camera with 20mm wide angle?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by peter, Apr 28, 2006.

  1. peter

    peter Guest

    What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle attachment that
    can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider? This would be used for
    shooting house interiors.

    I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front. This is
    because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get the widest
    view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this purpose.

    The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera like this.
     
    peter, Apr 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. "peter" <> wrote in message news:FRq4g.11$CY6.0@trnddc07...
    > What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle attachment
    > that can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider? This would be used for
    > shooting house interiors.
    >
    > I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front. This is
    > because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get the widest
    > view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this purpose.


    You can get just as close to the wall if you use an angle finder on a dSLR.
    (Although Canon's angle finders are expensive. I found the older
    non-magnifying version, and used it set me back US$70 or so. It is nicely
    made, though.)

    > The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera like
    > this.


    Nikon has a wide angle attachment that gets some of their cameras to 19mm
    equivalent.

    I think Ricoh has one that makes it to 21mm equiv.

    Either the Canon 10-22 or the off-brand 10-20 zoom on an APS-C dSLR would be
    wider and better image quality.

    The best tool for that job would, of course, be the Sigma 12-24 on the Canon
    5D.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Apr 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. peter

    Neil Ellwood Guest

    On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 01:38:20 +0900, David J. Littleboy wrote:

    >
    > "peter" <> wrote in message news:FRq4g.11$CY6.0@trnddc07...
    >> What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle attachment
    >> that can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider? This would be used for
    >> shooting house interiors.
    >>
    >> I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front. This is
    >> because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get the widest
    >> view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this purpose.

    >
    > You can get just as close to the wall if you use an angle finder on a dSLR.
    > (Although Canon's angle finders are expensive. I found the older
    > non-magnifying version, and used it set me back US$70 or so. It is nicely
    > made, though.)
    >
    >> The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera like
    >> this.

    >
    > Nikon has a wide angle attachment that gets some of their cameras to 19mm
    > equivalent.
    >
    > I think Ricoh has one that makes it to 21mm equiv.
    >
    > Either the Canon 10-22 or the off-brand 10-20 zoom on an APS-C dSLR would be
    > wider and better image quality.
    >
    > The best tool for that job would, of course, be the Sigma 12-24 on the Canon
    > 5D.
    >
    > David J. Littleboy
    > Tokyo, Japan

    There is also the old trick of shooting through an open doorway or a
    window.

    --
    Neil
    Delete 'l' to reply
     
    Neil Ellwood, Apr 28, 2006
    #3
  4. peter

    peter Guest

    "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote in message
    news:e2tgea$73b$...
    >
    > You can get just as close to the wall if you use an angle finder on a
    > dSLR. (Although Canon's angle finders are expensive. I found the older
    > non-magnifying version, and used it set me back US$70 or so. It is nicely
    > made, though.)


    That's an idea. Although I need a few inches for my head when I lean over to
    use the angle finder, so I can't bud the camera against the wall.

    > Nikon has a wide angle attachment that gets some of their cameras to 19mm
    > equivalent.


    Will investigate this route.

    > Either the Canon 10-22 or the off-brand 10-20 zoom on an APS-C dSLR would
    > be wider and better image quality.
    >
    > The best tool for that job would, of course, be the Sigma 12-24 on the
    > Canon 5D.


    When the 5D drops to $2000...

    It just occured to me the Olympus E330 is a D-SLR with a flip out preview
    LCD. Unfortunately the LCD cannot be seen from the front :(

    Thanks for the suggestions.
     
    peter, Apr 28, 2006
    #4
  5. peter

    Roy G Guest

    "peter" <> wrote in message news:FRq4g.11$CY6.0@trnddc07...
    > What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle attachment
    > that can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider? This would be used for
    > shooting house interiors.
    >
    > I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front. This is
    > because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get the widest
    > view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this purpose.
    >
    > The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera like
    > this.

    Hi.

    Do you really want to have your own photo included in every picture of a
    room.

    You will need rather long arms if you are going to be in front of a 20mm
    equiv lens, and not be in the picture when you press the shutter.

    Tripod against the wall and use a remote release.

