can anyone here ballroom dance?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Brian, Nov 14, 2006.

  1. Brian

    Brian Guest

    How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
    foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?

    Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
    younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
    unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
    life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
    dances would prove useful?
     
    Brian, Nov 14, 2006
    #1
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  2. Brian

    G. Morgan Guest

    On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 10:59:48 GMT, "Brian" <> wrote:

    >How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    >(college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
    >foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
    >
    >Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
    >younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
    >unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
    >life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
    >dances would prove useful?
    >



    It's only useful in Hawaii, in my opinion.


    --

    -Graham

    (delete the double e's to email)
     
    G. Morgan, Nov 14, 2006
    #2
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  3. Brian

    Brian Guest

    What do you mean?


    "G. Morgan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 10:59:48 GMT, "Brian" <> wrote:
    >
    >>How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    >>(college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
    >>foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
    >>
    >>Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
    >>younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
    >>unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
    >>life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
    >>dances would prove useful?
    >>

    >
    >
    > It's only useful in Hawaii, in my opinion.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > -Graham
    >
    > (delete the double e's to email)
     
    Brian, Nov 14, 2006
    #3
  4. Brian

    samuel Guest

    G. Morgan <> wrote in
    news::

    > On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 10:59:48 GMT, "Brian" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>How important do you all think it is for the younger
    >>generation (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance,
    >>such as the tango, foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of
    >>that type?
    >>
    >>Is this form of dance something that would prove to be
    >>beneficial for the younger generation to learn and be able to
    >>use at some point in life, or unlikely? Granted it is a given
    >>as being 'good to know' like much else in life, what is the
    >>reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
    >>dances would prove useful?

    >
    > It's only useful in Hawaii, in my opinion.


    more so than hula ? <g>
     
    samuel, Nov 14, 2006
    #4
  5. Brian

    Old Gringo Guest

    On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 10:59:48 GMT, Brian wrote:

    > How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    > (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
    > foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
    >
    > Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
    > younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
    > unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
    > life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
    > dances would prove useful?


    "Put a little fun in your life, Try dancing." (Kathryn Murray)
    http://www.arthurmurray.com/index.htm

    --
    Just West Of Nowhere
    Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
    Http://www.nuboy-industries.com
    11/14/2006 6:20:16 AM CST-USA
     
    Old Gringo, Nov 14, 2006
    #5
  6. Brian

    Jack Gillis Guest

    Was you question based on watching Dancing With The Stars? :) Here is
    probably more than you want to know and it will probably bring some fire
    down on me for responding to post not techology releated but here goes
    anyway.

    I think it is certainly desirable that youngsters if not everyone learn to
    dance to some extent. However, I think the whole list of ballroom dances is
    useless in the real, social world. I would teach them some sort of Swing
    (West Coast, East Coat or the Carolina Shag, my favorite even though it is
    not considered a ballroom dance), Waltz Cha Cha and Rumba. The basic Rumba
    steps can be done to almost any kind of slower 4/4 music while staying in
    one spot on the floor. The others you mention pretty much require
    travelling around the floor and that is almost impossible in a social
    situation. Another non-ballroom dance my wife and I use often is the Night
    Club Two Step, a dance that can be done on a crowded floor to 4/4 music and
    in one spot. I doubt very seriously that you would here a Tango played by a
    band or a DJ unless you specifically requested it and then maybe not.

    Some thing occured several years ago. We asked a band to play a Rumba.
    Their response was, "We don't play that kinda music." Then we asked, "Well
    how about Jimmy Buffet's Margaritavill. "Oh sure", was the reply. Great
    Rumba it was.

    Most dancers have their own opinon of which dances are most useful but the
    above are mine and my reasons for them.

    Belly Roll for Ever.

    "Brian" <> wrote in message
    news:Ekh6h.10701$...
    > How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    > (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
    > foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
    >
    > Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
    > younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
    > unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
    > life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
    > dances would prove useful?
    >
     
    Jack Gillis, Nov 14, 2006
    #6
  7. Brian

    Frosty Guest

    I downloaded new messages from 24hoursupport.helpdesk on Tue, 14 Nov
    2006 10:59:48 GMT, and "Brian" <> puked this bit of
    wisdom all over my shoes:

    >How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    >(college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
    >foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
    >
    >Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
    >younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
    >unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
    >life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
    >dances would prove useful?
    >



    Fer sure learn as many steps as possible.
    You WILL get laid, and by well tuned ladies!

