker's
    fault that he was brutally murdered by Graeme Burton. According to Matty F,
    it was his fault that he was in the wrong place at the wrong time...



    Best Rant of the Year Award:

    "Interesting to see the Green bastard even at a supermarket shopping, instead
    of living off the land growing his own food. At least he's helped to keep the
    cogs and polution of industry going by shopping at supermarkets which sell
    products from large filthy factories [that] use stinking diesel trucks
    polluting the damn countryside just to get the goods to Nandor's favourite
    supermarket. Well done Nandor you two faced tax paid good for nothing bastard"

    - E. Scrooge (1/3/2007), a little unhappy about the Green's proposal to ban
    supermarket bags...
    Fred Dagg, Mar 10, 2007
    #5
  6. Colin B

    Murray Symon Guest

    On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 17:50:14 +1300, Colin B wrote:

    > I have been looking at an 8GB USB Flash Drive, and when you click on its
    > properties, it says "speed up your system by utilizing the available space
    > on this drive". Has anyone experienced noticeable improvements in processing
    > speeds by using such a flash drive? It says that while the device is being
    > used for system speed, the reserved space will not be available for file
    > storage. I have been told that it's almost as good as having an extra 4GB of
    > RAM system memory, would this be correct? I thought it would be better to
    > install extra RAM permanently if you want to speed up your system?
    >
    > This flash drive also says that, if used for storage purposes, it can
    > compress data to store 3 times as much as data as otherwise would be the
    > case. That is, an 8GB flash drive could store 24 GB of data. This sounds to
    > be a pretty good feature?
    >
    > Colin


    Are you using Windows Vista? It has such a feature (called ReadyBoost).

    Some USB Flash drives are faster than others, for this purpose.

    some links:
    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=186
    http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/index.php?p=90&page=2

    I have no experience of this, but was looking into it when my son got
    a new PC recently.

    Murray.
    Murray Symon, Mar 10, 2007
    #6
  7. Colin B

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 19:24:10 +1300, "Colin B" <Colin >
    exclaimed:

    >Thanks El Chippy for your reply. The 8GB flash drive is only 30mm long and
    >14mm wide, so it is hardly going to weigh you down! I guess the next step up
    >from flash drives is to buy a mini hard drive that plugs directly into a USB
    >port and that doesn't require cables or external power. Can anyone recommend
    >a drive like this that has, say, 150GB storage capacity? I guess these are
    >fairly expensive, compared to portable hard drives that have cables and that
    >run on the power, but for a laptop, they seem to be a good idea.


    The USB-powered models have 2.5" notebook hard drives in them, hence
    >100GB is pretty expensive.


    Also note that some laptops don't adhere to the USB power specs
    correctly, meaning that sometimes these drives simply wont work -
    especially if running in battery mode.


    --

    Stupidest Comment of the Year Award:

    "People should take responsibility for their actions"

    - (Leftist) Matty F (7/1/2007), when explaining it was actually the quadbiker's
    fault that he was brutally murdered by Graeme Burton. According to Matty F,
    it was his fault that he was in the wrong place at the wrong time...



    Best Rant of the Year Award:

    "Interesting to see the Green bastard even at a supermarket shopping, instead
    of living off the land growing his own food. At least he's helped to keep the
    cogs and polution of industry going by shopping at supermarkets which sell
    products from large filthy factories [that] use stinking diesel trucks
    polluting the damn countryside just to get the goods to Nandor's favourite
    supermarket. Well done Nandor you two faced tax paid good for nothing bastard"

    - E. Scrooge (1/3/2007), a little unhappy about the Green's proposal to ban
    supermarket bags...
    Fred Dagg, Mar 10, 2007
    #7
  8. Colin B

    Colin B Guest

    Thanks Fred for your comments. Yes, I am working with Vista on a laptop, so
    I found the Tomshardware article very interesting, particularly this
    extract:

    "Of course this requires as much main memory as possible, which is where the
    second feature engages: ReadyBoost allows expanding the main memory size by
    plugging in a USB 2.0 Flash drive. Although the data transfer performance of
    USB 2.0 devices cannot compete with modern hard drives, access times for
    Flash memory are literally nonexistent, making these devices a nice and
    particularly cheap choice."

    So it does seem that the main memory size can be effectively increased by
    the flash drive when using Vista and ReadyBoost. However, when I did a video
    editing rendering test, adding the flash memory didn't reduce the overall
    processing time, in fact, it was about 5% slower when the USB flash drive
    was attached. But perhaps the USB flash drive ReadyBoost function is more
    for improved file access than for improving grunty processing tasks?

