Cabling Tools

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by rainman, Jun 17, 2005.

  1. rainman

    rainman Guest

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    I'm looking at a job for laying network cable, and I'm looking for a
    good source of tools for doing such a job, because it appears I have to
    provide my own. The cable will be CAT5, and possibly fiber. I have a
    CAT5 crimper, but that's about it. What about a punchdown tool?

    Any advice/suggestions welcome.

    Rainman
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    rainman, Jun 17, 2005
    #1
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  2. rainman

    D. Brown Guest

    "rainman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > I'm looking at a job for laying network cable, and I'm looking for a
    > good source of tools for doing such a job, because it appears I have to
    > provide my own. The cable will be CAT5, and possibly fiber. I have a
    > CAT5 crimper, but that's about it. What about a punchdown tool?
    >
    > Any advice/suggestions welcome.
    >


    Graybar http://tinyurl.com/d9xmo if you have them in your area, and believe
    it or not Lowe's and Home Depot carries punch down tools among other common
    network cabling tools.
     
    D. Brown, Jun 17, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. rainman

    AG Guest

    If you are going to be doing fiber your employer should buy your tools and
    train you too for that matter.
    I know a local electrician sent all of his guys to school about 5 years ago
    because he figured that was the next big thing. He's gone from having about
    4 trucks to 8 or 9 at the one location here and town and I don't know how
    many he has at his second location.
    Graybar also has the fiber stuff if you just want to price it.

    AG


    "Rightard Whitey" <> wrote in message >> Graybar
    http://tinyurl.com/d9xmo if you have them in your area, and believe
    >> it or not Lowe's and Home Depot carries punch down tools among other
    >> common network cabling tools.

    > Ebay carries a variety of LAN tools under the IT or telecommunications
    > heading. So does Home Depot. You will need a punch down tool, crimping
    > tool, cable tester, a headlight LED for crawling through attacks and a
    > fishing tool to grab cable.
    >
    > forget fiber optics. You need to go to schools to learn how to do it. Most
    > of the fiber splicing and polishing equipment cost thousands of dollars.
    >
    > --
    > A village in Texas has lost its idiot.
     
    AG, Jun 18, 2005
    #3
  4. rainman

    Glenn Guest

    You will need two punchdowns, a type 110 and a type 66. you will also
    need a cable tester. (big bucks). I wouldn't hire anybody that couldn't
    test the cable after making it. You do know about the two types of CAT
    5 connections don't yoou?

    rainman wrote:

    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > I'm looking at a job for laying network cable, and I'm looking for a
    > good source of tools for doing such a job, because it appears I have to
    > provide my own. The cable will be CAT5, and possibly fiber. I have a
    > CAT5 crimper, but that's about it. What about a punchdown tool?
    >
    > Any advice/suggestions welcome.
    >
    > Rainman
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    > Version: GnuPG v1.4.1 (MingW32)
    > Comment: Using GnuPG with Thunderbird - http://enigmail.mozdev.org
    >
    > iD8DBQFCsxb19ZOMhmWO5XkRAlsLAJ9+ttbhwBj1WlvfNMGl/HVzkUKebgCfWyGw
    > YWrqcKmVdzgO/6Sxu1KRSC8=
    > =HI30
    > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
     
    Glenn, Jun 18, 2005
    #4
  5. rainman

    rainman Guest

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    Thank you to all who responded. You've all been very helpful.

    to Glenn:
    I know TIA standards for 568A ( w/g, g, w/o, b, w/b, o, w/br, br) and
    568B (w/o, o, w/g, b, w/b, g, w/br, br), if that's what you're asking.

    What I don't know is color coding and wiring for a 110 or 66 block. (In
    fact, I'm a bit sketchy on them period... as I've never used one... and
    I think I'm going to be expected to know how). From what I understand,
    they are used as a sort of "patch panel", but with different connectors.
    You use a "punchdown tool" to somehow attach the pairs to the panel, and
    trim the excess wire. You then snap on some kind of termination, and you
    can attach a cable to connect two sets of wires, or to connect the cable
    to a separate device (like a patch panel) with a patch cable.

