Calibrating a flatbed scanner

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by winegard@uhnresearch.ca, Aug 29, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Hello,

    I've seen a few articles that touch on this subject, but I wanted to
    get an answer to a bit of a different twist perhaps.

    I have the following equipment that I am using - Canon Canoscan 3000F,
    Canon i960 printer, WinXP system and both a Canon EOS Elan II film and
    a Canon S80 digital camera.

    When I print photos from my digital camera the colour reproduction of
    what I see on screen (both the LCD of the camera and my computer's CRT
    monitor (Viewsonic 17PS)) is excellent. I would not change a thing to
    be honest.

    The problem is when I scan prints from my film camera. The colour
    balance is shifted dramatically to the red/magenta wihch becomes even
    more visible when I print it. The issue at hand is that I really do
    not want to calibrate my printer or monitor at all because the combo
    for digital photography is working great. I therefore want to find a
    way to specifically calibrate what my scanner is inputing. I've tried
    manipulating the scanned image after the fact using Corel
    Photopaint/Adobe Photoshop but it is very difficult to manipulate it to
    be just right (although I am going to try this with an actual scanner
    target as it may be easier to do the balancing act).

    Any input or advice would be extremely welcome.

    Thanks in advance...
     
    , Aug 29, 2006
    #1
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  2. On 28 Aug 2006 17:05:29 -0700, wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >I've seen a few articles that touch on this subject, but I wanted to
    >get an answer to a bit of a different twist perhaps.
    >
    >I have the following equipment that I am using - Canon Canoscan 3000F,
    >Canon i960 printer, WinXP system and both a Canon EOS Elan II film and
    >a Canon S80 digital camera.
    >
    >When I print photos from my digital camera the colour reproduction of
    >what I see on screen (both the LCD of the camera and my computer's CRT
    >monitor (Viewsonic 17PS)) is excellent. I would not change a thing to
    >be honest.
    >
    >The problem is when I scan prints from my film camera. The colour
    >balance is shifted dramatically to the red/magenta wihch becomes even
    >more visible when I print it. The issue at hand is that I really do
    >not want to calibrate my printer or monitor at all because the combo
    >for digital photography is working great. I therefore want to find a
    >way to specifically calibrate what my scanner is inputing. I've tried
    >manipulating the scanned image after the fact using Corel
    >Photopaint/Adobe Photoshop but it is very difficult to manipulate it to
    >be just right (although I am going to try this with an actual scanner
    >target as it may be easier to do the balancing act).
    >
    >Any input or advice would be extremely welcome.
    >
    >Thanks in advance...



    Barring any pathological issues with your scanner, you can
    generate an ICC profile for it with Profile Prism. Last time I
    checked it was selling for around $70.

    www.ddisoftware.com

    Not saying this is the answer to your situation -- there could
    be all kinds of things going on -- but it's one option.

    If it's a cheap or old scanner, it's probably not worth the
    bother. I've owned many scanners (both film and flatbed)
    and never bothered to profile any of them.


    rafe b
    www.terrapinphoto.com
     
    Raphael Bustin, Aug 29, 2006
    #2
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  3. Wine-R Guest

    Thanks for this - I'll check out Profile Prism.

    BTW - in case I decide replacing the scanner is my best option - any
    recommendations for a device that seems to have good colour fidelity?

    Many thanks.


    Raphael Bustin wrote:
    > On 28 Aug 2006 17:05:29 -0700, wrote:
    >
    > >Hello,
    > >
    > >I've seen a few articles that touch on this subject, but I wanted to
    > >get an answer to a bit of a different twist perhaps.
    > >
    > >I have the following equipment that I am using - Canon Canoscan 3000F,
    > >Canon i960 printer, WinXP system and both a Canon EOS Elan II film and
    > >a Canon S80 digital camera.
    > >
    > >When I print photos from my digital camera the colour reproduction of
    > >what I see on screen (both the LCD of the camera and my computer's CRT
    > >monitor (Viewsonic 17PS)) is excellent. I would not change a thing to
    > >be honest.
    > >
    > >The problem is when I scan prints from my film camera. The colour
    > >balance is shifted dramatically to the red/magenta wihch becomes even
    > >more visible when I print it. The issue at hand is that I really do
    > >not want to calibrate my printer or monitor at all because the combo
    > >for digital photography is working great. I therefore want to find a
    > >way to specifically calibrate what my scanner is inputing. I've tried
    > >manipulating the scanned image after the fact using Corel
    > >Photopaint/Adobe Photoshop but it is very difficult to manipulate it to
    > >be just right (although I am going to try this with an actual scanner
    > >target as it may be easier to do the balancing act).
    > >
    > >Any input or advice would be extremely welcome.
    > >
    > >Thanks in advance...

