Camera Recommendations Requested

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by HerHusband, Aug 9, 2009.

  1. HerHusband

    HerHusband Guest

    We just returned from a week long vacation, in which we discovered some
    of the weaknesses of our present digi-cam. So, I'm starting a search for
    a new camera and thought I'd ask for some recommendations. Here are some
    of my requirements:

    - UNDER $500

    - Uses SDHC memory cards. Our current Fuji F10 uses XD cards. When we
    filled up the cards we had brought, the extra 5 SDHC cards I had for my
    camcorder were of no use. So, I'd like to be able to use the same memory
    cards in both devices.

    - FASTEST power up. My wife often missed shots of wildlife or passing
    scenery, because the subject was already gone by the time the camera
    turned on.

    - FASTEST picture taking/saving. Even when our camera was already on,
    the delay in taking the picture was too slow, and having to wait while
    the first picture was being saved often meant the subject was gone before
    we could take a second picture.

    - Simple automatic operations. We're not photographers, we just like to
    capture special family moments, vacations, etc. We have no need for the
    manual controls (or cost) of a DSLR. We don't need lots of fancy
    features, just good quality photos.

    - Compact. We need something fairly small that's easy to take on
    vacations, hikes, etc.

    - GREAT quality. We don't necessarily need a bazillion megapixels. Our
    Fuji F10 is only 6MP and is fine for our purposes. But the image quality
    of my camcorder far exceeds the F10's quality with just a 1920x1080
    resolution. So obviously there's more to quality than massive megapixels.
    I'm not against higher resolutions, but I'm more concerned with image
    quality.

    - GOOD ZOOM. My wife's most common complaint is not being able to zoom in
    close enough to see a bird, chipmunk, or whatever. So, I want something
    with at least 5X optical zoom, preferably more, though I don't want to
    lose too much wide angle view either.

    Any recommendations???

    Thanks,

    Anthony
    HerHusband, Aug 9, 2009
    #1
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  2. HerHusband

    Irwell Guest

    On Sun, 9 Aug 2009 16:34:02 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband wrote:

    > We just returned from a week long vacation, in which we discovered some
    > of the weaknesses of our present digi-cam. So, I'm starting a search for
    > a new camera and thought I'd ask for some recommendations. Here are some
    > of my requirements:
    >
    > - UNDER $500
    >
    > - Uses SDHC memory cards. Our current Fuji F10 uses XD cards. When we
    > filled up the cards we had brought, the extra 5 SDHC cards I had for my
    > camcorder were of no use. So, I'd like to be able to use the same memory
    > cards in both devices.
    >
    > - FASTEST power up. My wife often missed shots of wildlife or passing
    > scenery, because the subject was already gone by the time the camera
    > turned on.
    >
    > - FASTEST picture taking/saving. Even when our camera was already on,
    > the delay in taking the picture was too slow, and having to wait while
    > the first picture was being saved often meant the subject was gone before
    > we could take a second picture.
    >
    > - Simple automatic operations. We're not photographers, we just like to
    > capture special family moments, vacations, etc. We have no need for the
    > manual controls (or cost) of a DSLR. We don't need lots of fancy
    > features, just good quality photos.
    >
    > - Compact. We need something fairly small that's easy to take on
    > vacations, hikes, etc.
    >
    > - GREAT quality. We don't necessarily need a bazillion megapixels. Our
    > Fuji F10 is only 6MP and is fine for our purposes. But the image quality
    > of my camcorder far exceeds the F10's quality with just a 1920x1080
    > resolution. So obviously there's more to quality than massive megapixels.
    > I'm not against higher resolutions, but I'm more concerned with image
    > quality.
    >
    > - GOOD ZOOM. My wife's most common complaint is not being able to zoom in
    > close enough to see a bird, chipmunk, or whatever. So, I want something
    > with at least 5X optical zoom, preferably more, though I don't want to
    > lose too much wide angle view either.
    >
    > Any recommendations???
    >

    Try entering your criteria on this page
    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/compare.asp

    You will be able to make a selection then
    Irwell, Aug 9, 2009
    #2
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  3. HerHusband

    HerHusband Guest

    HerHusband, Aug 9, 2009
    #3
  4. HerHusband

    Fotoguy Guest

    On Sun, 09 Aug 2009 16:34:02 +0000, HerHusband wrote:

    > We just returned from a week long vacation, in which we discovered some
    > of the weaknesses of our present digi-cam. So, I'm starting a search for
    > a new camera and thought I'd ask for some recommendations. Here are
    > some of my requirements:
    >
    > - UNDER $500
    >
    > - Uses SDHC memory cards. Our current Fuji F10 uses XD cards. When we
    > filled up the cards we had brought, the extra 5 SDHC cards I had for my
    > camcorder were of no use. So, I'd like to be able to use the same memory
    > cards in both devices.
    >
    > - FASTEST power up.
    >
    > [big snip]
    >
    > Any recommendations???