    Your comments on compression were useful, thanks.

    Colin




    "Fred Dagg" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 17:50:14 +1300, "Colin B" <Colin >
    > exclaimed loudly:
    >
    >>I have been looking at an 8GB USB Flash Drive, and when you click on its
    >>properties, it says "speed up your system by utilizing the available space
    >>on this drive". Has anyone experienced noticeable improvements in
    >>processing
    >>speeds by using such a flash drive? It says that while the device is being
    >>used for system speed, the reserved space will not be available for file
    >>storage. I have been told that it's almost as good as having an extra 4GB
    >>of
    >>RAM system memory, would this be correct? I thought it would be better to
    >>install extra RAM permanently if you want to speed up your system?

    >
    > I'm assuming you're talking about "Windows ReadyBoost", one of the
    > features of Vista.
    >
    > Despite what the uninformed are saying above, ReadyBoost (basically
    > sticking an unused flash drive in) makes a considerable difference,
    > especially to low-memory (1GB or less) machines.
    >
    > Here's some informed detail from Tom's Hardware:
    >
    > http://www.tomshardware.com/2007/01/31/windows-vista-superfetch-and-readyboostanalyzed/index.html
    >
    > (or http://tinyurl.com/2serr6)
    >
    > I've also had a play with this myself, and have noticed a very real
    > performance difference.
    >
    > So, in short, yes it makes a noticable and considerable difference
    > (although adding more system memory makes an even better difference).
    >
    >>This flash drive also says that, if used for storage purposes, it can
    >>compress data to store 3 times as much as data as otherwise would be the
    >>case. That is, an 8GB flash drive could store 24 GB of data. This sounds
    >>to
    >>be a pretty good feature?

    >
    > It is, depending on the value of the data. If it high-value
    > information you can't afford to lose, you shouldn't use the
    > compression options. If you can take the (still very small) risk that
    > they may become unrecoverable, then definately compression is best.
    >
    > Note that you will not gain much compressing compressed formats (such
    > as JPG images or ZIPped files), but can get good results from EXEs,
    > Word etc documents, etc.
    Colin B, Mar 10, 2007
    #8
  9. Colin B

    Colin B Guest

    Thanks Murray, yes I am using Windows Vista on a laptop. The blogs you refer
    to are interesting, and the USB flash drive I have tested does meet all the
    performance requirements that are needed for a flash drive to work properly
    under Vista.

    Colin


    "Murray Symon" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 17:50:14 +1300, Colin B wrote:
    >
    >> I have been looking at an 8GB USB Flash Drive, and when you click on its
    >> properties, it says "speed up your system by utilizing the available
    >> space
    >> on this drive". Has anyone experienced noticeable improvements in
    >> processing
    >> speeds by using such a flash drive? It says that while the device is
    >> being
    >> used for system speed, the reserved space will not be available for file
    >> storage. I have been told that it's almost as good as having an extra 4GB
    >> of
    >> RAM system memory, would this be correct? I thought it would be better to
    >> install extra RAM permanently if you want to speed up your system?
    >>
    >> This flash drive also says that, if used for storage purposes, it can
    >> compress data to store 3 times as much as data as otherwise would be the
    >> case. That is, an 8GB flash drive could store 24 GB of data. This sounds
    >> to
    >> be a pretty good feature?
    >>
    >> Colin

    >
    > Are you using Windows Vista? It has such a feature (called ReadyBoost).
    >
    > Some USB Flash drives are faster than others, for this purpose.
    >
    > some links:
    > http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=186
    > http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/index.php?p=90&page=2
    >
    > I have no experience of this, but was looking into it when my son got
    > a new PC recently.
    >
    > Murray.
    Colin B, Mar 10, 2007
    #9
  10. Colin B

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 21:01:41 +1300, "Colin B" <Colin >
    exclaimed:

    >Thanks Fred for your comments. Yes, I am working with Vista on a laptop, so
    >I found the Tomshardware article very interesting, particularly this
    >extract:
    >
    >"Of course this requires as much main memory as possible, which is where the
    >second feature engages: ReadyBoost allows expanding the main memory size by
    >plugging in a USB 2.0 Flash drive. Although the data transfer performance of
    >USB 2.0 devices cannot compete with modern hard drives, access times for
    >Flash memory are literally nonexistent, making these devices a nice and
    >particularly cheap choice."
    >
    >So it does seem that the main memory size can be effectively increased by
    >the flash drive when using Vista and ReadyBoost. However, when I did a video
    >editing rendering test, adding the flash memory didn't reduce the overall
    >processing time, in fact, it was about 5% slower when the USB flash drive
    >was attached. But perhaps the USB flash drive ReadyBoost function is more
    >for improved file access than for improving grunty processing tasks?