    2ยข
     
    Frosty, Nov 14, 2006
    #7
  8. Brian

    Kenny Guest

    From today's Daily Mirror.

    THE HEARTBEAT WALTZ
    Heart attack sufferers can get better by learning to waltz, according to a
    new study. Italian researchers found the dance was as effective as a
    treadmill for improving circulation after cardiac problems.

    --
    Kenny Cargill

    "Jack Gillis" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Was you question based on watching Dancing With The Stars? :) Here is
    > probably more than you want to know and it will probably bring some fire
    > down on me for responding to post not techology releated but here goes
    > anyway.
    >
    > I think it is certainly desirable that youngsters if not everyone learn to
    > dance to some extent. However, I think the whole list of ballroom dances
    > is useless in the real, social world. I would teach them some sort of
    > Swing (West Coast, East Coat or the Carolina Shag, my favorite even though
    > it is not considered a ballroom dance), Waltz Cha Cha and Rumba. The
    > basic Rumba steps can be done to almost any kind of slower 4/4 music
    > while staying in one spot on the floor. The others you mention pretty
    > much require travelling around the floor and that is almost impossible in
    > a social situation. Another non-ballroom dance my wife and I use often is
    > the Night Club Two Step, a dance that can be done on a crowded floor to
    > 4/4 music and in one spot. I doubt very seriously that you would here a
    > Tango played by a band or a DJ unless you specifically requested it and
    > then maybe not.
    >
    > Some thing occured several years ago. We asked a band to play a Rumba.
    > Their response was, "We don't play that kinda music." Then we asked,
    > "Well how about Jimmy Buffet's Margaritavill. "Oh sure", was the reply.
    > Great Rumba it was.
    >
    > Most dancers have their own opinon of which dances are most useful but the
    > above are mine and my reasons for them.
    >
    > Belly Roll for Ever.
    >
    > "Brian" <> wrote in message
    > news:Ekh6h.10701$...
    >> How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    >> (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
    >> foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
    >>
    >> Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
    >> younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
    >> unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
    >> life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing
    >> such dances would prove useful?
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Kenny, Nov 14, 2006
    #8
  9. Brian

    Tony Guest

    "Jack Gillis" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Was you question based on watching Dancing With The Stars? :) Here is
    > probably more than you want to know and it will probably bring some fire
    > down on me for responding to post not techology releated but here goes
    > anyway.
    >
    > I think it is certainly desirable that youngsters if not everyone learn to
    > dance to some extent. However, I think the whole list of ballroom dances
    > is useless in the real, social world. I would teach them some sort of
    > Swing (West Coast, East Coat or the Carolina Shag, my favorite even though
    > it is not considered a ballroom dance), Waltz Cha Cha and Rumba. The
    > basic Rumba steps can be done to almost any kind of slower 4/4 music
    > while staying in one spot on the floor. The others you mention pretty
    > much require travelling around the floor and that is almost impossible in
    > a social situation. Another non-ballroom dance my wife and I use often is
    > the Night Club Two Step, a dance that can be done on a crowded floor to
    > 4/4 music and in one spot. I doubt very seriously that you would here a
    > Tango played by a band or a DJ unless you specifically requested it and
    > then maybe not.
    >
    > Some thing occured several years ago. We asked a band to play a Rumba.
    > Their response was, "We don't play that kinda music." Then we asked,
    > "Well how about Jimmy Buffet's Margaritavill. "Oh sure", was the reply.
    > Great Rumba it was.
    >
    > Most dancers have their own opinon of which dances are most useful but the
    > above are mine and my reasons for them.
    >
    > Belly Roll for Ever.
    >


    I do a bit of DJ'ing as a hobby and find that there is a vast difference
    between what DJ's consider the correct type of music to play. I do often
    play "ballroom" sets but a lot depends on the clientele and age group. It
    definitely requires more skill than bopping up and down to disco music which
    often people don't do until they have had a few drinks.