    Take a look at the Canon Powershot SX-200 IS. It meets all your
    requirements. And is well under $500.

    There are a couple of other cameras that might do as well, but I've
    always been impressed with the overall build and image quality of Canon
    point-n-shoots. And, their reasonable prices. So, I chose the Canon
    over the others. Although, that doesn't make the others "bad" choices.

    If you want to do your own search, click on the Best In Class link in my
    signature below. The site is designed for people who don't know a lot
    about photography or cameras, but do know what kind of pictures they want
    to take. Searches are criteria-based instead of camera feature-based.


    --
    Fotoguy
    BestInClass.com
    "Personalized digital camera recommendations"
    http://www.bestinclass.com/digital-cameras
    Fotoguy, Aug 9, 2009
    #4
  5. HerHusband <> wrote:

    > We just returned from a week long vacation, in which we discovered some
    > of the weaknesses of our present digi-cam. So, I'm starting a search for
    > a new camera and thought I'd ask for some recommendations. Here are some
    > of my requirements:
    >
    > - UNDER $500
    >
    > - Uses SDHC memory cards. Our current Fuji F10 uses XD cards. When we
    > filled up the cards we had brought, the extra 5 SDHC cards I had for my
    > camcorder were of no use. So, I'd like to be able to use the same memory
    > cards in both devices.


    Anything modern that takes SD cards should also take SDHC. Say, less than 3
    years old or thereabouts.

    > - FASTEST picture taking/saving. Even when our camera was already on,
    > the delay in taking the picture was too slow, and having to wait while
    > the first picture was being saved often meant the subject was gone before
    > we could take a second picture.


    Preset focus (infinity or hyperfocal distance) might help here, or phase
    detection focus (normally only found on DSLRs though). Other than that you
    need to look at some review sites for power-on-to-first-shot timings.

    > - Compact. We need something fairly small that's easy to take on
    > vacations, hikes, etc.
    >
    > - GOOD ZOOM. My wife's most common complaint is not being able to zoom in
    > close enough to see a bird, chipmunk, or whatever. So, I want something
    > with at least 5X optical zoom, preferably more, though I don't want to
    > lose too much wide angle view either.


    You could look at the Ricoh R-series or their high dynamic range successor
    the CX. They all have 28-200mm equivalent zoom in a very compact body with
    options to preset the focus to infinity, hyperfocal distance or manual. The
    lenses are good, though received wisdom is that the newest models such as
    R10 have worse picture quality due to stuffing too many megapixel into the
    same size sensor, so you might want to look for R9 or earlier if still
    available.

    Some of the Panasonics offer a bigger zoom range in a slightly larger body
    but tend not to offer any control over things like focus. Personally after
    experiencing frustration with failure to focus on things like clouds with
    an all-auto panasonic camera I would not buy anything which didn't at least
    let me preset infinity focus to avoid frustration with skyscapes and
    distant landscapes or taking pictures through glass. Sometimes "scenic" or
    "landscape" mode sets infinity focus for you (my Nikon does that), but not
    in the case of Panasonics IME.
    Marty Freeman, Aug 9, 2009
    #5
  6. HerHusband

    ray Guest

    On Sun, 09 Aug 2009 16:34:02 +0000, HerHusband wrote:

    > We just returned from a week long vacation, in which we discovered some
    > of the weaknesses of our present digi-cam. So, I'm starting a search for
    > a new camera and thought I'd ask for some recommendations. Here are
    > some of my requirements:
    >
    > - UNDER $500
    >
    > - Uses SDHC memory cards. Our current Fuji F10 uses XD cards. When we
    > filled up the cards we had brought, the extra 5 SDHC cards I had for my
    > camcorder were of no use. So, I'd like to be able to use the same memory
    > cards in both devices.
    >
    > - FASTEST power up. My wife often missed shots of wildlife or passing
    > scenery, because the subject was already gone by the time the camera
    > turned on.
    >
    > - FASTEST picture taking/saving. Even when our camera was already on,
    > the delay in taking the picture was too slow, and having to wait while
    > the first picture was being saved often meant the subject was gone
    > before we could take a second picture.
    >
    > - Simple automatic operations. We're not photographers, we just like to
    > capture special family moments, vacations, etc. We have no need for the
    > manual controls (or cost) of a DSLR. We don't need lots of fancy
    > features, just good quality photos.
    >
    > - Compact. We need something fairly small that's easy to take on
    > vacations, hikes, etc.
    >
    > - GREAT quality. We don't necessarily need a bazillion megapixels. Our
    > Fuji F10 is only 6MP and is fine for our purposes. But the image quality
    > of my camcorder far exceeds the F10's quality with just a 1920x1080
    > resolution. So obviously there's more to quality than massive
    > megapixels. I'm not against higher resolutions, but I'm more concerned
    > with image quality.
    >
    > - GOOD ZOOM. My wife's most common complaint is not being able to zoom
    > in close enough to see a bird, chipmunk, or whatever. So, I want
    > something with at least 5X optical zoom, preferably more, though I don't
    > want to lose too much wide angle view either.
    >
    > Any recommendations???


    How about film?


    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Anthony
    ray, Aug 10, 2009
    #6
  7. HerHusband

    Shawn Hirn Guest

    In article <Xns9C625FF3D371herhusband@188.40.43.213>,
    HerHusband <> wrote:

    > We just returned from a week long vacation, in which we discovered some
    > of the weaknesses of our present digi-cam. So, I'm starting a search for
    > a new camera and thought I'd ask for some recommendations. Here are some
    > of my requirements:
    >
    > - UNDER $500
    >
    > - Uses SDHC memory cards. Our current Fuji F10 uses XD cards. When we
    > filled up the cards we had brought, the extra 5 SDHC cards I had for my
    > camcorder were of no use. So, I'd like to be able to use the same memory
    > cards in both devices.
    >
    > - FASTEST power up. My wife often missed shots of wildlife or passing
    > scenery, because the subject was already gone by the time the camera
    > turned on.
    >
    > - FASTEST picture taking/saving. Even when our camera was already on,
    > the delay in taking the picture was too slow, and having to wait while
    > the first picture was being saved often meant the subject was gone before
    > we could take a second picture.
    >
    > - Simple automatic operations. We're not photographers, we just like to
    > capture special family moments, vacations, etc. We have no need for the
    > manual controls (or cost) of a DSLR. We don't need lots of fancy
    > features, just good quality photos.
    >
    > - Compact. We need something fairly small that's easy to take on
    > vacations, hikes, etc.
    >
    > - GREAT quality. We don't necessarily need a bazillion megapixels. Our
    > Fuji F10 is only 6MP and is fine for our purposes. But the image quality
    > of my camcorder far exceeds the F10's quality with just a 1920x1080
    > resolution. So obviously there's more to quality than massive megapixels.
    > I'm not against higher resolutions, but I'm more concerned with image
    > quality.
    >
    > - GOOD ZOOM. My wife's most common complaint is not being able to zoom in
    > close enough to see a bird, chipmunk, or whatever. So, I want something
    > with at least 5X optical zoom, preferably more, though I don't want to
    > lose too much wide angle view either.
    >
    > Any recommendations???


    Yup. Take a look at http://www.dpreview.com for tons of camera reviews.
    Shawn Hirn, Aug 10, 2009
    #7
  8. HerHusband

    HerHusband Guest

    Ray,

    > How about film?


    Nope, been there, done that... :)

    We took over 2250 photos on our week long vacation (between three cameras),
    and kept about 1700 of those after weeding out similar photos, blurred,
    pictures with posts or other objects in the way, etc. It's simply not cost
    effective or convenient to use that much film and wait to get it developed.
    Not to mention the instant feedback of digital to see whether you caught
    that bird in the frame, or whether you need to reshoot.

    We've gone all digital for both stills and video and won't be going back to
    film...