    Rainman

    Glenn wrote:
    > You will need two punchdowns, a type 110 and a type 66. you will also
    > need a cable tester. (big bucks). I wouldn't hire anybody that couldn't
    > test the cable after making it. You do know about the two types of CAT
    > 5 connections don't yoou?
    >
    > rainman wrote:
    >
    > I'm looking at a job for laying network cable, and I'm looking for a
    > good source of tools for doing such a job, because it appears I have to
    > provide my own. The cable will be CAT5, and possibly fiber. I have a
    > CAT5 crimper, but that's about it. What about a punchdown tool?
    >
    > Any advice/suggestions welcome.
    >
    > Rainman

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    rainman, Jun 18, 2005
    #5
  6. rainman

    D. Brown Guest

    "rainman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > Thank you to all who responded. You've all been very helpful.
    >
    > to Glenn:
    > I know TIA standards for 568A ( w/g, g, w/o, b, w/b, o, w/br, br) and
    > 568B (w/o, o, w/g, b, w/b, g, w/br, br), if that's what you're asking.
    >
    > What I don't know is color coding and wiring for a 110 or 66 block. (In
    > fact, I'm a bit sketchy on them period... as I've never used one... and
    > I think I'm going to be expected to know how). From what I understand,
    > they are used as a sort of "patch panel", but with different connectors.
    > You use a "punchdown tool" to somehow attach the pairs to the panel, and
    > trim the excess wire. You then snap on some kind of termination, and you
    > can attach a cable to connect two sets of wires, or to connect the cable
    > to a separate device (like a patch panel) with a patch cable.
    >
    > Rainman
    >

    -----

    This is for the 110 block.

    http://cableorganizer.com/phone-data-connection-blocks/110-installation-instructions.htm

    and the 66

    http://cableorganizer.com/phone-data-connection-blocks/66-installation-instructions.htm

    and the color code

    http://www.homephonewiring.com/clr-code.html

    This is easy stuff once you get the gist of it, I say you'll have it down
    within two weeks on the job.

    Good Luck
     
    D. Brown, Jun 18, 2005
    #6
  7. rainman

    AG Guest

    "rainman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > Thank you to all who responded. You've all been very helpful.
    >
    > to Glenn:
    > I know TIA standards for 568A ( w/g, g, w/o, b, w/b, o, w/br, br) and
    > 568B (w/o, o, w/g, b, w/b, g, w/br, br), if that's what you're asking.
    >
    > What I don't know is color coding and wiring for a 110 or 66 block. (In
    > fact, I'm a bit sketchy on them period... as I've never used one... and
    > I think I'm going to be expected to know how). From what I understand,
    > they are used as a sort of "patch panel", but with different connectors.
    > You use a "punchdown tool" to somehow attach the pairs to the panel, and
    > trim the excess wire. You then snap on some kind of termination, and you
    > can attach a cable to connect two sets of wires, or to connect the cable
    > to a separate device (like a patch panel) with a patch cable.
    >
    > Rainman
    >


    The color codes are on the side of the punchdown block. I've never bothered
    to memorize them. For me it's a why bother.

    AG
     
    AG, Jun 19, 2005
    #7
  8. rainman

    AG Guest

    "Glenn" <> wrote in message
    news:YYUse.2580$...
    > You will need two punchdowns, a type 110 and a type 66. you will also
    > need a cable tester. (big bucks). I wouldn't hire anybody that couldn't
    > test the cable after making it. You do know about the two types of CAT 5
    > connections don't yoou?
    >
    > rainman wrote:
    >


    My tester cost me $20. All it does is check continuity but it does check
    the cable.
    Any employer that wanted more would almost certainly not expect an
    individual to buy a tool that can run more than $500-$600. I've used them
    and they were always provided by my employer.

