Can anyone advise on laptops and Wifi (UK)

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mr.Will, Sep 3, 2004.

  1. Mr.Will

    Mr.Will Guest

    Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.

    I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you need
    to be near a port for that.

    Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one looking
    at when connecting this way/

    If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most grateful. Im
    sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    laptops or WIFI working.

    Mr.Will
    Mr.Will, Sep 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. Mr.Will

    ;o\)-max- Guest

    "Mr.Will"
    > Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    > This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.
    >
    > I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    > equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    > bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    > what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you need
    > to be near a port for that.
    >
    > Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one looking
    > at when connecting this way/
    >
    > If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most grateful. Im
    > sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    > laptops or WIFI working.
    >
    > Mr.Will


    Surely your agency has experience in this area - why don't
    you ask them..! They may even have their own satelite
    connection.. ;o))-max-
    ;o\)-max-, Sep 4, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Mr.Will

    Mr.Will Guest

    ";o)-max-" <> wrote in message
    news:aR6_c.42962$...
    > "Mr.Will"
    > > Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    > > This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.
    > >
    > > I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    > > equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    > > bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    > > what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you

    need
    > > to be near a port for that.
    > >
    > > Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one

    looking
    > > at when connecting this way/
    > >
    > > If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most

    grateful. Im
    > > sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    > > laptops or WIFI working.
    > >
    > > Mr.Will

    >
    > Surely your agency has experience in this area - why don't
    > you ask them..! They may even have their own satelite
    > connection.. ;o))-max-
    >


    I did, but all their experience is USA-side and they are wanting to break
    ground in the UK if that makes sense.

    Mr.Will
    Mr.Will, Sep 4, 2004
    #3
  4. Mr.Will

    Steven Guest

    you need a laptop with wifi built in or a card to go into the laptop.
    Yes you need to be close to use the wifi hotspot. this web site will
    locate all wifi hotspots for you http://www.wifi411.com/. You cold
    take your photos then at your home email or send them to the agency I
    dont really think they need them that fast.

    Steve






    On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 22:51:21 GMT, "Mr.Will" <>
    wrote:

    >Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    >This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.
    >
    >I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    >equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    >bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    >what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you need
    >to be near a port for that.
    >
    >Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one looking
    >at when connecting this way/
    >
    >If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most grateful. Im
    >sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    >laptops or WIFI working.
    >
    >Mr.Will
    >
    Steven, Sep 4, 2004
    #4
  5. "Mr.Will" <> wrote in message
    news:Jz6_c.531$...
    > Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    > This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.
    >
    > I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    > equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    > bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    > what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you

    need
    > to be near a port for that.
    >
    > Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one looking
    > at when connecting this way/
    >
    > If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most grateful.

    Im
    > sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    > laptops or WIFI working.


    Wi-Fi is wireless networking- it is very fast, depending on what you have
    the transfer speeds are in the mb/sec. Obviously, as it's networking this is
    only good for transferring to another wi-fi computer nearby- a few metres,
    ideally. If you need to send photos across the internet, you don't
    necessarily need Wi-Fi... you need broadband internet access.

    That is a matter for wiser people than I, as I still use 56Kbps internet.
    Assuming you have a Wi-Fi laptop, you should be able to find a Wi-Fi
    internet access point- they seem fairly common in Birmingham, UK, but it
    *is* the second city- to get your laptop online and email your photos to
    whoever needs it.

    --
    Martin Francis http://www.sixbysix.co.uk
    "Go not to Usenet for counsel, for it will say both no, and yes, and
    no, and yes...."
    Martin Francis, Sep 4, 2004
    #5
  6. There is a trial in Bristol

    Wifi was tried in the UK a few years ago

    last time I looked even the wifi website were out of date and the whole
    thing had a Marie Celeste feel about it

    Conference venues, and some private venues provide wifi by pre-arrangement

    if i remember correctly the issues are security related

    Articus

    "Mr.Will" <> wrote in message
    news:Jz6_c.531$...
    > Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    > This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.
    >
    > I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    > equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    > bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    > what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you
    > need
    > to be near a port for that.
    >
    > Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one looking
    > at when connecting this way/
    >
    > If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most grateful.
    > Im
    > sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    > laptops or WIFI working.
    >
    > Mr.Will
    >
    >
    Articus Drools, Sep 4, 2004
    #6
  7. Mr.Will

    Clyde Torres Guest

    "Mr.Will" <> wrote in message
    news:Jz6_c.531$...
    > Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    > This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.
    >
    > I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    > equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    > bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    > what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you

    need
    > to be near a port for that.
    >
    > Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one looking
    > at when connecting this way/
    >
    > If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most grateful.