    Thanks,

    Anthony
    HerHusband, Aug 10, 2009
    #8
  9. HerHusband

    ASAAR Guest

    On Sun, 9 Aug 2009 16:34:02 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband wrote:

    > We just returned from a week long vacation, in which we discovered some
    > of the weaknesses of our present digi-cam. So, I'm starting a search for
    > a new camera and thought I'd ask for some recommendations. Here are some
    > of my requirements:
    >
    > - UNDER $500


    Fuji's S100fs has just been discontinued. You can still find them
    new but prices vary quite a bit from dealer to dealer and from day
    to day. As an example, about two weeks ago J&R was selling the USA
    version for $599 and a day or two later the price dropped to $550.
    As I type this the price remains $550 ($549.88) but now they've
    added to the description "Limited quantity available...while
    supplies last". Also shown is a *very* nice, well padded leather
    bag for the S100fs for $27. It includes a full copy of Paint Shop
    Pro X2 which is the current version and which normally sells for
    several times that price, alone. B&H sells the same case and
    software for $50, but their version also includes a two year
    warranty extension from Fuji. Another camera store (TriState)
    claimed to have the USA version (I highly doubt that they ever did)
    for $520 and the imported S100fs for $479 two weeks ago, but a few
    days later claimed to run out of USA versions and raised the price
    of the imported version to $590. The price has now dropped back
    down to $520.

    The only problem with the Paint Shop Pro software is that its
    support for RAW files is limited to a small number of old camera
    models. For instance, the most recent supported Fuji model, IIRC,
    is the S7000 and maybe the old S5000/S5500. For Nikons it's the
    D200. I don't think that the Paint Shop Pro Ultimate X2 upgrade
    really adds much other than RAW support for many recent models
    (D300, D700, S100fs, etc.), and it's an additional $60 or so to
    upgrade. If you need RAW support you may prefer going for Photoshop
    Elements instead, but PSPro X2 is a good program and it includes
    Lynda.com's video training software on DVD which helps beginners
    come up to speed pretty quickly. Fuji's own software, by the way,
    offers RAW support for he S100fs, but it's pretty poor and *very*
    slow. Best avoided.


    > - Uses SDHC memory cards. Our current Fuji F10 uses XD cards. When we
    > filled up the cards we had brought, the extra 5 SDHC cards I had for my
    > camcorder were of no use. So, I'd like to be able to use the same memory
    > cards in both devices.


    The S100fs uses xD, SD and SDHC cards. Unlike many previous Fujis,
    SD performance is pretty good.


    > - FASTEST power up. My wife often missed shots of wildlife or passing
    > scenery, because the subject was already gone by the time the camera
    > turned on.


    It's not as quick as DSLRs, but not too bad - 2.0 seconds from
    power on to ready to shoot.


    > - FASTEST picture taking/saving. Even when our camera was already on,
    > the delay in taking the picture was too slow, and having to wait while
    > the first picture was being saved often meant the subject was gone before
    > we could take a second picture.


    How slow was your camera's "slow"? Again, not lightning fast
    (thinking of Nikon's D300, which is *far* faster than the S100fs),
    but it's able to take up to 5 consecutive shots (either JPG or RAW)
    at the rate of one shot per second in single shot mode, after which
    its internal memory buffer is full and if you keep shooting, it's
    quite a bit slower, maybe 2 or 3 seconds per shot - even slower if
    you're using slow memory cards. In continuous mode given a fast
    enough memory card, it'll shoot at 1 shot per second until the card
    is full. There are a couple of traditional Fuji "high speed"
    continuous shooting modes. Top 7 shoots up to 7 frames at about 3
    frames per second. Last 7 keeps shooting at 3 frames per second, but
    only retains (up to) the last 7 shots you took. For RAW files the
    same 3 shots per second frame rate applies, but it's called Top 3
    and Last 3 for obvious reasons. There's also a Top 50 mode that
    shoots at the rate of 7 frames per second for up to 50 shots, but
    these shots are recorded at 3mp instead of the camera's normal 11mp.


    > - Simple automatic operations. We're not photographers, we just like to
    > capture special family moments, vacations, etc. We have no need for the
    > manual controls (or cost) of a DSLR. We don't need lots of fancy
    > features, just good quality photos.