    Roy G
     
    Roy G, Apr 28, 2006
    #5
  6. "peter" <> wrote:
    > "David J. Littleboy" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> You can get just as close to the wall if you use an angle finder on a
    >> dSLR. (Although Canon's angle finders are expensive. I found the older
    >> non-magnifying version, and used it set me back US$70 or so. It is nicely
    >> made, though.)

    >
    > That's an idea. Although I need a few inches for my head when I lean over
    > to use the angle finder, so I can't butt the camera against the wall.


    I find that by switching eyes I can get the camera nearly flush to the wall
    and still see what's happening. It's really very good. (Although you also
    need a place for your body, which might be a problem sometimes.)

    >> Nikon has a wide angle attachment that gets some of their cameras to 19mm
    >> equivalent.

    >
    > Will investigate this route.
    >
    >> Either the Canon 10-22 or the off-brand 10-20 zoom on an APS-C dSLR would
    >> be wider and better image quality.
    >>
    >> The best tool for that job would, of course, be the Sigma 12-24 on the
    >> Canon 5D.

    >
    > When the 5D drops to $2000...


    Just wait a couple of years. Maybe not even that: it's already around
    US$2700 with rebated.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Apr 29, 2006
    #6
  7. peter

    J. Clarke Guest

    Neil Ellwood wrote:

    > On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 01:38:20 +0900, David J. Littleboy wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "peter" <> wrote in message
    >> news:FRq4g.11$CY6.0@trnddc07...
    >>> What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle attachment
    >>> that can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider? This would be used
    >>> for shooting house interiors.
    >>>
    >>> I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front. This is
    >>> because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get the
    >>> widest view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this purpose.

    >>
    >> You can get just as close to the wall if you use an angle finder on a
    >> dSLR. (Although Canon's angle finders are expensive. I found the older
    >> non-magnifying version, and used it set me back US$70 or so. It is nicely
    >> made, though.)
    >>
    >>> The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera like
    >>> this.

    >>
    >> Nikon has a wide angle attachment that gets some of their cameras to 19mm
    >> equivalent.
    >>
    >> I think Ricoh has one that makes it to 21mm equiv.
    >>
    >> Either the Canon 10-22 or the off-brand 10-20 zoom on an APS-C dSLR would
    >> be wider and better image quality.
    >>
    >> The best tool for that job would, of course, be the Sigma 12-24 on the
    >> Canon 5D.
    >>
    >> David J. Littleboy
    >> Tokyo, Japan

    > There is also the old trick of shooting through an open doorway or a
    > window.


    Sounds like the OP is selling real estate, not fine art prints. Coolpix
    950, 990, or 995 using the WC-E63 wide angle attachment goes to about 24mm
    equivalent with good quality and the camera can be adjusted so that the LCD
    is on the _front_. There's also a fisheye (FC-E8) available that goes 8-24
    equivalent.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Apr 29, 2006
    #7
  8. peter

    Frank ess Guest

    J. Clarke wrote:
    > Neil Ellwood wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 01:38:20 +0900, David J. Littleboy wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "peter" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:FRq4g.11$CY6.0@trnddc07...
    >>>> What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle
    >>>> attachment that can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider?
    >>>> This
    >>>> would be used for shooting house interiors.
    >>>>
    >>>> I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front.
    >>>> This
    >>>> is because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get
    >>>> the widest view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this
    >>>> purpose.
    >>>
    >>> You can get just as close to the wall if you use an angle finder
    >>> on
    >>> a dSLR. (Although Canon's angle finders are expensive. I found the
    >>> older non-magnifying version, and used it set me back US$70 or so.
    >>> It is nicely made, though.)
    >>>
    >>>> The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera
    >>>> like this.
    >>>
    >>> Nikon has a wide angle attachment that gets some of their cameras
    >>> to 19mm equivalent.
    >>>
    >>> I think Ricoh has one that makes it to 21mm equiv.
    >>>
    >>> Either the Canon 10-22 or the off-brand 10-20 zoom on an APS-C
    >>> dSLR
    >>> would be wider and better image quality.
    >>>
    >>> The best tool for that job would, of course, be the Sigma 12-24 on
    >>> the Canon 5D.
    >>>
    >>> David J. Littleboy
    >>> Tokyo, Japan

    >> There is also the old trick of shooting through an open doorway or
    >> a
    >> window.

