Cameras and planes

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mike, Aug 10, 2006.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Following the foiled terror attacks on planes between Britain and the US, no
    hand luggage at all can be taken onto any flights. How are photographers
    going to deal with this? For me, there is absolutely no way I would pack my
    gear (worth about £5,000) in with my luggage. If I was making a journey
    tomorrow, I would have to either go camera-less (so not much point in going
    at all) or cancel.

    Link to the story:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4780815.stm
     
    Mike, Aug 10, 2006
    #1
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  2. Mike

    Joe Guest

    I was thinking the same. Same with laptops, etc. If you had to put your
    camera bag in the hold, would it be covered for damage by the Airlines
    insurance and is it likely to be damaged?

    Don't get me wrong, possessions are replaceable, human safety isn't, so I am
    all for what the officials are doing. However, I am unsure about travelling
    with decent camera equipment.


    "Mike" <> wrote in message
    news:ebg244$7hc$...
    > Following the foiled terror attacks on planes between Britain and the US,
    > no hand luggage at all can be taken onto any flights. How are
    > photographers going to deal with this? For me, there is absolutely no way
    > I would pack my gear (worth about £5,000) in with my luggage. If I was
    > making a journey tomorrow, I would have to either go camera-less (so not
    > much point in going at all) or cancel.
    >
    > Link to the story:
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4780815.stm
    >
     
    Joe, Aug 10, 2006
    #2
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  3. Mike

    Guest

    Mike wrote:
    > Following the foiled terror attacks on planes between Britain and the US, no
    > hand luggage at all can be taken onto any flights. How are photographers
    > going to deal with this? For me, there is absolutely no way I would pack my
    > gear (worth about £5,000) in with my luggage.


    So DRIVE if it's a domestic trip. Domestic air travel is a
    *convenience* industry - predicated on travelers actually getting there
    faster than if they'd driven! Britain is a small nation - and air
    travel for the foreseeable future sounds like it will take far longer
    (when all ground time, including checkin and security as well as drive
    to/from airports is considered) than if you just drove.

    No $4 to park! No $6 admission! http://www.INTERNET-GUN-SHOW.com
     
    , Aug 10, 2006
    #3
  4. Mike

    Helen Guest

    "Mike" <> wrote in message
    news:ebg244$7hc$...
    > Following the foiled terror attacks on planes between Britain and the US,
    > no hand luggage at all can be taken onto any flights. How are
    > photographers going to deal with this? For me, there is absolutely no way
    > I would pack my gear (worth about £5,000) in with my luggage. If I was
    > making a journey tomorrow, I would have to either go camera-less (so not
    > much point in going at all) or cancel.
    >


    How do you expect them to deal with it? It strikes me that they have very
    few options, one is cancel the trip, the other is put the gear in the hold.
    I cancelled a proposed job in Norway next week just an hour and a half ago.

    H (in England)
     
    Helen, Aug 10, 2006
    #4
  5. Mike

    Paul Heslop Guest

    Mike wrote:
    >
    > Following the foiled terror attacks on planes between Britain and the US, no
    > hand luggage at all can be taken onto any flights. How are photographers
    > going to deal with this? For me, there is absolutely no way I would pack my
    > gear (worth about £5,000) in with my luggage. If I was making a journey
    > tomorrow, I would have to either go camera-less (so not much point in going
    > at all) or cancel.
    >
    > Link to the story:
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4780815.stm


    It seems that small electronic devices, ie ipods etc may be part of
    the plot, aswell as liquids. I would assume digital cameras would be
    classed as risky too.

    --
    Paul (Neurotic to the bone No doubt about it)
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Stop and Look
    http://www.geocities.com/dreamst8me/
     
    Paul Heslop, Aug 10, 2006
    #5
  6. Mike

    Joe Guest

    He lives in the UK, not USA. The '£' sign should have been a clue.

    In addition to this, UK is not a 'small nation', Canada is 'small' in
    comparison.

    FYI, the question was not about the time taking to get through airport
    security. So, how about you actually read the post?