    Im
    > sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    > laptops or WIFI working.
    >
    > Mr.Will


    Mr. Will,

    I am not at the University of Kentucky, but I will relate to you what I do
    here in the colonies.

    I travel all over the USA and have the need to send rather large design
    files over the internet to clients located all over the place. I have found
    that by driving around, I can pick up people's WiFi routers. Some of them
    are connected to the internet, some aren't. Typically if someone has WiFi,
    either 802.11b or 802.11g, they have broadband access to the internet.
    Also, typically, my large files do not bog down their connection, since they
    typically aren't home during the day. I can tell this, because I know how
    long it takes to transmit these files, and if I were creating a bottleneck,
    I would know it. Of course all this assumes that the link is not encrypted
    (WEP), and very few are.

    Also, in the USA, there are free and legitimate WiFi links all over the
    place. Panera Bread is one example, and they are all over the USA. I
    typically work in about eight USA cities and have a good feel for where all
    the free and legitimate links are. If I am in a hurry, like I'm going to
    lunch, and I'm not near a free link, then I will do a drive by connection to
    someone's unencrypted link. I will have everything ready to go, i.e., the
    email is already set up such that all I have to do is connect, send, receive
    and drive off.

    You might even get lucky and connect right there at your work location to
    someone near you. You need the WiFi equipment to verify this, of course.

    I have never had a problem with this method.

    Clyde Torres
    Clyde Torres, Sep 4, 2004
    #7
  8. Mr.Will

    Lisa Horton Guest

    WiFi is designed for local networking, not for long distance or wide
    areas.

    You may want to look into a cellular modem card for your laptop. This
    will give you Internet access wherever you get a phone signal (from your
    provider). It is not, however, free like driving around looking for
    open WiFi networks is.

    Lisa

    "Mr.Will" wrote:
    >
    > Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    > This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.
    >
    > I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    > equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    > bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    > what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you need
    > to be near a port for that.
    >
    > Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one looking
    > at when connecting this way/
    >
    > If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most grateful. Im
    > sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    > laptops or WIFI working.
    >
    > Mr.Will
    Lisa Horton, Sep 4, 2004
    #8
  9. "Mr.Will" <> writes:

    > Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    > This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.
    >
    > I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    > equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    > bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    > what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you need
    > to be near a port for that.
    >
    > Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one looking
    > at when connecting this way/
    >
    > If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most grateful. Im
    > sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    > laptops or WIFI working.


    I most commonly hear "WIFI hot-spot" or "Wireless Access Point" for
    that.

    In the UK, it might be worth looking into 3G phones/service, which
    gives much faster data connectivity than older phones and services.
    I'm not there so I don't know how good coverage is or what exactly is
    available. (Then the laptop needs to connect to the phone via cable
    or bluetooth.)
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
    David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 4, 2004
    #9
  10. Lisa Horton <> writes:

    > WiFi is designed for local networking, not for long distance or wide
    > areas.


    True, and not true. Nearly every place with a WiFi access point is
    connected to the Internet via broadband, and you can get to the
    internet through the WiFi connection.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
    David Dyer-Bennet, Sep 4, 2004
    #10
  11. David Dyer-Bennet wrote:

    > Lisa Horton <> writes:
    >
    >
    >>WiFi is designed for local networking, not for long distance or wide
    >>areas.

    >
    >
    > True, and not true. Nearly every place with a WiFi access point is
    > connected to the Internet via broadband, and you can get to the
    > internet through the WiFi connection.


    In any event, you appear to be trying to tackle two new things at once.
    Learn first the ins and outs of non-WiFi transmission that you'll need
    to do, and how to do it quickly and well. Send test images, etc., learn
    sizes you'll need to send, upload speeds, and deadlines.

    You don't need WiFi, and until you are used to it a bit, it's likely to
    be a time-consumer rather than a time saver.

    Best of luck

    --
    John McWilliams
    John McWilliams, Sep 4, 2004
    #11
  12. Mr.Will

    Networkguy Guest

    You have 2 options if you want to send large files in the field.