    >
    >
    > Barring any pathological issues with your scanner, you can
    > generate an ICC profile for it with Profile Prism. Last time I
    > checked it was selling for around $70.
    >
    > www.ddisoftware.com
    >
    > Not saying this is the answer to your situation -- there could
    > be all kinds of things going on -- but it's one option.
    >
    > If it's a cheap or old scanner, it's probably not worth the
    > bother. I've owned many scanners (both film and flatbed)
    > and never bothered to profile any of them.
    >
    >
    > rafe b
    > www.terrapinphoto.com
     
    Wine-R, Aug 29, 2006
    #3
  4. bmoag Guest

    You have some misconceptions about what constitutes calibration.
    It is really only accidental that you are achieving prints that match your
    monitor unless you calibrate the monitor and use color management properly
    in a color managed imaging program like Elements/Photoshop.
    It is most likely your workflow and not the scanner that is at fault.
    The red shift you are describing is common when, whether you realize it, or
    as in this case do not realize it, your scanning and printing programs are
    applying some form of color management more than once.
    Unless you take control of the situation your problems may worsen.
    It is more difficult to learn to do things properly than to walk into Best
    Buy and plunk down your credit card, but the world is full of choices.
     
    bmoag, Aug 29, 2006
    #4
  5. Wine-R Guest

    Thanks (I think) since you do not actually offer any suggestions as to
    how to help out.

    Actually you are correct that I was simply lucky - because when I
    started trying to figure out how to calibrate my scanner I checked the
    calibration of the monitor and printer using WiziWYG from Praxisoft and
    other than some corrections to the gamma (being an older monitor it was
    set at around 2.4) I did not have to change much at all. But that
    still does not fix my problem about the redshift I am getting from my
    scanner. Clearly images imported from my digital camera (actually
    either of my digital cameras - my older Fuji and my newer Canon) look
    very good (maybe not perfect but very good) and print out with high
    fidelity. Scanned images however are very redshifted.

    If it is common as you say then a) what causes it and b) how do I fix
    it. Your comment about it being more difficult to learn how to do
    things properly vs going to BestBuy is both unnecessary and unhelpful -
    I would not be writing to this forum if I were not looking how to do
    things properly.


    bmoag wrote:
    > You have some misconceptions about what constitutes calibration.
    > It is really only accidental that you are achieving prints that match your
    > monitor unless you calibrate the monitor and use color management properly
    > in a color managed imaging program like Elements/Photoshop.
    > It is most likely your workflow and not the scanner that is at fault.
    > The red shift you are describing is common when, whether you realize it, or
    > as in this case do not realize it, your scanning and printing programs are
    > applying some form of color management more than once.
    > Unless you take control of the situation your problems may worsen.
    > It is more difficult to learn to do things properly than to walk into Best
    > Buy and plunk down your credit card, but the world is full of choices.
     
    Wine-R, Aug 29, 2006
    #5
  6. rafe b Guest

    "bmoag" <> wrote in message
    news:uDQIg.4519$...
    > You have some misconceptions about what constitutes calibration.
    > It is really only accidental that you are achieving prints that match your
    > monitor unless you calibrate the monitor and use color management properly
    > in a color managed imaging program like Elements/Photoshop.
    > It is most likely your workflow and not the scanner that is at fault.
    > The red shift you are describing is common when, whether you realize it,
    > or as in this case do not realize it, your scanning and printing programs
    > are applying some form of color management more than once.
    > Unless you take control of the situation your problems may worsen.
    > It is more difficult to learn to do things properly than to walk into Best
    > Buy and plunk down your credit card, but the world is full of choices.



    Even so -- the fact that the OP's process is working --
    for digicam images -- suggests that he may be doing some
    things right. Perhaps some careful experimentation is in
    order -- but it doesn't sound to me like there's a problem
    in the image-editor-to-printer part of the process.

    I'm not a big believer in scanner calibration or profiling,
    and have never felt a need to do that. OTOH, the rest of
    my system is color managed.

    OP asked about "scanner color fidelity" and I honestly
    don't have much to say about that. It's never been a
    real problem for me. But since most of what I scan are
    color negatives, it's hard to speak of "color fidelity" at
    that stage of the process.


    rafe b
    www.terrapinphoto.com
     
    rafe b, Aug 29, 2006
    #6
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