    <> wrote in message
    news:...

    So DRIVE if it's a domestic trip. Domestic air travel is a
    *convenience* industry - predicated on travelers actually getting there
    faster than if they'd driven! Britain is a small nation - and air
    travel for the foreseeable future sounds like it will take far longer
    (when all ground time, including checkin and security as well as drive
    to/from airports is considered) than if you just drove.

    No $4 to park! No $6 admission! http://www.INTERNET-GUN-SHOW.com
     
    Joe, Aug 10, 2006
    #6
  7. Mike

    Bert Hyman Guest

    (Joe) wrote in news::

    > In addition to this, UK is not a 'small nation', Canada is 'small' in
    > comparison.


    By what measure?

    According to the CIA "World Fact Book", the UK occupies 241,590 sq km,
    and is "slightly smaller than Oregon", while Canada occupies 9,093,507
    sq km and is "somewhat larger than the US."

    --
    Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
     
    Bert Hyman, Aug 10, 2006
    #7
  8. Mike

    Joe Guest

    Population.


    "Bert Hyman" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns981B9D00325ACVeebleFetzer@127.0.0.1...
    > (Joe) wrote in news::
    >
    >> In addition to this, UK is not a 'small nation', Canada is 'small' in
    >> comparison.

    >
    > By what measure?
    >
    > According to the CIA "World Fact Book", the UK occupies 241,590 sq km,
    > and is "slightly smaller than Oregon", while Canada occupies 9,093,507
    > sq km and is "somewhat larger than the US."
    >
    > --
    > Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
     
    Joe, Aug 10, 2006
    #8
  9. Mike

    Bert Hyman Guest

    (Joe) wrote in
    news::

    > Population.


    Since the original comment was offered in the context of driving time
    vs. flying, I can't imagine why you'd offer that.

    > "Bert Hyman" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns981B9D00325ACVeebleFetzer@127.0.0.1...
    >> (Joe) wrote in
    >> news::
    >>
    >>> In addition to this, UK is not a 'small nation', Canada is
    >>> 'small' in comparison.

    >>
    >> By what measure?
    >>
    >> According to the CIA "World Fact Book", the UK occupies 241,590 sq
    >> km, and is "slightly smaller than Oregon", while Canada occupies
    >> 9,093,507 sq km and is "somewhat larger than the US."


    --
    Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
     
    Bert Hyman, Aug 10, 2006
    #9
  10. Mike

    Joe Guest

    Are you crazy or just stupid?

    How about you also learn to read posts.


    "Bert Hyman" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns981B9D9F2A8B6VeebleFetzer@127.0.0.1...

    > Since the original comment was offered in the context of driving time
    > vs. flying, I can't imagine why you'd offer that.
    >
     
    Joe, Aug 10, 2006
    #10
  11. Mike

    Bert Hyman Guest

    (Joe) wrote in news::

    > Are you crazy or just stupid?
    >
    > How about you also learn to read posts.


    Then please interpret this from the original post for me:

    "Britain is a small nation - and air travel for the foreseeable
    future sounds like it will take far longer (when all ground time,
    including checkin and security as well as drive to/from airports is
    considered) than if you just drove. "


    > "Bert Hyman" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns981B9D9F2A8B6VeebleFetzer@127.0.0.1...
    >
    >> Since the original comment was offered in the context of driving
    >> time vs. flying, I can't imagine why you'd offer that.



    --
    Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
     
    Bert Hyman, Aug 10, 2006
    #11
  12. ? "Paul Heslop" <> ?????? ??? ??????
    news:...
    Mike wrote:
    >
    > Following the foiled terror attacks on planes between Britain and the US,

    no
    > hand luggage at all can be taken onto any flights. How are photographers
    > going to deal with this? For me, there is absolutely no way I would pack

    my
    > gear (worth about £5,000) in with my luggage. If I was making a journey
    > tomorrow, I would have to either go camera-less (so not much point in

    going
    > at all) or cancel.
    >
    > Link to the story:
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4780815.stm


    It seems that small electronic devices, ie ipods etc may be part of
    the plot, aswell as liquids. I would assume digital cameras would be
    classed as risky too.