    AG
     
    AG, Jun 19, 2005
    #8
  9. On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 11:23:06 GMT, "AG" <> wrote:

    >
    >"rainman" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    >> Hash: SHA1
    >>
    >> Thank you to all who responded. You've all been very helpful.
    >>
    >> to Glenn:
    >> I know TIA standards for 568A ( w/g, g, w/o, b, w/b, o, w/br, br) and
    >> 568B (w/o, o, w/g, b, w/b, g, w/br, br), if that's what you're asking.
    >>
    >> What I don't know is color coding and wiring for a 110 or 66 block. (In
    >> fact, I'm a bit sketchy on them period... as I've never used one... and
    >> I think I'm going to be expected to know how). From what I understand,
    >> they are used as a sort of "patch panel", but with different connectors.
    >> You use a "punchdown tool" to somehow attach the pairs to the panel, and
    >> trim the excess wire. You then snap on some kind of termination, and you
    >> can attach a cable to connect two sets of wires, or to connect the cable
    >> to a separate device (like a patch panel) with a patch cable.
    >>
    >> Rainman
    >>

    >
    >The color codes are on the side of the punchdown block. I've never bothered
    >to memorize them. For me it's a why bother.


    You and I have the same basic attitude about this. Several hours to
    research something is one thing, but if information is readily and
    quickly available, I reserve my remaining 7 brain cells for other
    things. :)

    Tom

    >
    >AG
    >
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Jun 19, 2005
    #9
  10. rainman

    Glenn Guest

    I have an MT-350 myself. Checking continuity is not ehough.


    AG wrote:
    > "Glenn" <> wrote in message
    > news:YYUse.2580$...
    >
    >>You will need two punchdowns, a type 110 and a type 66. you will also
    >>need a cable tester. (big bucks). I wouldn't hire anybody that couldn't
    >>test the cable after making it. You do know about the two types of CAT 5
    >>connections don't yoou?
    >>
    >>rainman wrote:
    >>

    >
    >
    > My tester cost me $20. All it does is check continuity but it does check
    > the cable.
    > Any employer that wanted more would almost certainly not expect an
    > individual to buy a tool that can run more than $500-$600. I've used them
    > and they were always provided by my employer.
    >
    > AG
    >
    >
     
    Glenn, Jun 19, 2005
    #10
  11. rainman

    Glenn Guest

    You will seldom see a type 66. that's the old type. I would get a
    flunky job with some company to learn the ins and outs and the
    "gotchas". There is a lot molre to it than just running a cable from a
    to b and making a few connections.
    P.S. I was with IBM for 42 years.

    AG wrote:

    > "Glenn" <> wrote in message
    > news:YYUse.2580$...
    >
    >>You will need two punchdowns, a type 110 and a type 66. you will also
    >>need a cable tester. (big bucks). I wouldn't hire anybody that couldn't
    >>test the cable after making it. You do know about the two types of CAT 5
    >>connections don't yoou?
    >>
    >>rainman wrote:
    >>

    >
    >
    > My tester cost me $20. All it does is check continuity but it does check
    > the cable.
    > Any employer that wanted more would almost certainly not expect an
    > individual to buy a tool that can run more than $500-$600. I've used them
    > and they were always provided by my employer.
    >
    > AG
    >
    >
     
    Glenn, Jun 19, 2005
    #11
  12. On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 18:33:15 GMT, Glenn <> wrote:

    >I have an MT-350 myself. Checking continuity is not ehough.
    >


    What tests does it do? Other than physical length, a lot of the tests
    I see can be done using a multi-meter, although that could be
    time-consuming. Length is a toughie; even our LC-102
    capacitor/inductor checker (which would measure cable length) at the
    electronics repair shop I last worked at cost a pretty penny.

    Tom

    >
    >AG wrote:
    >> "Glenn" <> wrote in message
    >> news:YYUse.2580$...
    >>
    >>>You will need two punchdowns, a type 110 and a type 66. you will also
    >>>need a cable tester. (big bucks). I wouldn't hire anybody that couldn't
    >>>test the cable after making it. You do know about the two types of CAT 5
    >>>connections don't yoou?
    >>>
    >>>rainman wrote:
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> My tester cost me $20. All it does is check continuity but it does check
    >> the cable.
    >> Any employer that wanted more would almost certainly not expect an
    >> individual to buy a tool that can run more than $500-$600. I've used them
    >> and they were always provided by my employer.
    >>
    >> AG
    >>
    >>
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Jun 19, 2005
    #12
  13. rainman

    rainman Guest

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    Thanks again to everyone who has contributed to this thread. You've all
    been very helpful, and I am learning a lot.

