Can this happen?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Scribner, Mar 2, 2009.

  1. Scribner

    Scribner Guest

    I've got a less than 2 year old, 500 watt CooMax power supply in my
    computer. Never had any trouble with it. A few days ago, I bought an
    ION VCR2PC gizmo. It is supposed to convert VHS tapes into DVDs. It
    looks like a VCR. It plugs into my computer via USB. So, Friday
    night, I'm trying the thing out. It is playing a movie into my
    computer when BANG! my power supply blows. Dead. Ok. Do-do happens.
    But this is my work computer so I run to the store on Saturday and get
    a Thermaltake 600 watt power supply. On Sunday, I'm trying to copy
    the same movie when this new power supply shuts down. Fortunately, it
    reset. So I unplugged the ION gizmo and put it back in the box. Today
    is Monday and so far no power supply problems. Am I jumping the gun,
    or could a USB device blow a computer power supply? Thanks.
     
    Scribner, Mar 2, 2009
    #1
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  2. Scribner

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2009-03-02, Scribner <> wrote:
    > I've got a less than 2 year old, 500 watt CooMax power supply in my
    > computer. Never had any trouble with it. A few days ago, I bought an
    > ION VCR2PC gizmo. It is supposed to convert VHS tapes into DVDs. It
    > looks like a VCR. It plugs into my computer via USB. So, Friday
    > night, I'm trying the thing out. It is playing a movie into my
    > computer when BANG! my power supply blows. Dead. Ok. Do-do happens.
    > But this is my work computer so I run to the store on Saturday and get
    > a Thermaltake 600 watt power supply. On Sunday, I'm trying to copy
    > the same movie when this new power supply shuts down. Fortunately, it
    > reset. So I unplugged the ION gizmo and put it back in the box. Today
    > is Monday and so far no power supply problems. Am I jumping the gun,
    > or could a USB device blow a computer power supply? Thanks.


    A VCR seems to be rather a large appliance to be relying on the power from
    a USB socket! Does it have no independent power supply of its own?

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Mar 2, 2009
    #2
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  3. Scribner

    Mike Easter Guest

    Scribner wrote:
    > I've got a less than 2 year old, 500 watt CooMax power supply in my
    > computer. Never had any trouble with it. A few days ago, I bought an
    > ION VCR2PC gizmo. It is supposed to convert VHS tapes into DVDs. It
    > looks like a VCR. It plugs into my computer via USB. So, Friday
    > night, I'm trying the thing out. It is playing a movie into my
    > computer when BANG! my power supply blows. Dead. Ok. Do-do happens.
    > But this is my work computer so I run to the store on Saturday and get
    > a Thermaltake 600 watt power supply. On Sunday, I'm trying to copy
    > the same movie when this new power supply shuts down. Fortunately, it
    > reset. So I unplugged the ION gizmo and put it back in the box. Today
    > is Monday and so far no power supply problems. Am I jumping the gun,
    > or could a USB device blow a computer power supply? Thanks.


    If something is wrong with it, it could do a lot of things.

    According to the website, it is supposed to just be an ordinary USB2, not
    even a USB+power which can have much higher demands.

    The USB2 is supposed to be limited to 5V and only 100mA which is really
    nothing.

    However, when you are using the gizmo, you might be 'turning on' the
    demands of the rest of your system and if things were marginal, the
    'system' load would increase -- but I can't imagine a system in which you
    are exceeding the 500 watt CoolMax which (I think) is rated for 22A on the
    5V rail.


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Mar 2, 2009
    #3
  4. Scribner

    ian field Guest

    "Bill" <> wrote in message
    news:MPG.2415d3cae835cd13989684@localhost...
    > In article <>,
    > says...
    >>
    >> I've got a less than 2 year old, 500 watt CooMax power supply in my
    >> computer. Never had any trouble with it. A few days ago, I bought an
    >> ION VCR2PC gizmo. It is supposed to convert VHS tapes into DVDs. It
    >> looks like a VCR. It plugs into my computer via USB. So, Friday
    >> night, I'm trying the thing out. It is playing a movie into my
    >> computer when BANG! my power supply blows. Dead. Ok. Do-do happens.
    >> But this is my work computer so I run to the store on Saturday and get
    >> a Thermaltake 600 watt power supply. On Sunday, I'm trying to copy
    >> the same movie when this new power supply shuts down. Fortunately, it
    >> reset. So I unplugged the ION gizmo and put it back in the box. Today
    >> is Monday and so far no power supply problems. Am I jumping the gun,
    >> or could a USB device blow a computer power supply? Thanks.