    How about getting a cheap P&S digital camera?


    --
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
    major in electrical engineering,freelance electrician
    542nd mechanized infantry batallion
    dimtzort AT otenet DOT gr
     
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios, Aug 10, 2006
    #12
  13. Mike

    Joe Guest

    Your quote isn't the original post, however, the snipped reply to the
    original post was:


    "He lives in the UK, not USA. The '£' sign should have been a clue."

    "FYI, the question was not about the time taking to get through airport
    security."





    "Bert Hyman" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns981B9F0DB1B99VeebleFetzer@127.0.0.1...
    > (Joe) wrote in news::
    >
    >
    > Then please interpret this from the original post for me:
    >
    > "Britain is a small nation - and air travel for the foreseeable
    > future sounds like it will take far longer (when all ground time,
    > including checkin and security as well as drive to/from airports is
    > considered) than if you just drove. "
    >
     
    Joe, Aug 10, 2006
    #13
  14. Mike

    Mike Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    Mike wrote:
    > Following the foiled terror attacks on planes between Britain and the US,
    > no
    > hand luggage at all can be taken onto any flights. How are photographers
    > going to deal with this? For me, there is absolutely no way I would pack
    > my
    > gear (worth about £5,000) in with my luggage.


    So DRIVE if it's a domestic trip. Domestic air travel is a
    *convenience* industry - predicated on travelers actually getting there
    faster than if they'd driven! Britain is a small nation - and air
    travel for the foreseeable future sounds like it will take far longer
    (when all ground time, including checkin and security as well as drive
    to/from airports is considered) than if you just drove.

    I wasn't worried about trips inside the UK - I never take internal flights!

    Cheers
     
    Mike, Aug 10, 2006
    #14
  15. Mike

    Alfred Molon Guest

    In article <ebg244$7hc$>, Mike says...
    > Following the foiled terror attacks on planes between Britain and the US, no
    > hand luggage at all can be taken onto any flights. How are photographers
    > going to deal with this? For me, there is absolutely no way I would pack my
    > gear (worth about £5,000) in with my luggage. If I was making a journey
    > tomorrow, I would have to either go camera-less (so not much point in going
    > at all) or cancel.


    Yes, indeed. Thanks to this incident UK photographers cannot travel
    internationally with their gear and other photographers living outside
    the UK cannot enter the UK with their cameras.

    And it's not just UK photographers, it's also UK business people who all
    of a sudden cannot carry their notebook computers with them - which
    means that international travel is sharply restricted, because nowadays
    any serious business traveller carries a notebook with him/herself.
    --

    Alfred Molon
    http://www.molon.de - Photos of Asia, Africa and Europe
     
    Alfred Molon, Aug 10, 2006
    #15
  16. Mike

    Joe Guest

    An obstacle, yes, however safety is more important.


    "Alfred Molon" <> wrote in message

    Yes, indeed. Thanks to this incident UK photographers cannot travel
    internationally with their gear and other photographers living outside
    the UK cannot enter the UK with their cameras.

    And it's not just UK photographers, it's also UK business people who all
    of a sudden cannot carry their notebook computers with them - which
    means that international travel is sharply restricted, because nowadays
    any serious business traveller carries a notebook with him/herself.
    --

    Alfred Molon
    http://www.molon.de - Photos of Asia, Africa and Europe
     
    Joe, Aug 10, 2006
    #16
  17. Mike

    ASAAR Guest

    On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 20:13:09 GMT, Paul Heslop wrote:

    > It seems that small electronic devices, ie ipods etc may be part of
    > the plot, aswell as liquids. I would assume digital cameras would be
    > classed as risky too.


    Some interviewed official mentioned that a camera's flash could be
    used as a triggering device. I doubt that security inspectors would
    be able to look at my camera and determine that the flash is not one
    of those that pops up automatically, nor that it doesn't have
    built-in remote control capability. I imagine that all cameras
    would be considered suspect, even the cheap disposable film variety.
     