    >
    > Sounds like the OP is selling real estate, not fine art prints.
    > Coolpix 950, 990, or 995 using the WC-E63 wide angle attachment goes
    > to about 24mm equivalent with good quality and the camera can be
    > adjusted so that the LCD is on the _front_. There's also a fisheye
    > (FC-E8) available that goes 8-24 equivalent.


    Nikon CP5000 (far from current, but out there) with .68x Wide Angle
    Adapter goes to 19mm equiv, and makes nice 5MP pictures.
    http://static.flickr.com/45/129735574_ef7bc5883b_o.jpg

    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Apr 29, 2006
    #8
  9. peter

    DHB Guest

    On Fri, 28 Apr 2006 15:51:01 GMT, "peter" <> wrote:

    >What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle attachment that
    >can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider? This would be used for
    >shooting house interiors.


    Can't say for sure here because it's a bit like asking who
    makes the best sport's car for "you"? That would depend on a lot of
    things known only to "you", including "your" preferences.

    >I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front. This is
    >because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get the widest
    >view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this purpose.


    Don't know if your going to gain that much by being able to
    place the camera against the wall but if you feel this will work for
    you but you want a live LCD display from the camera to help you aim
    the camera just right, I have a suggestion that may be well worth your
    consideration.

    Most P&S camera provide a live LCD display option, some even
    have a swivel LCD like the Canon A610 & A620 that can be swung around
    so you can see a live LCD view from the front of the camera. However
    the 2" LCD may be too small for your needs in this situation. If
    that's the case here is a very simple solution to that problem:

    Connect the camera to a portable DVD player or LCD TV which
    has A/V inputs. The camera comes with the cable to connect it to a TV
    via the A/V output jack which most people only use to display their
    picture as a means of instantly sharing their pictures with other,
    such as @ a family event. However a TV, LCD or otherwise will also
    act as a *very large live LCD display*. If the camera has a wireless
    remote shutter release, that could be used also. If the camera of
    your choice dose not (A610/A620 does not), you can use the self timer
    which should give you enough time to get out of or get into the
    picture.

    It's just a thought because this way "you" get to select the
    size of the live picture display by what size monitor you connect it
    to. Also if being tethered to the camera is OK for your needs, you
    may want to consider wired remote control via the USB port & use of a
    notebook. Most Canon P&S cameras offer this feature including most of
    the Axxx line & even comes with the needed software but be advised
    that the "A610" dose *NOT* have this feature but it's higher
    resolution twin, the A620 *DOES*!

    Don't know if anything I offered helps you but I gave it my
    admittedly overly long 2 cents worth in the hopes that there is some
    value in this to you & or others.
    >
    >The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera like this.
    >


    You may want to check the A620 here:

    http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_reviews/a620.html

    You can check out a lot of other cameras here as well. A last
    note which works very well for me with Canon P&S cameras when taking
    indoor pictures of rooms with stationary objects, is to set it to Tv
    mode with a shutter speed to 1.3 seconds or longer & turn off the
    flash, manual WB usually helps too. The reason this works is because
    1.3 seconds or longer automatically activates "dark field noise
    reduction" which will make a big especially with P&S cameras. It's
    great for capturing the atmosphere/ambiance of a place with it's
    natural lighting.

    Respectfully, DHB


    "To announce that there must be no criticism of the President,
    or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong,
    is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable
    to the American public."--Theodore Roosevelt, May 7, 1918
     
    DHB, Apr 29, 2006
    #9
  10. peter

    J. Clarke Guest

    Frank ess wrote:

    > J. Clarke wrote:
    >> Neil Ellwood wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 01:38:20 +0900, David J. Littleboy wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "peter" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:FRq4g.11$CY6.0@trnddc07...
    >>>>> What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle
    >>>>> attachment that can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider?
    >>>>> This
    >>>>> would be used for shooting house interiors.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front.
    >>>>> This
    >>>>> is because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get
    >>>>> the widest view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this
    >>>>> purpose.
    >>>>
    >>>> You can get just as close to the wall if you use an angle finder
    >>>> on
    >>>> a dSLR. (Although Canon's angle finders are expensive. I found the
    >>>> older non-magnifying version, and used it set me back US$70 or so.
    >>>> It is nicely made, though.)
    >>>>
    >>>>> The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera
    >>>>> like this.
    >>>>
    >>>> Nikon has a wide angle attachment that gets some of their cameras
    >>>> to 19mm equivalent.
    >>>>
    >>>> I think Ricoh has one that makes it to 21mm equiv.
    >>>>
    >>>> Either the Canon 10-22 or the off-brand 10-20 zoom on an APS-C
    >>>> dSLR
    >>>> would be wider and better image quality.
    >>>>
    >>>> The best tool for that job would, of course, be the Sigma 12-24 on
    >>>> the Canon 5D.
    >>>>
    >>>> David J. Littleboy
    >>>> Tokyo, Japan
    >>> There is also the old trick of shooting through an open doorway or
    >>> a
    >>> window.