    >
    > As my old sky pilot used to tell me, "Feces Occurs".
    >
    > You might want to do some more investigating though.
    >
    > Bill
    >


    Just a thought - try a transient suppressor plugstrip, it may be that the
    new appliance is putting spikes on the mains (if it is take it back).

    Most good DIY stores sell 4 or 6 way protected socket strips, some sell
    individual - 1 socket protectors, you could give the PC and the new
    appliance one each for a bit of overkill.

    For a PC PSU to go bang is quite unusual and for a replacement to trip
    strongly suggests spiky mains.
     
    ian field, Mar 2, 2009
    #4
  5. Scribner

    Scribner Guest

    On Mon, 2 Mar 2009 19:57:41 -0000, "ian field"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Bill" <> wrote in message
    >news:MPG.2415d3cae835cd13989684@localhost...
    >> In article <>,
    >> says...
    >>>
    >>> I've got a less than 2 year old, 500 watt CooMax power supply in my
    >>> computer. Never had any trouble with it. A few days ago, I bought an
    >>> ION VCR2PC gizmo. It is supposed to convert VHS tapes into DVDs. It
    >>> looks like a VCR. It plugs into my computer via USB. So, Friday
    >>> night, I'm trying the thing out. It is playing a movie into my
    >>> computer when BANG! my power supply blows. Dead. Ok. Do-do happens.
    >>> But this is my work computer so I run to the store on Saturday and get
    >>> a Thermaltake 600 watt power supply. On Sunday, I'm trying to copy
    >>> the same movie when this new power supply shuts down. Fortunately, it
    >>> reset. So I unplugged the ION gizmo and put it back in the box. Today
    >>> is Monday and so far no power supply problems. Am I jumping the gun,
    >>> or could a USB device blow a computer power supply? Thanks.

    >>
    >> As my old sky pilot used to tell me, "Feces Occurs".
    >>
    >> You might want to do some more investigating though.
    >>
    >> Bill
    >>

    >
    >Just a thought - try a transient suppressor plugstrip, it may be that the
    >new appliance is putting spikes on the mains (if it is take it back).
    >
    >Most good DIY stores sell 4 or 6 way protected socket strips, some sell
    >individual - 1 socket protectors, you could give the PC and the new
    >appliance one each for a bit of overkill.
    >
    >For a PC PSU to go bang is quite unusual and for a replacement to trip
    >strongly suggests spiky mains.
    >

    Well, the bang happened on Friday night. The Friday prior to this,
    about 1/2 mile square in my area (including me) lost power for about
    30 minutes. Then the same thing happened the following Monday. The
    explanation was that a power cable "blew." But I have the computer
    plugged into a very expensive ($100+) surge suppressor power strip.
    If this had been a spike on the main, then why wouldn't my plasma TV,
    and my home theatre system have gone down. They are all plugged into
    the same strip. They didn't even flicker. The new gizmo is not
    plugged into any surge suppressor.
     
    Scribner, Mar 2, 2009
    #5
  6. Scribner

    Scribner Guest

    On Mon, 2 Mar 2009 10:58:43 -0800, "Mike Easter" <>
    wrote:

    >Scribner wrote:
    >> I've got a less than 2 year old, 500 watt CooMax power supply in my
    >> computer. Never had any trouble with it. A few days ago, I bought an
    >> ION VCR2PC gizmo. It is supposed to convert VHS tapes into DVDs. It
    >> looks like a VCR. It plugs into my computer via USB. So, Friday
    >> night, I'm trying the thing out. It is playing a movie into my
    >> computer when BANG! my power supply blows. Dead. Ok. Do-do happens.
    >> But this is my work computer so I run to the store on Saturday and get
    >> a Thermaltake 600 watt power supply. On Sunday, I'm trying to copy
    >> the same movie when this new power supply shuts down. Fortunately, it
    >> reset. So I unplugged the ION gizmo and put it back in the box. Today
    >> is Monday and so far no power supply problems. Am I jumping the gun,
    >> or could a USB device blow a computer power supply? Thanks.