    The S100fs has all of the usual manual controls but they don't have
    to be used if you set the shooting mode dial to Auto or use any of
    the scene modes, which include several Landscape and Portrait modes,
    Baby mode, Night mode, Sunset, Beach, Snow, Sports and Fireworks
    modes.


    > - Compact. We need something fairly small that's easy to take on
    > vacations, hikes, etc.


    Too bad you didn't mention this earlier, as this camera probably
    isn't for you. It's as large as some of the smallest DSLRs. Many
    small men and petite women have no problem carrying it all day on
    vacations and hikes and a smaller camera would be more convenient,
    but that would lose the S100fs's better performance and image
    quality. Its lens, BTW, has a 35mm equiv. range of 28mm-400mm, and
    28mm is wider than you get with most P&S cameras, quite good for
    landscapes and indoor shooting.


    > - GREAT quality. We don't necessarily need a bazillion megapixels. Our
    > Fuji F10 is only 6MP and is fine for our purposes. But the image quality
    > of my camcorder far exceeds the F10's quality with just a 1920x1080
    > resolution. So obviously there's more to quality than massive megapixels.
    > I'm not against higher resolutions, but I'm more concerned with image
    > quality.


    Nope. Almost any 3mp, 4mp, 5mp and 6mp camera will take higher
    quality shots than your camcorder. 1920 x 1080 is only 2mp, but
    because the image is moving, it may appear to have more resolution.
    If you extract a still image from your camcorder's video, it won't
    look as good as your F10's images unless there's something
    drastically wrong with your F10 or your camcorder is very unusual
    and extremely expensive. You may want to take a look at some S100fs
    images. One photographer recently bought the camera and these
    pictures are from his first and second model shoots with it :


    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1000&message=32610662

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1012&message=32627411

    and from other photographers,

    Birds :

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1000&message=30298983

    Butterflies :

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1012&message=31197435

    A wedding (by an S100fs newbie) :

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1012&message=29561679&changemode=1



    > - GOOD ZOOM. My wife's most common complaint is not being able to zoom in
    > close enough to see a bird, chipmunk, or whatever. So, I want something
    > with at least 5X optical zoom, preferably more, though I don't want to
    > lose too much wide angle view either.


    The S100fs has a 14.3x zoom lens (28mm - 400mm), as good or better
    than you asked for, wider than usual and the zoom range is much more
    than 5x. In addition, the zoom is much faster to operate and more
    precise than most P&S cameras, since it is zoomed manually (like a
    DSLR) by rotating the lens's zoom ring instead of using a rocker,
    button or lever on the camera body.


    > Any recommendations???


    Yes. If you're at all tempted by the S100fs despite its size,
    don't consider the S200EXR, its replacement which will be available
    in a month or two or three. It uses the same lens, but it has a
    slightly smaller sensor, which gives the lens a wide focal length of
    only 30.5mm instead of 28mm, and it doesn't have the S100fs's
    articulating LCD display, which can be invaluable for several types
    of shooting. If you want to see what it looks like, here's a link to
    DPReview's extensive review. It's fairly long (19 pages) and highly
    technical in spots. Much of the review can be skipped. After seeing
    the spec's and what it looks like on the first two pages, you can
    skip to page 18 to read the Pros, Cons and conclusions.

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilms100fs/
    ASAAR, Aug 10, 2009
    #9
  10. "HerHusband" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9C625FF3D371herhusband@188.40.43.213...
    > We just returned from a week long vacation, in which we discovered some
    > of the weaknesses of our present digi-cam. So, I'm starting a search for
    > a new camera and thought I'd ask for some recommendations. Here are
    > some
    > of my requirements:

    []
    > - GOOD ZOOM. My wife's most common complaint is not being able to zoom
    > in
    > close enough to see a bird, chipmunk, or whatever. So, I want something
    > with at least 5X optical zoom, preferably more, though I don't want to
    > lose too much wide angle view either.
    >
    > Any recommendations???
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Anthony


    Anthony,

    We've used the Panasonic TZ3 for some time and been pleased with it.
    28-280 mm zoom, SD cards, compact, movies.
    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonictz3/

    Their current model has 12:1 zoom (25-300 mm):
    http://www.dpreview.com/news/0901/09012706panasonictz7.asp

    When using long zoom cameras like these, having Optical Image
    Stabilisation such as that on the Panasonic models is a great aid to
    taking sharp telephoto shots hand-held. 25-28 mm wide angle is quite
    respectable too.