    Yup, it doesn't actually use it for processing (such as video editing
    etc), but uses it to cache applications.

    Odd that it would actually be slower, though! I guess it's within a
    margin that you may find exists if you do the same thing several times
    with the same setup.


    --

    Stupidest Comment of the Year Award:

    "People should take responsibility for their actions"

    - (Leftist) Matty F (7/1/2007), when explaining it was actually the quadbiker's
    fault that he was brutally murdered by Graeme Burton. According to Matty F,
    it was his fault that he was in the wrong place at the wrong time...



    Best Rant of the Year Award:

    "Interesting to see the Green bastard even at a supermarket shopping, instead
    of living off the land growing his own food. At least he's helped to keep the
    cogs and polution of industry going by shopping at supermarkets which sell
    products from large filthy factories [that] use stinking diesel trucks
    polluting the damn countryside just to get the goods to Nandor's favourite
    supermarket. Well done Nandor you two faced tax paid good for nothing bastard"

    - E. Scrooge (1/3/2007), a little unhappy about the Green's proposal to ban
    supermarket bags...
    Fred Dagg, Mar 10, 2007
    #10
  11. Colin B

    Richard Guest

    Fred Dagg wrote:

    > Yup, it doesn't actually use it for processing (such as video editing
    > etc), but uses it to cache applications.
    >
    > Odd that it would actually be slower, though! I guess it's within a
    > margin that you may find exists if you do the same thing several times
    > with the same setup.


    I find that rendering etc is slower on the laptop the second time
    usually, because of the thermal throttling that happens since they dont
    put decent cooling on the things.
    Richard, Mar 10, 2007
    #11
  12. Colin B

    Murray Symon Guest

    On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 22:00:41 +1300, Fred Dagg wrote:

    > On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 21:01:41 +1300, "Colin B" <Colin >
    > exclaimed:
    >
    >>Thanks Fred for your comments. Yes, I am working with Vista on a laptop, so
    >>I found the Tomshardware article very interesting, particularly this
    >>extract:
    >>
    >>"Of course this requires as much main memory as possible, which is where the
    >>second feature engages: ReadyBoost allows expanding the main memory size by
    >>plugging in a USB 2.0 Flash drive. Although the data transfer performance of
    >>USB 2.0 devices cannot compete with modern hard drives, access times for
    >>Flash memory are literally nonexistent, making these devices a nice and
    >>particularly cheap choice."
    >>
    >>So it does seem that the main memory size can be effectively increased by
    >>the flash drive when using Vista and ReadyBoost. However, when I did a video
    >>editing rendering test, adding the flash memory didn't reduce the overall
    >>processing time, in fact, it was about 5% slower when the USB flash drive
    >>was attached. But perhaps the USB flash drive ReadyBoost function is more
    >>for improved file access than for improving grunty processing tasks?

    >
    > Yup, it doesn't actually use it for processing (such as video editing
    > etc), but uses it to cache applications.
    >
    > Odd that it would actually be slower, though! I guess it's within a
    > margin that you may find exists if you do the same thing several times
    > with the same setup.


    When running timing tests you need to run each test at least 3 times
    consecutively without changing any of the (other) variables. There
    are many subtle factors that can skew the results of a single test run.

    Murray.
    Murray Symon, Mar 11, 2007
    #12
  13. On Mar 10, 9:25 pm, "Colin B" <Colin > wrote:
    > Thanks Murray, yes I am using Windows Vista on a laptop. The blogs you refer
    > to are interesting, and the USB flash drive I have tested does meet all the
    > performance requirements that are needed for a flash drive to work properly
    > under Vista.


    In Vista, flash can be used as a disk cache to boost system
    performance. By caching frequently used data on a device with fast
    random access, system performance improves. Although this benefits
    machines under memory pressure, RAM is not actually expanding RAM.

    This won't really wear out USB FDs like others on this thread have
    been stating. Microsoft is aware of the lifecycle issues with flash
    drives and are smart about how and when writes happen to the device.
    Research shows that devices will get at least 10+ years life out of
    flash devices.