    >>
    >> Sounds like the OP is selling real estate, not fine art prints.
    >> Coolpix 950, 990, or 995 using the WC-E63 wide angle attachment goes
    >> to about 24mm equivalent with good quality and the camera can be
    >> adjusted so that the LCD is on the _front_. There's also a fisheye
    >> (FC-E8) available that goes 8-24 equivalent.

    >
    > Nikon CP5000 (far from current, but out there) with .68x Wide Angle
    > Adapter goes to 19mm equiv, and makes nice 5MP pictures.
    > http://static.flickr.com/45/129735574_ef7bc5883b_o.jpg


    Doesn't meet the requirement to be able to compose the shot with it pressed
    against a wall though. The S4 does that but it doesn't have a threaded
    adapter ring so using a wide-angle adapter is problematical. The 900 I've
    never actually heard of anybody having.

    Another option with many digital cameras is to use the video out and an
    auxiliary LCD to compose--the auxiliary LCD can be a video camera, a
    portable DVD player, a handheld TV, VR glasses, or a laptop among other
    options. Relatively clumsy solution though.

    The Olympus E-330 would be another option--it allows the LCD to be used as a
    waist-level finder--can't compose from the front but can from the top, and
    there are several lenses that span the 20mm range. It also allows the use
    of an auxiliary display.

    The Canon EOS D20a (note the "a"--it's not the same as the regular D20)
    should also allow the use of a video monitor for preview--I haven't been
    able to find any categoric statement to that effect. The same should be
    true of the coming Panasonic DMC-L1, which shares a lot of technology with
    the E-330. Neither of these, however, has a tilt-out LCD.

    A (much) more expensive option would be a medium format (most of which have
    waist-level finders) and a digital back.

    One could also rig something with duct tape and a mirror, but I suspect that
    that would reflect badly on one's image.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Apr 29, 2006
    #10
  11. peter

    m Ransley Guest

    There is a new 5mp P&S Kodak out with 2 lenses, it might go to 24mm. it
    has a built in 180 degree panarama stitching mode, it is cheap and worth
    checking out.
     
    m Ransley, Apr 29, 2006
    #11
  12. peter

    Paul Rubin Guest

    "J. Clarke" <> writes:
    > One could also rig something with duct tape and a mirror, but I suspect that
    > that would reflect badly on one's image.


    Another possibility (not too crazy with an ultrawide, for a static
    subject like a RE interior) is to just aim without using the
    viewfinder or screen, then check the shot on the LCD, and try again if
    needed.
     
    Paul Rubin, Apr 29, 2006
    #12
  13. peter

    Guest

    David J. Littleboy wrote:
    > "peter" <> wrote:
    > > That's an idea. Although I need a few inches for my head when I lean over
    > > to use the angle finder, so I can't butt the camera against the wall.

    >
    > I find that by switching eyes I can get the camera nearly flush to the wall
    > and still see what's happening. It's really very good. (Although you also
    > need a place for your body, which might be a problem sometimes.)


    Are you guys using tripods? Because with a reasonable size
    tripod, the legs are going to limit how close you can get the
    camera to the wall anyway. (Unless you use a magic-arm
    type attachment, which will probably get in the picture with
    a 20mm lens). And without a tripod, I don't see how one
    could realistically use the flip out VF for framing while standing
    in front of the camera. Unless you pointed it up to reinvent
    the waist-level finder, I guess; in which case the angle finder
    attachment ought to work as well.
     