    Cheers,
    David
    David J Taylor, Aug 10, 2009
    #10
  11. HerHusband

    HerHusband Guest

    > Fuji's S100fs has just been discontinued.

    Thanks for the recommendation, but that's a little bulkier than I'm hoping
    for, and bit pricier as well.

    > It's not as quick as DSLRs, but not too bad - 2.0 seconds from
    > power on to ready to shoot.


    That's about what our Fuji F10 does. It sounds fairly quick, but when
    you're trying to capture wildlife you just happened upon that feels like an
    eternity. And when we're on a road trip we may go an hour or more between
    shots, so leaving the camera on all the time is not an option.

    The upcoming Nikon S640 claims a .07 second startup, so that one is
    attracting my attention at this point. Will have to wait and read some
    reviews when they come out...

    > includes a full copy of Paint Shop Pro X2


    I have an older PSP version 4 which I love using, but the X2 version is way
    too slow and bulky for my tastes.

    > Nope. Almost any 3mp, 4mp, 5mp and 6mp camera will take higher
    > quality shots than your camcorder. 1920 x 1080 is only 2mp, but
    > because the image is moving, it may appear to have more resolution.
    > If you extract a still image from your camcorder's video, it won't
    > look as good as your F10's images


    Well, this isn't a perfect comparison, but it's a subject I knew all three
    of us took pictures of on our trip.

    1. This is a shot from my daughters Olympus FE190 camera (6MP). It's a
    little pixelated because I can't convince her to turn off the stupid
    digital zoom, but the important thing is the bland nature of the image. The
    colors are just weak, no real detail in the trees, and a little too much
    sharpening (though that could be due to the digital zoom).

    http://www.mountain-software.com/camera/olympus_fe190.jpg

    2. This is a similar shot from my wife's Fuji F10 camera (6MP). Slightly
    better detail, though a bit "grainy" in places. But the same bland colors,
    and a bit of a "haze" or blue tint in many images.

    http://www.mountain-software.com/camera/fuji_f10.jpg

    3. And here's a frame grab from my Canon HF100 camcorder (1920x1080). While
    having less physical resolution than the still cameras, the HF100 still
    shows more detail and the color looks MUCH more accurate (having been there
    to see what it actually looked like). In fact, the HF100 image isn't even
    as sharp as it could have been because I'm partially zooming through a low
    end wide angle lens I had on the camera.

    http://www.mountain-software.com/camera/canon_hf100.jpg

    Like I said, additional resolution would be great, but the color and detail
    quality is much more important to me.

    Thanks,

    Anthony
    HerHusband, Aug 10, 2009
    #11
  12. HerHusband

    SMS Guest

    HerHusband wrote:

    <snip>

    > Any recommendations???


    The Canon G10 comes closest to what you want. $469 from Adorama.

    You'll never get the start-up and lag times you had with film unless you
    go to a digital SLR, but the G10 will be okay.

    Good features
    -------------
    5x zoom
    Wide Angle
    Flash Shoe
    Optical Viewfinder
    Li-Ion battery

    See "http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_g10-review/"

    As he notes, Canon has decontented the G series, by going to a slower
    (though longer range) lens, and eliminating the tilt/swivel LCD (which
    was a great feature).

    The problem you have with cameras such as you describe is that the
    market is moving in both directions away from those types of cameras.
    Those who want pocket size aren't buying them because they're too big.
    Those that want the best image quality and shortest lag are buying
    D-SLRs that have larger sensors, less noise, faster response time, and
    better lenses.

    If you go to a super zoom, you're already at the size of a D-SLR without
    all the benefits.
    SMS, Aug 10, 2009
    #12
  13. HerHusband

    SMS Guest

    HerHusband wrote:

    > Any recommendations???


    Go to "http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/cameraList.php".

    Select: Fixed Lens, 3x-5x, and tick Image Stabilizer, Wide Angle Lens,
    Optical/Electronic Viewfinder.

    You have two choices. Canon G10 and Nikon P6000. Get the G10.

    The super zooms are too big for what you want.

    There used to be more choices in this category, but these cameras are
    "enthusiast" cameras, and most enthusiasts moved to D-SLRs, hence the
    sparse selection.
    SMS, Aug 10, 2009
    #13
  14. HerHusband

    SMS Guest

    SMS wrote:
    > HerHusband wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> Any recommendations???