    Of course USB is "slow" and hard drives are "fast" But hard drives
    are great for large sequential I/O. For those situations, ReadyBoost
    gets out of the way. ReadyBoost concentrates on improving the
    performance of small, random I/Os, like paging to and from disk.

    How much of a speed increase are you talking about?
    Well, it depends. On average, a RANDOM 4K read from flash is about 10x
    faster than from HDD. Now, how does that translate to end-user
    performance? Under memory pressure and heavy disk activity, the system
    is much more responsive; on a 4GB machine with few applications
    running, the ReadyBoost effect is much less noticable.

    Cheers
    Nathan
    Nathan Mercer, Mar 11, 2007
    #13
  14. On Sun, 11 Mar 2007 01:44:40 -0800, Nathan Mercer wrote:

    >> Thanks Murray, yes I am using Windows Vista on a laptop. The blogs you
    >> refer to are interesting, and the USB flash drive I have tested does
    >> meet all the performance requirements that are needed for a flash drive
    >> to work properly under Vista.

    >
    > In Vista, flash can be used as a disk cache to boost system performance.
    > By caching frequently used data on a device with fast random access,
    > system performance improves. Although this benefits machines under
    > memory pressure, RAM is not actually expanding RAM.
    >
    > This won't really wear out USB FDs like others on this thread have been
    > stating. Microsoft is aware of the lifecycle issues with flash drives
    > and are smart about how and when writes happen to the device. Research
    > shows that devices will get at least 10+ years life out of flash
    > devices.
    >
    > Of course USB is "slow" and hard drives are "fast" But hard drives are
    > great for large sequential I/O. For those situations, ReadyBoost gets
    > out of the way. ReadyBoost concentrates on improving the performance of
    > small, random I/Os, like paging to and from disk.
    >
    > How much of a speed increase are you talking about? Well, it depends. On
    > average, a RANDOM 4K read from flash is about 10x faster than from HDD.
    > Now, how does that translate to end-user performance? Under memory
    > pressure and heavy disk activity, the system is much more responsive; on
    > a 4GB machine with few applications running, the ReadyBoost effect is
    > much less noticable.


    Translated:

    Vista is a bloated memory hog and in order to compensate for insufficient
    RAM M$ has come up with a kludge that uses a USB memory stick. Yes - this
    stick will wear out eventually, but M$ has employed another kludge to stop
    that from happening so soon.


    --
    Dianthus Mimulus

    Microsoft's business practises exposed in court:
    http://www.maxframe.com/DR/Info/fullstory/dsprgmnt.html#_Toc447960918
    Dianthus Mimulus, Mar 11, 2007
    #14
  15. On Mar 12, 6:46 am, Dianthus Mimulus <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 11 Mar 2007 01:44:40 -0800, Nathan Mercer wrote:
    > >> Thanks Murray, yes I am using Windows Vista on a laptop. The blogs you
    > >> refer to are interesting, and the USB flash drive I have tested does
    > >> meet all the performance requirements that are needed for a flash drive
    > >> to work properly under Vista.

    >
    > > In Vista, flash can be used as a disk cache to boost system performance.
    > > By caching frequently used data on a device with fast random access,
    > > system performance improves. Although this benefits machines under
    > > memory pressure, RAM is not actually expanding RAM.

    >
    > > This won't really wear out USB FDs like others on this thread have been
    > > stating. Microsoft is aware of the lifecycle issues with flash drives
    > > and are smart about how and when writes happen to the device. Research
    > > shows that devices will get at least 10+ years life out of flash
    > > devices.

    >
    > > Of course USB is "slow" and hard drives are "fast" But hard drives are
    > > great for large sequential I/O. For those situations, ReadyBoost gets
    > > out of the way. ReadyBoost concentrates on improving the performance of
    > > small, random I/Os, like paging to and from disk.

    >
    > > How much of a speed increase are you talking about? Well, it depends. On
    > > average, a RANDOM 4K read from flash is about 10x faster than from HDD.
    > > Now, how does that translate to end-user performance? Under memory
    > > pressure and heavy disk activity, the system is much more responsive; on
    > > a 4GB machine with few applications running, the ReadyBoost effect is
    > > much less noticable.

    >
    > Translated:
    >
    > Vista is a bloated memory hog and in order to compensate for insufficient
    > RAM M$ has come up with a kludge that uses a USB memory stick. Yes - this
    > stick will wear out eventually, but M$ has employed another kludge to stop
    > that from happening so soon.