    , Apr 29, 2006
    #13
  14. peter

    Rich Guest

    On Fri, 28 Apr 2006 19:58:11 -0700, "Frank ess" <>
    wrote:

    >J. Clarke wrote:
    >> Neil Ellwood wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 01:38:20 +0900, David J. Littleboy wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "peter" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:FRq4g.11$CY6.0@trnddc07...
    >>>>> What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle
    >>>>> attachment that can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider?
    >>>>> This
    >>>>> would be used for shooting house interiors.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front.
    >>>>> This
    >>>>> is because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get
    >>>>> the widest view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this
    >>>>> purpose.
    >>>>
    >>>> You can get just as close to the wall if you use an angle finder
    >>>> on
    >>>> a dSLR. (Although Canon's angle finders are expensive. I found the
    >>>> older non-magnifying version, and used it set me back US$70 or so.
    >>>> It is nicely made, though.)
    >>>>
    >>>>> The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera
    >>>>> like this.
    >>>>
    >>>> Nikon has a wide angle attachment that gets some of their cameras
    >>>> to 19mm equivalent.
    >>>>
    >>>> I think Ricoh has one that makes it to 21mm equiv.
    >>>>
    >>>> Either the Canon 10-22 or the off-brand 10-20 zoom on an APS-C
    >>>> dSLR
    >>>> would be wider and better image quality.
    >>>>
    >>>> The best tool for that job would, of course, be the Sigma 12-24 on
    >>>> the Canon 5D.
    >>>>
    >>>> David J. Littleboy
    >>>> Tokyo, Japan
    >>> There is also the old trick of shooting through an open doorway or
    >>> a
    >>> window.

    >>
    >> Sounds like the OP is selling real estate, not fine art prints.
    >> Coolpix 950, 990, or 995 using the WC-E63 wide angle attachment goes
    >> to about 24mm equivalent with good quality and the camera can be
    >> adjusted so that the LCD is on the _front_. There's also a fisheye
    >> (FC-E8) available that goes 8-24 equivalent.

    >
    >Nikon CP5000 (far from current, but out there) with .68x Wide Angle
    >Adapter goes to 19mm equiv, and makes nice 5MP pictures.
    >http://static.flickr.com/45/129735574_ef7bc5883b_o.jpg


    And great DOF too.
    -Rich
     
    Rich, Apr 29, 2006
    #14
  15. peter

    Rich Guest

    On Fri, 28 Apr 2006 15:51:01 GMT, "peter" <> wrote:

    >What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle attachment that
    >can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider? This would be used for
    >shooting house interiors.
    >
    >I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front. This is
    >because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get the widest
    >view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this purpose.
    >
    >The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera like this.
    >


    Do panorama shots.
     
    Rich, Apr 29, 2006
    #15
  16. peter

    J. Clarke Guest

    Rich wrote:

    > On Fri, 28 Apr 2006 19:58:11 -0700, "Frank ess" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>J. Clarke wrote:
    >>> Neil Ellwood wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 01:38:20 +0900, David J. Littleboy wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "peter" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:FRq4g.11$CY6.0@trnddc07...
    >>>>>> What is currently the best non DSLR camera with a wide angle
    >>>>>> attachment that can get the equivalent of 20mm lens or wider?
    >>>>>> This
    >>>>>> would be used for shooting house interiors.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I also like to be able to see the preview LCD from the front.
    >>>>>> This
    >>>>>> is because I want to shoot with the camera against a wall (to get
    >>>>>> the widest view). And this is why a DSLR is not good for this
    >>>>>> purpose.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> You can get just as close to the wall if you use an angle finder
    >>>>> on
    >>>>> a dSLR. (Although Canon's angle finders are expensive. I found the
    >>>>> older non-magnifying version, and used it set me back US$70 or so.
    >>>>> It is nicely made, though.)
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> The buying guide at dpreview is no help in screening for a camera
    >>>>>> like this.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Nikon has a wide angle attachment that gets some of their cameras
    >>>>> to 19mm equivalent.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I think Ricoh has one that makes it to 21mm equiv.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Either the Canon 10-22 or the off-brand 10-20 zoom on an APS-C
    >>>>> dSLR
    >>>>> would be wider and better image quality.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The best tool for that job would, of course, be the Sigma 12-24 on
    >>>>> the Canon 5D.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> David J. Littleboy
    >>>>> Tokyo, Japan
    >>>> There is also the old trick of shooting through an open doorway or
    >>>> a
    >>>> window.
    >>>
    >>> Sounds like the OP is selling real estate, not fine art prints.
    >>> Coolpix 950, 990, or 995 using the WC-E63 wide angle attachment goes
    >>> to about 24mm equivalent with good quality and the camera can be
    >>> adjusted so that the LCD is on the _front_. There's also a fisheye
    >>> (FC-E8) available that goes 8-24 equivalent.