    >
    > The Canon G10 comes closest to what you want. $469 from Adorama.
    >
    > You'll never get the start-up and lag times you had with film unless you
    > go to a digital SLR, but the G10 will be okay.
    >
    > Good features
    > -------------
    > 5x zoom
    > Wide Angle
    > Flash Shoe
    > Optical Viewfinder
    > Li-Ion battery
    >
    > See "http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_g10-review/"
    >
    > As he notes, Canon has decontented the G series, by going to a slower
    > (though longer range) lens, and eliminating the tilt/swivel LCD (which
    > was a great feature).


    You actually might want to try to find an older G series, from before
    they went megapixel crazy, and decontented the lens and body.

    Going over 8 megapixels (and even that's too high) with a tiny P&S
    sensor is going to get you into the kind of noise trouble that you see
    on nearly every P&S digital on the market. They should have stuck with
    6MP to 8MP with larger pixels and less noise. They should have stuck
    with a smaller LCD but kept the optical viewfinders (the G10 still has
    one, but they're becoming increasingly rare).
    SMS, Aug 10, 2009
    #14
  15. HerHusband

    SMS Guest

    Fotoguy wrote:

    > Take a look at the Canon Powershot SX-200 IS. It meets all your
    > requirements. And is well under $500.


    No it doesn't.

    Start-up time and lag times are poor. Image quality is okay, but not
    terrific.

    "http://reviews.cnet.com/digital-cameras/canon-powershot-sx200-is/4505-6501_7-33529067.html"

    There's really no camera that meets his criteria. I'd say the G10 comes
    the closest, but what he wants in terms of start-up and lag time don't
    exist in a P&S.

    He wants what many people want in a compact P&S: the speed of a D-SLR,
    the lens ranges that you only get with 2 or 3 lenses on a D-SLR, with
    the same quality you get with those 3 lenses.

    Many people also want world peace, but they're not going to get that either.
    SMS, Aug 11, 2009
    #15
  16. HerHusband

    HerHusband Guest

    > There's really no camera that meets his criteria. I'd say the G10
    > comes the closest, but what he wants in terms of start-up and lag time
    > don't exist in a P&S.
    > He wants what many people want in a compact P&S: the speed of a D-SLR,
    > the lens ranges that you only get with 2 or 3 lenses on a D-SLR, with
    > the same quality you get with those 3 lenses.


    I have no need for the manual controls or multiple lenses of a DSLR, just
    something that starts quickly, has a "decent" zoom, and takes good
    pictures. That doesn't seem like too much too ask of a P&S camera, even if
    no manufacturer currently makes one.

    In any case, I hear DSLR touted as "fast", so just what kind of start up
    times and picture-to-picture delays are typical with a DSLR?

    Thanks,

    Anthony
    HerHusband, Aug 11, 2009
    #16
  17. HerHusband

    Fotoguy Guest

    On Tue, 11 Aug 2009 16:19:04 +0000, HerHusband wrote:

    >> There's really no camera that meets his criteria. I'd say the G10 comes
    >> the closest, but what he wants in terms of start-up and lag time don't
    >> exist in a P&S.
    >> He wants what many people want in a compact P&S: the speed of a D-SLR,
    >> the lens ranges that you only get with 2 or 3 lenses on a D-SLR, with
    >> the same quality you get with those 3 lenses.

    >
    > I have no need for the manual controls or multiple lenses of a DSLR,
    > just something that starts quickly, has a "decent" zoom, and takes good
    > pictures. That doesn't seem like too much too ask of a P&S camera, even
    > if no manufacturer currently makes one.


    Sometimes, it is asking too much. Your requirements are well beyond what
    the average point-n-shoot user really needs.

    > In any case, I hear DSLR touted as "fast", so just what kind of start up
    > times and picture-to-picture delays are typical with a DSLR?


    With better DSLRs, start-up is almost instantaneous--a tenth of a second
    or so--with start-up to first shot a few tenths. Entry level DSLRs are
    slower, sometimes not much faster than a higher end point-n-shoot, but
    generally a second or less, with start-up to first shot being as much as
    2 or 3 seconds. However, leaving the camera "on" greatly improves quick
    shot capability. DSLRs are designed to be left on for extended periods
    of time. So, don't be concerned. I've accidently left mine on overnight
    after shooting several hundred exposures, and then shot several hundred
    more without the battery dying.