    If teaching younger people to ballroom dance would help the younger
    generation learn the art of enjoying themselves without the use of copious
    amounts of alcohol, then it definitely is a good idea :)
     
    Tony, Nov 14, 2006
    #9
  10. Brian

    Mike Easter Guest

    Brian wrote:
    > How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    > (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
    > foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
    >
    > Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for
    > the younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in
    > life, or unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like
    > much else in life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance
    > where knowing such dances would prove useful?


    Of _course_ it is important!

    How would the movie The Scent of a Woman have been without the tango
    scene between Al Pacino and Gabrielle Anwar?

    'Nuff said!

    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Nov 14, 2006
    #10
  11. "Brian Nospam" lamented his lack of social pre-cognition in
    news:Ekh6h.10701$:
    >
    > How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    > (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the
    > tango, foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
    >
    > Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial
    > for the younger generation to learn and be able to use at some
    > point in life, or unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good
    > to know' like much else in life, what is the reality of the
    > frequency of occurance where knowing such dances would prove
    > useful?



    "folk" being the operative term hereto, if you're gay, I don't know
    what impact that would have on the overall importance of the salient
    issue being presented. "(college-aged folk in wheelchairs)" might be
    substantive information bearing upon some realistic dilemma.

    "Important" being the operative term hereto, the instant response
    would be "not so much." Why learn to hunt when you can buy hamburger
    at the supermarket, ehh? And, if you like the 'Hamburger Helper',
    you'll likely have a really full and happy life. (Except that part
    where the presevatives start to cause all kinds of obscure diseases
    and finally kill 'ya.)

    The broader aspect of your query could be most efficiently addressed
    by answering a question with a question: to wit, "Why do unversities
    continue to teach the Humanities?" You think they might just be
    stoopedeer than you am? Or stuck in an institutional rote-rut?

    It's not so much an issue of whether you're *always* going to use the
    exact knowledge and skills obtained by study and practice and
    eventual mastery; so much as, it is a point of factual applied
    experience that when the occasion arises from which you can likely
    most profit from the knowledge and exercise, you have adequately
    prepared for success in a much broader scope of endeavors or
    situations. Or, you can pull from a vast pool of knowledge and
    experience and more likely be able to adapt these elements in a fluid
    and dynamic environment to obtain a more successful result than
    escape and avoidance. Victory is the nectar of life.

    "But mommie, I don't want to go on the little pottie! I like my
    diapers!" "Oh mommie, why do I have to learn to tie my shoes? But
    it's so hard, and can't you just buy me the velcro one's for the rest
    of my pathetic life?" "No, don't take off the training wheels because
    they work for me." "Oh daddy, why do I have to learn to tie my
    necktie, can't I just use the clip-on's? Everyone else does!" "Why
    should I have to learn to drive a stick-shift when automatic
    transmissions are all the rage?"

    You may ask "Why is it necessary to sudy language composition when
    other primates do just fine by pooping in their hands and throwing it
    at each other and smelling each other's butts until they get what
    they're looking for?"

    Dance is viewed to be cultural, art, communication; plus to some,
    relaxation and/or exercise; to others a sign of intelligence, grace
    and refinement. To some, it's just a job. Finer dance has many
    elements of composition, communication, mathmatics, gymnastics,
    balance and coordination, etc. Plus, most of the "classic" style
    dances *are* "classic" because they lend themselves to melding into
    more contemporary styles of musical intrepretation - and have
    repeatedly done so with excellent results through many decades. (Just
    between me and you, once you get one down pat mechanically, the rest
    of them come progressively more easy. The mechanics is one thing; the
    art and flow is just a state of mind.)

    Case in point: I can two-step *to* *anything*, and look good doing
    it! I'm not bragging, here, I'm just saying what it is, just is.
    Two-step (Texas or Tennessee) is just good basics, easy to lead and
    easy to follow and easy to adapt. The thing is, if that's all I ever
    did, I'd appear to be somewhat limited. Hmmm... I *would* by
    definition be somewhat limited.