    ASAAR, Aug 10, 2006
    #17
  18. Mike

    Fred Lebow Guest

    At times I have taken my digital cameras securely bundled and wrapped in
    clothing in my checked luggage.
    I have done the same w a laptop once or twice
    Which means if I have a long trip - I bring more bags or less clothing or I
    wear the same clothes for days or I walk around naked


    --
    Fred
    "Joe" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I was thinking the same. Same with laptops, etc. If you had to put your
    >camera bag in the hold, would it be covered for damage by the Airlines
    >insurance and is it likely to be damaged?
    >
    > Don't get me wrong, possessions are replaceable, human safety isn't, so I
    > am all for what the officials are doing. However, I am unsure about
    > travelling with decent camera equipment.
    >
    >
    > "Mike" <> wrote in message
    > news:ebg244$7hc$...
    >> Following the foiled terror attacks on planes between Britain and the US,
    >> no hand luggage at all can be taken onto any flights. How are
    >> photographers going to deal with this? For me, there is absolutely no way
    >> I would pack my gear (worth about £5,000) in with my luggage. If I was
    >> making a journey tomorrow, I would have to either go camera-less (so not
    >> much point in going at all) or cancel.
    >>
    >> Link to the story:
    >> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4780815.stm
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Fred Lebow, Aug 10, 2006
    #18
  19. Alfred Molon wrote:
    > In article <ebg244$7hc$>, Mike says...
    >
    >>Following the foiled terror attacks on planes between Britain and the US, no
    >>hand luggage at all can be taken onto any flights. How are photographers
    >>going to deal with this? For me, there is absolutely no way I would pack my
    >>gear (worth about £5,000) in with my luggage. If I was making a journey
    >>tomorrow, I would have to either go camera-less (so not much point in going
    >>at all) or cancel.

    >
    >
    > Yes, indeed. Thanks to this incident UK photographers cannot travel
    > internationally with their gear and other photographers living outside
    > the UK cannot enter the UK with their cameras.
    >
    > And it's not just UK photographers, it's also UK business people who all
    > of a sudden cannot carry their notebook computers with them - which
    > means that international travel is sharply restricted, because nowadays
    > any serious business traveller carries a notebook with him/herself.


    As I am flying today and have talked to US TSA security,
    I was told (by a TSA agent) that on all international
    flights leaving the US, no one will be allowed to carry on
    any materials. Passengers will be handed a small bag
    by the airlines, and you will be able to take NO personal
    things of any nature (question about medicine).
    No laptops, no cameras, no reading material, nothing.

    Airport concessions said buy the yogurt now as when it is
    gone there will be no more. It is a "gel" and no gels
    are allowed through security, even for concessions.

    These rules are a real problem for film shooters, with the high
    intensity checked bag x-ray will destroy film.

    Here in the US, we can still carry electronics, including
    laptops and cameras.

    I don't know how long these rules will stay in effect, but
    it puts a real damper on my travel. Maybe we'll have to send
    expensive gear ahead by fed ex.

    Roger
     
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Aug 10, 2006
    #19
  20. Mike

    bmoag Guest

    How many more "foiled plots" will be announced by the American Republican
    administration between now and congressional elections in November?
    Given the repetitive bald lies put out by the current American
    administration and its British lapdog do you really take at full face value
    ANY pronouncements these people make?
    According to a recent poll 50% of Americans think Iraq had weapons of mass
    destruction so I guess you can fool alot of the people alot of the time.
    The British government that foiled the latest plot is the British government
    that killed some poor Brazilian schnook in a subway and claimed they had
    blocked a terrorist plot.
    Grow up and realize the world you live in: nothing, absolutely nothing,
    should be taken at face value, particularly the pronouncements of
    governments and any information that comes from the corporate news media.
    It could be true, but chances are it is not.
     
    bmoag, Aug 10, 2006
    #20
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