    There's little picture-to-picture delay with a DSLR: as fast as you can
    press the button usually. Even the entry level DSLRs are capable of
    continuous frame rates of 2.5 to 3 per second.


    --
    Fotoguy
    BestInClass.com
    "Personalized digital camera recommendations"
    http://www.bestinclass.com/digital-cameras
    Fotoguy, Aug 11, 2009
    #17
  18. On Aug 11, 11:52 am, wrote:

    > Try this site also
    >
    >  http://www.cameras.co.uk/html/shutter-lag-comparisons.cfm


    Yes, that's an extremely useful site. I wish more people would go
    there before buying a P&S camera so they could see the differences in
    lag times.

    I don't think the start-up time is such a big deal because by the time
    you get the camera out and up to your face you can press the power
    button and be ready, but lag time is a very big issue for most users.
    Kelly Danvers, Aug 12, 2009
    #18
  19. On Wed, 12 Aug 2009 05:56:45 -0700 (PDT), Kelly Danvers
    <> wrote:

    >On Aug 11, 11:52 am, wrote:
    >
    >> Try this site also
    >>
    >>  http://www.cameras.co.uk/html/shutter-lag-comparisons.cfm

    >
    >Yes, that's an extremely useful site. I wish more people would go
    >there before buying a P&S camera so they could see the differences in
    >lag times.


    Except for all those times listed are in grievous error. Posted by a fool
    with an agenda. Propagated by even bigger fools with similar agendas.

    One quick example, the shutter-lag of most Powershots is only 55ms (0.055
    seconds) when mechanically pressed, 45ms (0.045 seconds) when triggered by
    CHDK scripts. Not ONE of his speed measurements is correct. 5 photos shot
    in high-speed continuous mode on my Powershot only takes 2 seconds. That
    speed is continuous until the card is full, there is no slow-down at any
    time. Where he's coming up with these 10 and 11 second durations for 5
    shots is anyone's guess. He's probably got the cameras shoved up his ass
    where his head is at and trying to hit the shutter with his sphincter
    muscles.

    I wish that you major idiots would stop perpetuating your ignorance. But
    that would require you to be more intelligent. In this case hoping for it
    isn't going to make it happen.
    The Fools March On, Aug 12, 2009
    #19
  20. HerHusband

    Frank Janson Guest

    On Wed, 12 Aug 2009 08:23:51 -0500, The Fools March On <>
    wrote:

    >On Wed, 12 Aug 2009 05:56:45 -0700 (PDT), Kelly Danvers
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Aug 11, 11:52 am, wrote:
    >>
    >>> Try this site also
    >>>
    >>>  http://www.cameras.co.uk/html/shutter-lag-comparisons.cfm

    >>
    >>Yes, that's an extremely useful site. I wish more people would go
    >>there before buying a P&S camera so they could see the differences in
    >>lag times.

    >
    >Except for all those times listed are in grievous error. Posted by a fool
    >with an agenda. Propagated by even bigger fools with similar agendas.
    >
    >One quick example, the shutter-lag of most Powershots is only 55ms (0.055
    >seconds) when mechanically pressed, 45ms (0.045 seconds) when triggered by
    >CHDK scripts. Not ONE of his speed measurements is correct. 5 photos shot
    >in high-speed continuous mode on my Powershot only takes 2 seconds. That
    >speed is continuous until the card is full, there is no slow-down at any
    >time. Where he's coming up with these 10 and 11 second durations for 5
    >shots is anyone's guess. He's probably got the cameras shoved up his ass
    >where his head is at and trying to hit the shutter with his sphincter
    >muscles.
    >
    >I wish that you major idiots would stop perpetuating your ignorance. But
    >that would require you to be more intelligent. In this case hoping for it
    >isn't going to make it happen.


    Well, what do you expect from any citizen from the UK? All that inbreeding
    all these centuries has greatly degraded their intellect. Look at their
    "royalty" as perfect proof. There's a worldwide petition to have UK stand
    for "Unintelligent Kooks"--a more accurate description of the populace.
    Frank Janson, Aug 12, 2009
    #20
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