    1. Use GPRS (maybe using bluetooth on your mobile phone) which is not cheap
    and is very slow for big files. It will work just about anywhere though. You
    could also look at the new 3G options but at the moment, coverage is a bit
    thin outside of big cities.

    2. WiFi. For this, you would need to locate a "hot spot" and subscribe.
    Typically, these can be found in coffee shops, McDonalds, Hotels, train
    stations etc. You would need to find your nearest hot spot to where you are
    and travel there but one there (drinking your coffee and eating your
    burger), you are typically looking at broadband speeds.

    Of course you could always wait until you get home (or back to the office)
    :)
    Networkguy, Sep 4, 2004
    #12
  13. Mr.Will

    Mr.Will Guest

    Many thanks, this is exactly the kind of thing I needed!
    Seems that WIFI is available nearly everywhere, thinking that is the best
    option!

    Mr.Will

    "Steven " <dfw$> wrote in message
    news:...
    > you need a laptop with wifi built in or a card to go into the laptop.
    > Yes you need to be close to use the wifi hotspot. this web site will
    > locate all wifi hotspots for you http://www.wifi411.com/. You cold
    > take your photos then at your home email or send them to the agency I
    > dont really think they need them that fast.
    >
    > Steve
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 22:51:21 GMT, "Mr.Will" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    > >This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.
    > >
    > >I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    > >equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    > >bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    > >what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you

    need
    > >to be near a port for that.
    > >
    > >Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one

    looking
    > >at when connecting this way/
    > >
    > >If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most grateful.

    Im
    > >sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    > >laptops or WIFI working.
    > >
    > >Mr.Will
    > >

    >
    Mr.Will, Sep 4, 2004
    #13
  14. Mr.Will

    Matt Ion Guest

    Mr.Will wrote:
    > Recently I got in with a photo wire agency who need photographs quickly.
    > This venture is USA-based but needs photographs from the UK.
    >
    > I thought it would be a simple matter of buying laptop and wireless
    > equipment, however I am scratching my head in dismay. From what I gather
    > bluetooth is through a phone, but unreliable and slow, the WIFI thing is
    > what is on tv with the Centrino "ampitheatre" show, but apparently you need
    > to be near a port for that.


    Correct on WiFi (the "ports" are generally termed "hotspots"); it's
    intended only for short-range use - up to 100ft. indoors, 300ft.
    outdoors (or unobstructed indoors).

    Bluetooth is more of a close-range (shorter than short-range :) system
    designed for interfacing devices like PDAs, phones, computers and
    accessories within 50ft. or so. It's generally used for such things as
    syncing PDAs to each other and to computers, or in your case, connecting
    your data-cabapble wireless phone to your laptop.

    > Are WIFI ports common now in the UK, and what sort of speed is one looking
    > at when connecting this way/


    You can try using a site like www.80211hotspots.com or www.wifinder.com
    (or better yet, do a Google search for "wifi hotspots uk", which gave me
    such sites as "Hotspotted - WiFi Hotspots in London and UK"
    www.hotspotted.com and www.wifi-hotspots.co.uk) to search for published
    hotspot sites at your destination, and you may want to pick up a hotspot
    finder (a larger-keychain-sized device that will light up LEDs to show
    you if you're in a hotspot and the strength of the signal).

    With a solid signal, a standard 802.11b hotspot will give you 11Mbit/s,
    and if your laptop supports it, an 802.11g hotspot will give you up to
    54Mbit/s.

    > If anyone can shed ANY light on what Im asking, I would be most grateful. Im
    > sorry if the questions are phrased badly, I honestly havent a clue about
    > laptops or WIFI working.


    What you probably want for your needs, is a wireless data card for your
    laptop, or use your phone via bluetooth interface if the phone supports
    wireless data (not the same as WiFi). I believe Europe is mostly GSM
    for wireless phones (same as Rogers in Canada; dunno about the US), and
    AFAIK most newer GSM phones are data-enabled.

    The catch is, you need a high-speed data account with your carrier; most
    data-enabled phones will also work as a standard modem and can dialup a
    regular ISP, but only at 14.4k. Your service provider will give you the
    necessary setup information when you sign up for a wireless data service.
    Matt Ion, Sep 5, 2004
    #14
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