    Ballroom dance is teamwork, and requires as well as develops
    communications skills. It's like during a waltz or a foxtrot at a
    white tie event in Luxembourg and you're dancing with a beautiful
    European ambassador's staff assistant who speaks perfect English, as
    well as 8 other languages, perhaps 5 years older than you, but a
    timeless beauty nonetheless: there's just nothing like the thrill you
    both share from "thinking" about your next maneuver, and without any
    spoken word - only constant eye-contact; she just knows exactly what
    it is, and executes it in perfect harmony with you! She occupies my
    soul, and I hers, and only the choruses of angels are in the room
    with us in that particular time-space continuum - while all other
    life flutters down into slow-motion blurriness. Then, her per-usual
    upper-crusty wanna-be suitors start to notice her unusually warm
    smile and fluid, graceful movements... and we ignore their attempts
    to "cut-in" with brief polite glances, smiles and acknowledging nods
    while we segue with the orchestra into a post-modern Brazilian tango
    routine (*not* Argentinian - but we could, if that's the effect we
    were after -- you see this is all about rhythm and grace, not pure
    unbridled lack of sexual inhibition) - mechanically simple, but
    emotionally complex... and next thing you know, you're all naked and
    trying to gently slip-out your arm from under her unclothed body
    being careful to not awaken her peacful, slow-deep-breathing and
    smiling countenance so you can get the heck out of her suite via the
    terrace doors before her security guards realize that you're there
    and gone. (Don't piss and moan here - I left her my card, and we
    have... ehhh, been in occasional contact since.)

    In simple terms: it definitely creates, opens, improves, and
    otherwise works unconventional brain synapse circuits, and if you
    want to favorably impress the really refined females, it's another
    great tool in the old toolbox - anybody can conquer the carnal
    desires of the enhanced-blonde trailer-park boobalicious-babe by
    sending her another Long Island Iced Tea and shaking your butt to
    Lynard Skynard in the local jukebox-joint, get drunk and make babies
    that you have to bail out of jail and tell them "kollage is fer
    queers" for the next 30 years or so (because you're not getting any
    overtime at the plant and you spent their college funds for bail
    money, beer and child-support payments to other indiscretions...);
    but it takes a litte more effort to conquer the heart of a really
    fine aristocratic debutante or diva. And the secret is: you do that
    by first knowing and conquering yourself.

    In fact, it's all like the basic concept of "college" in general:
    what do you want to do with the rest of your life? You certainly
    can't do what you're not prepared for. So, while you're preparing,
    you may as well get prepared.

    And last, but not least: You could find yourself out West in a small
    town of aged wood buildings on only one dirt road with many horses
    still utilized for transportation, and while at the Saloon to wet
    your dusty whistle, but getting a little tipsey, make some regulars
    really mad by hitting on Miss Kitty, and they throw you out the
    double doors, onto the road, and as your getting up and dusting off
    your britches about 5 of them pull out their guns and start shooting
    the ground at your feet and say "Dance, Dude, dance!" What are you
    supposed to do? Say "Time-out! Time-out! I didn't take dance in
    college." Well, sparky, it's not very likely that they'll say "Oh,
    exxxx-cuuuusee us - very well, then program something in Fortran."

    So, Brian Nospam, there are a few reasons which tend to lean in favor
    of learning some ballroom dance techniques if that's been presented
    as an option. What were your reasons which tended to lean against
    learning some new-old stuff which prompted you to ask the question?


    Best regards.

    --

    Somebody told me that it was extremely frightening
    how much topsoil we are losing each year;
    but, once, I told that story around the campfire
    - and nobody got scared.
     
    Bucky Breeder, Nov 14, 2006
    #11
  12. Brian

    Spuds Guest

    On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 10:59:48 GMT, "Brian" <> wrote:

    >How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    >(college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
    >foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
    >
    >Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
    >younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
    >unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
    >life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
    >dances would prove useful?


    If I had a dollar for every job interview that went south when they found I
    couldn't Foxtrot....

    --

    "There is nothing worse than aggressive stupidity."
    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
     
    Spuds, Nov 14, 2006
    #12
  13. Brian

    Moose Groops Guest

    Brian wrote:
    > How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
    > (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the <SNIP>


    Well, if it keeps them off CRACK then I suppose it's useful.
     
    Moose Groops, Nov 15, 2006
    #13
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