    >
    >If something is wrong with it, it could do a lot of things.
    >
    >According to the website, it is supposed to just be an ordinary USB2, not
    >even a USB+power which can have much higher demands.
    >
    >The USB2 is supposed to be limited to 5V and only 100mA which is really
    >nothing.
    >
    >However, when you are using the gizmo, you might be 'turning on' the
    >demands of the rest of your system and if things were marginal, the
    >'system' load would increase -- but I can't imagine a system in which you
    >are exceeding the 500 watt CoolMax which (I think) is rated for 22A on the
    >5V rail.



    According to my specs., it is rated to 30 Amps. And the CoolMax is
    supposed to haveOver/Under Voltage Protection, Over Current
    Protection, Short Circuit Protection and Over Load Protection. I
    would write it off as some dust causing a short but not when the brand
    new power supply shut down.
     
    Scribner, Mar 2, 2009
    #6
  7. Scribner wrote:

    > I've got a less than 2 year old, 500 watt CooMax power supply in my
    > computer. Never had any trouble with it. A few days ago, I bought an
    > ION VCR2PC gizmo. It is supposed to convert VHS tapes into DVDs. It
    > looks like a VCR. It plugs into my computer via USB. So, Friday


    I don't think the 100 mA supplied through USB can drive a vhs tape and the
    head drum. Even if it "looks like a vcr". So, the gizmo will be
    connected/wired to a real VCR, to fetch the signal. Maybe svhs (small round
    plugs) or scart, or just cinch video/audio?

    > night, I'm trying the thing out. It is playing a movie into my
    > computer when BANG! my power supply blows. Dead. Ok. Do-do happens.
    > But this is my work computer so I run to the store on Saturday and get
    > a Thermaltake 600 watt power supply. On Sunday, I'm trying to copy
    > the same movie when this new power supply shuts down. Fortunately, it
    > reset. So I unplugged the ION gizmo and put it back in the box. Today
    > is Monday and so far no power supply problems. Am I jumping the gun,
    > or could a USB device blow a computer power supply? Thanks.


    I imagine the device interconnects to a vcr/player, which may be on another
    mains circuit, together with your dishwasher or microwave. I also imagine a
    high ground resistance and .... kabooom ....
     
    wisdomkiller & pain, Mar 2, 2009
    #7
  8. Scribner

    Scribner Guest

    On Tue, 3 Mar 2009 09:41:53 -0000, "Tony" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"wisdomkiller & pain" <> wrote in
    >message news:...
    >> Scribner wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've got a less than 2 year old, 500 watt CooMax power supply in my
    >>> computer. Never had any trouble with it. A few days ago, I bought an
    >>> ION VCR2PC gizmo. It is supposed to convert VHS tapes into DVDs. It
    >>> looks like a VCR. It plugs into my computer via USB. So, Friday

    >>
    >> I don't think the 100 mA supplied through USB can drive a vhs tape and the
    >> head drum. Even if it "looks like a vcr". So, the gizmo will be
    >> connected/wired to a real VCR, to fetch the signal. Maybe svhs (small
    >> round
    >> plugs) or scart, or just cinch video/audio?
    >>
    >>> night, I'm trying the thing out. It is playing a movie into my
    >>> computer when BANG! my power supply blows. Dead. Ok. Do-do happens.
    >>> But this is my work computer so I run to the store on Saturday and get
    >>> a Thermaltake 600 watt power supply. On Sunday, I'm trying to copy
    >>> the same movie when this new power supply shuts down. Fortunately, it
    >>> reset. So I unplugged the ION gizmo and put it back in the box. Today
    >>> is Monday and so far no power supply problems. Am I jumping the gun,
    >>> or could a USB device blow a computer power supply? Thanks.