    >>
    >>Nikon CP5000 (far from current, but out there) with .68x Wide Angle
    >>Adapter goes to 19mm equiv, and makes nice 5MP pictures.
    >>http://static.flickr.com/45/129735574_ef7bc5883b_o.jpg

    >
    > And great DOF too.


    I wouldn't expect depth of field to be an issue with a 20mm lens.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Apr 29, 2006
    #16
  17. peter

    J. Clarke Guest

    wrote:

    > David J. Littleboy wrote:
    >> "peter" <> wrote:
    >> > That's an idea. Although I need a few inches for my head when I lean
    >> > over to use the angle finder, so I can't butt the camera against the
    >> > wall.

    >>
    >> I find that by switching eyes I can get the camera nearly flush to the
    >> wall and still see what's happening. It's really very good. (Although you
    >> also need a place for your body, which might be a problem sometimes.)

    >
    > Are you guys using tripods? Because with a reasonable size
    > tripod, the legs are going to limit how close you can get the
    > camera to the wall anyway. (Unless you use a magic-arm
    > type attachment, which will probably get in the picture with
    > a 20mm lens). And without a tripod, I don't see how one
    > could realistically use the flip out VF for framing while standing
    > in front of the camera. Unless you pointed it up to reinvent
    > the waist-level finder, I guess; in which case the angle finder
    > attachment ought to work as well.


    The wall is the brace--press it against the wall, compose, move head out of
    way, shoot. The Coolpix 990 seems like it was designed with this in mind.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Apr 29, 2006
    #17
  18. peter

    Peter Guest

    wrote:
    >
    > Are you guys using tripods? Because with a reasonable size
    > tripod, the legs are going to limit how close you can get the
    > camera to the wall anyway.


    A tabletop tripod held against the wall can be very useful.
    The Leitz/Minolta type is probably the best. I use a
    Manfrotto which works well for me. With a wide angle
    lens it sometimes is a bit tricky to make sure that no
    part of your body gets in the picture.

    Peter.
    --
     
    Peter, Apr 30, 2006
    #18
  19. peter

    peter Guest

    "J. Clarke" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Neil Ellwood wrote:
    >
    > Sounds like the OP is selling real estate, not fine art prints. Coolpix
    > 950, 990, or 995 using the WC-E63 wide angle attachment goes to about 24mm
    > equivalent with good quality and the camera can be adjusted so that the
    > LCD
    > is on the _front_. There's also a fisheye (FC-E8) available that goes
    > 8-24
    > equivalent.



    Yup, I want to take photos for real estate agents.
    coolpix 990 + WC-E63 is exactly my current setup

    I'm not satisfied with it, mainly because it's still not wide enough. It
    also has too much noise, stuck pixels, barrel distortion, and chromatic
    aberration. Fortunately most can be taken out with photoshop.

    Hard to believe this 6-year old dcam is the best setup I have. The FC-E8 is
    still selling for > $90 on ebay; I'm not sure it's wise to keep investing in
    this system.
     
    peter, Apr 30, 2006
    #19
  20. peter

    peter Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Are you guys using tripods? Because with a reasonable size
    > tripod, the legs are going to limit how close you can get the
    > camera to the wall anyway. (Unless you use a magic-arm
    > type attachment, which will probably get in the picture with
    > a 20mm lens). And without a tripod, I don't see how one
    > could realistically use the flip out VF for framing while standing
    > in front of the camera. Unless you pointed it up to reinvent
    > the waist-level finder, I guess; in which case the angle finder
    > attachment ought to work as well.


    I use a tripod and pull in all the legs so it works like a monopod. I press
    the tripod and the camera against a room corner and I curl up next to it to
    shoot. The camera is 2-3 inches away from the wall corner.

    With a 24mm equivalent lens, it's not too hard to hide myself next to the
    camera. Don't have 20mm yet. It may require more contortion.
     
    peter, Apr 30, 2006
    #20
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