    Yes we all know that you are suffering from NIH Syndrome and are
    jealous
    Nathan Mercer, Mar 11, 2007
    #15
  16. Colin B

    bAZZ Guest


    >
    > Translated:
    >
    > Vista is a bloated memory hog and in order to compensate for insufficient
    > RAM M$ has come up with a kludge that uses a USB memory stick. Yes - this
    > stick will wear out eventually, but M$ has employed another kludge to stop
    > that from happening so soon.
    >
    >
    >


    Translated:

    You are a fucking Idiot at times. You have neither used or ever will the
    OS and the hardware involved so why pipe in with your anti-microsoft
    blather. I was watching this thread as was interested in the use of new
    tech and wondering if principles would/could be used in other OS etc.
    Now that would be a pertinent post on how it related to *your* OS of
    choice, not the usual OS bashing.

    Where were you last week when I asked here for comments on Peanut linux
    or week before about Damn Small Linux screen resolutions.

    For all your posturing and advocacy you really do need to concentrate on
    what *you know* not what you *think* ( or imagine).

    I sometimes wonder why Nathan or Brett even bother posting here ( to
    help people with their questions and offer advice) at times when they
    seem to be on a hiding to nothing. You could 100% predict that you and
    your mob will start shrilling and screeching about M$$$$$$ and it's
    evils. They are the bigger man for it.

    **** off.

    /rant over /
    --
    --
    --
    bAZZ..>>
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If you try me, you'll buy me
    If you buy me, you'll use me
    If you use me, you'll abuse me
    If you abuse me, I'll own you.
    bAZZ, Mar 11, 2007
    #16
  17. Colin B

    ~misfit~ Guest

    bAZZ wrote:
    > > Translated:
    > >
    > > Vista is a bloated memory hog and in order to compensate for
    > > insufficient RAM M$ has come up with a kludge that uses a USB
    > > memory stick. Yes - this stick will wear out eventually, but M$ has
    > > employed another kludge to stop that from happening so soon.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Translated:
    >
    > You are a fucking Idiot at times. You have neither used or ever will
    > the OS and the hardware involved so why pipe in with your
    > anti-microsoft blather. I was watching this thread as was interested
    > in the use of new tech and wondering if principles would/could be
    > used in other OS etc. Now that would be a pertinent post on how it
    > related to *your* OS of choice, not the usual OS bashing.
    >
    > Where were you last week when I asked here for comments on Peanut
    > linux or week before about Damn Small Linux screen resolutions.
    >
    > For all your posturing and advocacy you really do need to concentrate
    > on what *you know* not what you *think* ( or imagine).
    >
    > I sometimes wonder why Nathan or Brett even bother posting here ( to
    > help people with their questions and offer advice) at times when they
    > seem to be on a hiding to nothing. You could 100% predict that you and
    > your mob will start shrilling and screeching about M$$$$$$ and it's
    > evils. They are the bigger man for it.
    >
    > **** off.
    >
    > /rant over /


    Woot!!!

    Well said.

    Although I don't know why you don't just killfile the retards. It makes the
    group so much more pleasant and, as you said, they don't contribute.
    --
    Shaun.
    ~misfit~, Mar 12, 2007
    #17
  18. Colin B

    bAZZ Guest

    In article <45f4b2ab$>,
    says...
    > bAZZ wrote:
    > > > Translated:
    > > >
    > > > Vista is a bloated memory hog and in order to compensate for
    > > > insufficient RAM M$ has come up with a kludge that uses a USB
    > > > memory stick. Yes - this stick will wear out eventually, but M$ has
    > > > employed another kludge to stop that from happening so soon.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > Translated:
    > >
    > > You are a fucking Idiot at times. You have neither used or ever will
    > > the OS and the hardware involved so why pipe in with your
    > > anti-microsoft blather. I was watching this thread as was interested
    > > in the use of new tech and wondering if principles would/could be
    > > used in other OS etc. Now that would be a pertinent post on how it
    > > related to *your* OS of choice, not the usual OS bashing.
    > >
    > > Where were you last week when I asked here for comments on Peanut
    > > linux or week before about Damn Small Linux screen resolutions.
    > >
    > > For all your posturing and advocacy you really do need to concentrate
    > > on what *you know* not what you *think* ( or imagine).
    > >
    > > I sometimes wonder why Nathan or Brett even bother posting here ( to
    > > help people with their questions and offer advice) at times when they
    > > seem to be on a hiding to nothing. You could 100% predict that you and
    > > your mob will start shrilling and screeching about M$$$$$$ and it's
    > > evils. They are the bigger man for it.
    > >
    > > **** off.
    > >
    > > /rant over /