    >>
    >> I imagine the device interconnects to a vcr/player, which may be on
    >> another
    >> mains circuit, together with your dishwasher or microwave. I also imagine
    >> a
    >> high ground resistance and .... kabooom ....
    >>

    >
    >This is the device the OP has, it is not powered via the USB.
    >http://gizmodo.com/382669/
    >
    >It plugs into a power socket, it performs on-board digital
    >conversion to several formats -mpeg, H.264, etc etc
    >USB is just used to capture the converted footage from the
    >Ion vhs converter.
    >It is also a VCR in it's own right with ability to connect to a
    >TV and playback VHS tapes.
    >The OP should do that, if it zaps his TV then the Ion is evil,
    >if not then it is other issues with his power supply, just a
    >coincidence?
    >



    UPDATE: With the new power supply installed, and my problem
    presumably solved, I was using my computer for work with my usual
    dozen or so windows opened. During a boring lull, I started to play a
    video game. After about 10 minutes of play, the computer shut off. I
    had to turn the master switch off and then back on. Everything was
    fine after that, until after work. I decided to run a CPU stress
    test. During the test, the computer shut off again. I checked my fan
    speeds in the BIOS when I re-booted and my CPU fan wasn't registering.
    So I opened up the case and noticed that my Thermaltake fan was doing
    about 1 rev a second. I shut everything down, removed the fan, blew
    it out, and sprayed it with silicone. Now I'm running Speedfan to
    monitor my core temps (52 C) and my CPU fan speed (1493). I am NOT
    going to do any stress testing until after work.
     
    Scribner, Mar 4, 2009
    #8
  9. In message <>, Scribner wrote:

    >
    > UPDATE: With the new power supply installed, and my problem
    > presumably solved, I was using my computer for work with my usual
    > dozen or so windows opened. During a boring lull, I started to play a
    > video game. After about 10 minutes of play, the computer shut off. I
    > had to turn the master switch off and then back on. Everything was
    > fine after that, until after work. I decided to run a CPU stress
    > test. During the test, the computer shut off again. I checked my fan
    > speeds in the BIOS when I re-booted and my CPU fan wasn't registering.
    > So I opened up the case and noticed that my Thermaltake fan was doing
    > about 1 rev a second. I shut everything down, removed the fan, blew
    > it out, and sprayed it with silicone. Now I'm running Speedfan to
    > monitor my core temps (52 C) and my CPU fan speed (1493). I am NOT
    > going to do any stress testing until after work.


    Fans are cheaper than CPU's...just replace the fan before you regret it.

    HTH

    --
    "I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of freedom of the people
    by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power than by violent and
    sudden usurpations.... The means of defense against foreign danger historically
    have become the instruments of tyranny at home."
    -James Madison
     
    §ñühw¤£f, Mar 4, 2009
    #9
  10. Scribner

    Scribner Guest

    On Wed, 04 Mar 2009 14:36:58 -0700, §ñühw¤£f <>
    wrote:

    >In message <>, Scribner wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> UPDATE: With the new power supply installed, and my problem
    >> presumably solved, I was using my computer for work with my usual
    >> dozen or so windows opened. During a boring lull, I started to play a
    >> video game. After about 10 minutes of play, the computer shut off. I
    >> had to turn the master switch off and then back on. Everything was
    >> fine after that, until after work. I decided to run a CPU stress
    >> test. During the test, the computer shut off again. I checked my fan
    >> speeds in the BIOS when I re-booted and my CPU fan wasn't registering.
    >> So I opened up the case and noticed that my Thermaltake fan was doing
    >> about 1 rev a second. I shut everything down, removed the fan, blew
    >> it out, and sprayed it with silicone. Now I'm running Speedfan to
    >> monitor my core temps (52 C) and my CPU fan speed (1493). I am NOT
    >> going to do any stress testing until after work.

    >
    >Fans are cheaper than CPU's...just replace the fan before you regret it.
    >
    >HTH

    On my way to the store to get a Thermaltake Big Typhoon VX.
     
    Scribner, Mar 5, 2009
    #10
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