Can one measure colour temperature with the Nikon D3?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Dave, Sep 6, 2008.

  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Is it possible to get a numerical value for the colour temperature on a
    D3? I know it's possible to photograph a gray card and use that to get
    the colour temperature stored in d-0, but can one see what that value is
    - i.e. how many Kelvin?

    If it is, please share the secret.

    dave
     
    Dave, Sep 6, 2008
    #1
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  2. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Rita Berkowitz wrote:
    > Dave wrote:
    >
    >> Is it possible to get a numerical value for the colour temperature on
    >> a D3? I know it's possible to photograph a gray card and use that to
    >> get the colour temperature stored in d-0, but can one see what that
    >> value is - i.e. how many Kelvin?
    >>
    >> If it is, please share the secret.

    >
    > Don't think so. I spent about five minutes looking for the same thing when
    > I got my D3. I guess it's really not important?
    >
    >
    >
    > Rita


    Strange we both wanted to find it though. I can't believe it would be
    anything but trivual to implement when a new firmware release is made. I
    might ask Nikon if they have any plans for it.

    dave
     
    Dave, Sep 7, 2008
    #2
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  3. Dave

    John Smith Guest

    You mean to tell me that my Spot Meter in my D3 is useless when shooting
    RAW? I haven't found that to be the case at all...


    "Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > If you shoot RAW it is a waste to use anything other
    > than AUTO for WB. With AUTO you get the data for
    > whatever the camera calculated it to be, with anything
    > else that data is discarded, and the data for whatever
    > you set is kept as the Exif data instead. Of course
    > with RAW it isn't used at all by the camera, and your
    > RAW converter can use any of the presets regardless of
    > what the camera was set to, except it can't use the
    > camera's idea of AUTO WB unless that data is saved via
    > setting it to AUTO.
    >
     
    John Smith, Sep 8, 2008
    #3
  4. Dave

    Paul Furman Guest

    Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
    > "John Smith" <> wrote:
    >> You mean to tell me that my Spot Meter in my D3 is useless when shooting
    >> RAW? I haven't found that to be the case at all...

    >
    > The spot meter has nothing to do with White Balance,
    > AUTO or otherwise.
    >
    > Spot metering is one of the modes for measuring light *intensity*.
    >
    > White Balance is for measuring light *color* *temperature*.
    >
    > Vastly difference tools...
    >
    >> "Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> If you shoot RAW it is a waste to use anything other
    >>> than AUTO for WB. With AUTO you get the data for
    >>> whatever the camera calculated it to be, with anything
    >>> else that data is discarded, and the data for whatever
    >>> you set is kept as the Exif data instead. Of course
    >>> with RAW it isn't used at all by the camera, and your
    >>> RAW converter can use any of the presets regardless of
    >>> what the camera was set to, except it can't use the
    >>> camera's idea of AUTO WB unless that data is saved via
    >>> setting it to AUTO.


    It is true that Nikon's auto WB on the D200 & D700 is a lot better than
    Photoshop CS1's auto WB in my experience.

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Sep 8, 2008
    #4
  5. Dave

    John Smith Guest

    Oops, my mistake. I misread your post. My apologies.


    "Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "John Smith" <> wrote:
    >>You mean to tell me that my Spot Meter in my D3 is useless when shooting
    >>RAW? I haven't found that to be the case at all...

    >
    > The spot meter has nothing to do with White Balance,
    > AUTO or otherwise.
    >
    > Spot metering is one of the modes for measuring light *intensity*.
    >
    > White Balance is for measuring light *color* *temperature*.
    >
    > Vastly difference tools...
    >
    >>"Floyd L. Davidson" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>>
    >>> If you shoot RAW it is a waste to use anything other
    >>> than AUTO for WB. With AUTO you get the data for
    >>> whatever the camera calculated it to be, with anything
    >>> else that data is discarded, and the data for whatever
    >>> you set is kept as the Exif data instead. Of course
    >>> with RAW it isn't used at all by the camera, and your
    >>> RAW converter can use any of the presets regardless of
    >>> what the camera was set to, except it can't use the
    >>> camera's idea of AUTO WB unless that data is saved via
    >>> setting it to AUTO.

    >
    > --
    > Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    > Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    John Smith, Sep 8, 2008
    #5
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