Camera quality setting v file properties

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by certsnsearches, Mar 24, 2005.

  1. Would some kind person explain to this newbie how
    a photo taken at the highest quality setting in my camera , namely 4MP
    shows a size of 876kb when the file properties are checked.

    What do I not grasp here?

    Brian
     
    certsnsearches, Mar 24, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. certsnsearches

    paul Guest

    certsnsearches wrote:

    > Would some kind person explain to this newbie how
    > a photo taken at the highest quality setting in my camera , namely 4MP
    > shows a size of 876kb when the file properties are checked.
    >
    > What do I not grasp here?
    >
    > Brian




    MP is MegaPixels or millinos of pixels/dots.

    KB is Kilobytes or thousands of bytes.


    They are completely different. Because the image is compressed the file
    size varies but there's always the same number of pixels. Pixels the
    same color next to other save space when compressed but anyways one
    pixel can be various file sizes on disk in bytes depending on the format.
     
    paul, Mar 24, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. certsnsearches

    ecm Guest

    You'll get a lot of replies to this - but I'll take a crack anyways.

    Most (all) digital cameras can compress the image before storing it on
    the card. Some higher end digicams and digital SLR's have a "raw" mode,
    or a TIFF mode that doesn't compress at all, for a 4 Mpixel sensor the
    file size would be in the 6MB (raw) to 12 MB (TIFF) range.

    Many mainstream consumer cameras don't have this option, however; they
    use JPEG compression to a greater or lesser degree - you don't get the
    "non-lossy" "raw" or TIFF choice. JPEG is good, because the file size
    is much reduced - that means more pictures on a card. It's also bad,
    because it's "lossy" - you're actually discarding information when you
    compress a picture; in general for vacation snaps and pics of the kids
    the compression doesn't interfere with your enjoyment of the picture,
    and you can still print it out at a reasonable size without significant
    visible artifacts (eg, flaws in the pic introduced by the compression).
    In general, the more you compress the picture, the more likely
    artifacts will become noticable; also, the more aggressively you crop
    or edit the picture, the more noticable the artifacts become, because
    you're actually "zooming" the pic when you crop, and editing of
    whatever type tends to accentuate small flaws.

    So, your camera fairly aggressively compresses the pics; if you're
    happy with the pictures on your computer screen and when they're
    printed at a reasonable size, then you're set to go. If you find
    yourself wishing you could crop a bit more, or edit a bit better, it's
    time for a new camera....

    Good Luck!
    ECM
     
    ecm, Mar 24, 2005
    #3
  4. certsnsearches

    Jim Townsend Guest

    certsnsearches wrote:

    > Would some kind person explain to this newbie how
    > a photo taken at the highest quality setting in my camera , namely 4MP
    > shows a size of 876kb when the file properties are checked.
    >
    > What do I not grasp here?


    I think you're assuming a megapixel = a megabyte when
    in fact they're two different things.

    The only thing megapixel and megabyte have in common
    is that they begin with mega. Mega is the prefix that
    designates 1 million.

    A megawatt isn't a megabyte. A kilometer isn't a
    kilobyte :)

    Actually, there are three bytes required to represent
    each pixel the 8 bit color images your camera produces..

    So... The images your camera produces are:

    4 million pixels X 3 bytes = 12 megabytes

    The images are saved in JPEG format. JPEG uses a lossy but
    highly effective compression scheme. Your 12 meg images have
    been 'shrunk' down to 876 KB. When you read an image on
    your computer screen, or open it in an editor, it gets 'unshrunk'
    back to 12 megabytes.

    This shrinking obviously saves you from having to purchase a
    LOT more storage media.. That's why they compress the images
    before saving them to the memory card.
     
    Jim Townsend, Mar 24, 2005
    #4
  5. I should have added that I have not manipulated the pic with any software.
    I just took it and uploaded it from the camera to the pc directly into My
    Pictures (Windows XP)

    Brian



    "certsnsearches" <> wrote in message
    news:d1uv76$h5g$...
    > Would some kind person explain to this newbie how
    > a photo taken at the highest quality setting in my camera , namely 4MP
    > shows a size of 876kb when the file properties are checked.
    >
    > What do I not grasp here?
    >
    > Brian
    >
     
    certsnsearches, Mar 24, 2005
    #5
  6. Thank you Paul, ecm and Jim for that.

    I really appreciate it.

    Brian


    "Jim Townsend" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > certsnsearches wrote:
    >
    >> Would some kind person explain to this newbie how
    >> a photo taken at the highest quality setting in my camera , namely 4MP
    >> shows a size of 876kb when the file properties are checked.
    >>
    >> What do I not grasp here?

    >
    > I think you're assuming a megapixel = a megabyte when
    > in fact they're two different things.
    >
    > The only thing megapixel and megabyte have in common
    > is that they begin with mega. Mega is the prefix that
    > designates 1 million.
    >
    > A megawatt isn't a megabyte. A kilometer isn't a
    > kilobyte :)
    >
    > Actually, there are three bytes required to represent
    > each pixel the 8 bit color images your camera produces..
    >
    > So... The images your camera produces are:
    >
    > 4 million pixels X 3 bytes = 12 megabytes
    >
    > The images are saved in JPEG format. JPEG uses a lossy but
    > highly effective compression scheme. Your 12 meg images have
    > been 'shrunk' down to 876 KB. When you read an image on
    > your computer screen, or open it in an editor, it gets 'unshrunk'
    > back to 12 megabytes.
    >
    > This shrinking obviously saves you from having to purchase a
    > LOT more storage media.. That's why they compress the images
    > before saving them to the memory card.
    >
    >
    >
     
    certsnsearches, Mar 24, 2005
    #6
  7. "certsnsearches" <> writes:

    > Would some kind person explain to this newbie how
    > a photo taken at the highest quality setting in my camera , namely 4MP
    > shows a size of 876kb when the file properties are checked.
    >
    > What do I not grasp here?


    JPEG compression.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Mar 24, 2005
    #7
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Philly
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    780
    Miller
    Mar 5, 2006
  2. Jason.....

    problem with display properties setting change

    Jason....., Oct 24, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    6,545
  3. Howard
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    571
    William Jackson
    Dec 22, 2003
  4. John

    Quality Setting in Epson R200 - Setting your own?

    John, Jan 24, 2006, in forum: Computer Information
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    456
  5. Wowzthat

    File extension in file properties

    Wowzthat, Jun 24, 2006, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    499
    Evan Platt
    Jun 25, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page