camera field of view vs. eye

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Eigenvector, Sep 7, 2003.

  1. Eigenvector

    Eigenvector Guest

    How do I get around the camera's limited field of view when compared to what
    my eyes are seeing? Am I resigned to just taking 9 shots and pasting them
    all together? Seems wasteful, maybe you guys/gals/its have run across a
    more reasonable approach?

    Here is the situation that prompted this question if you need some context.
    I was hiking up a steep trail this afternoon and was trying to get a good
    representative shot of the terrain I was on. I couldn't do it with my Oly
    C720. The ground was sloping up at a 40 degree angle, and I wanted to get a
    shot of what I saw, which was pretty striking - the ground rising up
    sharply, the summit at the top of my field of view. I could either get a
    shot of the summit, or a shot of a bunch of blueberry bushes and a dusty
    trail.

    Is a wide angle lens my only recourse here?
     
    Eigenvector, Sep 7, 2003
    #1
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  2. "Eigenvector" <> wrote in message
    news:8Rx6b.74$...
    > How do I get around the camera's limited field of view when compared to

    what
    > my eyes are seeing?


    >
    > The ground was sloping up at a 40 degree angle, and I wanted to get a
    > shot of what I saw, which was pretty striking - the ground rising up
    > sharply, the summit at the top of my field of view. I could either get a
    > shot of the summit, or a shot of a bunch of blueberry bushes and a dusty
    > trail.
    >
    > Is a wide angle lens my only recourse here?


    Pretty much, or you have to move way back, as in rent a helicopter. IIRC
    with 35mm film cameras, a wide angle lens of 28 mm simulated what most
    people take in with their eyes. I don't know what your camera would need to
    be comparable.
    Ed
     
    Edwin Pawlowski, Sep 7, 2003
    #2
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  3. Eigenvector

    Eigenvector Guest

    "Edwin Pawlowski" <> wrote in message
    news:2Xx6b.5318$...
    >
    > "Eigenvector" <> wrote in message
    > news:8Rx6b.74$...
    > > How do I get around the camera's limited field of view when compared to

    > what
    > > my eyes are seeing?

    >
    > >
    > > The ground was sloping up at a 40 degree angle, and I wanted to get a
    > > shot of what I saw, which was pretty striking - the ground rising up
    > > sharply, the summit at the top of my field of view. I could either get

    a
    > > shot of the summit, or a shot of a bunch of blueberry bushes and a dusty
    > > trail.
    > >
    > > Is a wide angle lens my only recourse here?

    >
    > Pretty much, or you have to move way back, as in rent a helicopter. IIRC
    > with 35mm film cameras, a wide angle lens of 28 mm simulated what most
    > people take in with their eyes. I don't know what your camera would need

    to
    > be comparable.
    > Ed
    >
    >

    Don't wide angle lenses produce a sort of fish-eye view of the world
    though - or is that only with a particular type of lens.
     
    Eigenvector, Sep 7, 2003
    #3
  4. Eigenvector

    Mxsmanic Guest

    Eigenvector writes:

    > How do I get around the camera's limited field of view
    > when compared to what my eyes are seeing? Am I resigned
    > to just taking 9 shots and pasting them all together?


    Yes.

    The field of view of human eyes exceeds 180° horizontally. Even a
    fisheye lens won't match that.

    However, you can improve realism of shots in a number of ways. One way
    is to paste shots into a panorama as you describe. Another way is to
    take shots using a wide-angle, rectilinear lens, make very large prints,
    and then view them at close range, which fills a large part of the
    visual field and improves realism (this is the method used by wide
    screens at the cinema and IMAX films to increase realism). In general,
    the larger the portion of the visual field that you can fill with your
    photo image, the greater the "you are there" realism is likely to be.

    > Is a wide angle lens my only recourse here?


    Either a wide angle or a panoramic shot.

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
     
    Mxsmanic, Sep 7, 2003
    #4
  5. "Eigenvector" <> wrote in message news:N9A6b.67> > >
    > Don't wide angle lenses produce a sort of fish-eye view of the world
    > though - or is that only with a particular type of lens.


    All wide angles have some distortion.(Actually, all lenses do) On a 35 mm
    camera. a 35 mm lens is barely noticeable, 28 mm is getting distorted more
    in the corners and wider is getting close to the true "fish eye" lens. The
    format, being rectangular, leaves out some of the top and bottom that the
    lens is seeing making the distortion less noticed.

    In truth, a lot of things happen with our eyes, but the brain compensates
    for it. We are less likely to notice color shift unless we make a
    conscience effort to do so.
    Ed
     
    Edwin Pawlowski, Sep 7, 2003
    #5
  6. Eigenvector

    Fel Tramain Guest

    > How do I get around the camera's limited field of view when compared to what
    > my eyes are seeing? Am I resigned to just taking 9 shots and pasting them
    > all together? Seems wasteful, maybe you guys/gals/its have run across a
    > more reasonable approach?


    I find just the opposite problem a reality. When I look at something, then
    try to get it with the camera, you can't even see it anymore it is too small and
    far back. I have to have the zoom constantly at maximum just so I can get in
    the camera what my eyes are seeing.

    > Is a wide angle lens my only recourse here?


    ???
     
    Fel Tramain, Sep 8, 2003
    #6
  7. Eigenvector

    Don Stauffer Guest

    One big problem here is that the eye works quite a bit differently than
    a camera when talking really large fields of view. The analogy between
    eye and camera only works when we are talking about a narrow field of
    view, part of what the eye sees.

    The human eye only has good visual acuity in the center of the field of
    view, the so-called macular region of about a degree or so. While the
    eye does have a very large field of view, the periphery has very low
    resolution, many of the few cells in region wired together in parallel.

    What humans do is to scan the eye, moving the macular region around, and
    the brain maps these areas and builds up a picture in the mind.

    While people have talked about a camera built this way, it has not
    happened yet. Normal CCD arrays would not work, it must use something
    like an addressable diode array.

    As a result, while we can use pan software to piece images together on
    paper, and this is probably the closest thing we can get to what our
    brain sees, it is still not exactly the same. The brain is funny that
    way, hence all the popular optical illusions and such.

    --
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

    webpage- http://www.usfamily.net/web/stauffer
     
    Don Stauffer, Sep 8, 2003
    #7
  8. Eigenvector

    gr Guest

    "Graham" <> wrote
    >
    > Of course stitching shots together for a panorama is one approach, but
    > this really doesn't help when you need both width and height, such as
    > when you're at the top of a steep hill with a spectacular view in front
    > of you. A panorama with 120degrees of width but only 25degrees of height
    > isn't the same as a single shot 90degrees wide by 60degrees high.


    I've gone to the trouble (only once!) of stitching together multiple
    panoramas to get just the effect you desire. It gave okay results, but
    distortion effects made the process a PITA.
     
    gr, Sep 10, 2003
    #8
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