    >
    > Woot!!!
    >
    > Well said.
    >
    > Although I don't know why you don't just killfile the retards. It makes the
    > group so much more pleasant and, as you said, they don't contribute.
    >


    Well believe it or not I don't use a kill file, or bozo bin as Gravity
    calls it. I do tho in case of spammers and such cos I don't want to read
    their crap. As for posters I can choose what and if I want to read
    someones post and often avoid the odd couple posters. It's easy to hit
    space bar another time to pass their wafflings. Tend to read most of it
    here an gives ya good insight into ppl's heads and is a funny little
    study of human nature LOL. Most times ppl reply to them anyway making
    killfile redundant in anycase :)

    See Ya
    --
    --
    --
    bAZZ..>>
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If you try me, you'll buy me
    If you buy me, you'll use me
    If you use me, you'll abuse me
    If you abuse me, I'll own you.
    bAZZ, Mar 12, 2007
    #18
  19. On Mon, 12 Mar 2007 10:08:47 +1300, bAZZ wrote:

    >> Vista is a bloated memory hog and in order to compensate for insufficient
    >> RAM M$ has come up with a kludge that uses a USB memory stick. Yes - this
    >> stick will wear out eventually, but M$ has employed another kludge to stop
    >> that from happening so soon.

    >
    > Translated:
    >
    > You are a fucking Idiot at times. You have neither used or ever will the
    > OS and the hardware involved so why pipe in with your anti-microsoft
    > blather. I was watching this thread as was interested in the use of new
    > tech and wondering if principles would/could be used in other OS etc.
    > Now that would be a pertinent post on how it related to *your* OS of
    > choice, not the usual OS bashing.


    Are you suggesting that the idea of using a USB memory stick to compensate
    for insufficient RAM installed into a PC (instead of implementing a
    proper solution by installing more RAM) is a good idea that should be
    emulated on all computers with a basic lack of installed RAM?

    I hope that ridiculous kludge is NEVER tried on ANY computer using a
    non-M$ OS!


    --
    Dianthus Mimulus

    Microsoft's business practises exposed in court:
    http://www.maxframe.com/DR/Info/fullstory/dsprgmnt.html#_Toc447960918
    Dianthus Mimulus, Mar 12, 2007
    #19
  20. Colin B

    bAZZ Guest

    In article <>, lid says...
    > On Mon, 12 Mar 2007 10:08:47 +1300, bAZZ wrote:
    >
    > >> Vista is a bloated memory hog and in order to compensate for insufficient
    > >> RAM M$ has come up with a kludge that uses a USB memory stick. Yes - this
    > >> stick will wear out eventually, but M$ has employed another kludge to stop
    > >> that from happening so soon.

    > >
    > > Translated:
    > >
    > > You are a fucking Idiot at times. You have neither used or ever will the
    > > OS and the hardware involved so why pipe in with your anti-microsoft
    > > blather. I was watching this thread as was interested in the use of new
    > > tech and wondering if principles would/could be used in other OS etc.
    > > Now that would be a pertinent post on how it related to *your* OS of
    > > choice, not the usual OS bashing.

    >
    > Are you suggesting that the idea of using a USB memory stick to compensate
    > for insufficient RAM installed into a PC (instead of implementing a
    > proper solution by installing more RAM) is a good idea that should be
    > emulated on all computers with a basic lack of installed RAM?
    >
    > I hope that ridiculous kludge is NEVER tried on ANY computer using a
    > non-M$ OS!
    >
    >
    >


    Oh FFS. You know I have no killfile now and are trying to injure me by
    having me bash my head against a brick wall, aren't you?

    No, I'm not suggesting that at all (although it seems like a.....)oh
    **** this I am NOT getting into a debate with you. It's just not worth
    it. You never read my comments really did you. It was about YOU and your
    bullshit in this group. And the more I write the more you are sucking me
    into another of those endless loops of going nowhere. Not this time big
    boy.

    Later
    --
    --
    --
    bAZZ..>>
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If you try me, you'll buy me
    If you buy me, you'll use me
    If you use me, you'll abuse me
    If you abuse me, I'll own you.
    bAZZ, Mar 12, 2007
    #20
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