    I do have a few more questions, however.

    1) Is there an easy way to remove a connecting block that has already
    been placed onto the 110 board? A special tool or trick, perhaps? I
    placed one on a test board that I'm practicing with and am having the
    most difficult time removing it. Am I just not pulling hard enough or
    angling it enough?

    2) Is there any type of adapter or special cable that can be attached to
    a connecting block, in lieu of wiring a cable into the top of the
    connecting block? It would be very convenient for me, if there were a
    special connector, that could be hot-swapped easily. Particularly, if
    the other end of this adapter would have an RJ-45 port (which I could
    place on it if necessary) so I could test each of my punch-downs.

    3) My practice 110 block came with several connecting blocks for 8
    wires, which I understand... but it also came with 2 blocks for 10
    wires... which I'm having trouble understanding the purpose of. They are
    color coded, just as the 8 wire blocks, but the last pair is colored black.

    4) Physically, what is the significant difference between CAT 3, CAT 5,
    CAT 5e, and CAT 6 cables, as I understand they are all 4-pair UTP cables.

    5) What is (or where can I look for) the proper color coding for
    telephone wires/RJ-11 based cables? The internet has a lot of
    information on this, but I'm not sure which sources are accurate, and
    which are application-specific.

    6) What is USOC, and why are the transmit wires for the USOC pinout
    1235, and receive are 4678? Why the switch for the first (middle) pair?

    7) Is it worth memorizing jack color-coding at all? It seems to me that
    every brand/model jack of the same type (RJ-45, for example) has a
    different color-order.

    Sorry for all the questions... I'm learning (and lovin' it). Never
    really worked with cable *this* much before, and I really need this job
    that requires it.

    Rainman
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    rainman, Jun 20, 2005
    #13
  14. rainman

    Glenn Guest

    there are 2 sets of wiring sequences (A and B)
    The difference is the twists per foot and the shielding.
    RJ-11 is red/green on the outside and black/yellow inside. red green is
    the voice circuit.
    If you don't split the white-green/green (or white-orange/orange) you
    will have so much crosstalk the the cable will be unusable.
    do a search on RJ45
    glenn

    rainman wrote:

    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    > Hash: SHA1
    >
    > Thanks again to everyone who has contributed to this thread. You've all
    > been very helpful, and I am learning a lot.
    >
    > I do have a few more questions, however.
    >
    > 1) Is there an easy way to remove a connecting block that has already
    > been placed onto the 110 board? A special tool or trick, perhaps? I
    > placed one on a test board that I'm practicing with and am having the
    > most difficult time removing it. Am I just not pulling hard enough or
    > angling it enough?
    >
    > 2) Is there any type of adapter or special cable that can be attached to
    > a connecting block, in lieu of wiring a cable into the top of the
    > connecting block? It would be very convenient for me, if there were a
    > special connector, that could be hot-swapped easily. Particularly, if
    > the other end of this adapter would have an RJ-45 port (which I could
    > place on it if necessary) so I could test each of my punch-downs.
    >
    > 3) My practice 110 block came with several connecting blocks for 8
    > wires, which I understand... but it also came with 2 blocks for 10
    > wires... which I'm having trouble understanding the purpose of. They are
    > color coded, just as the 8 wire blocks, but the last pair is colored black.
    >
    > 4) Physically, what is the significant difference between CAT 3, CAT 5,
    > CAT 5e, and CAT 6 cables, as I understand they are all 4-pair UTP cables.
    >
    > 5) What is (or where can I look for) the proper color coding for
    > telephone wires/RJ-11 based cables? The internet has a lot of
    > information on this, but I'm not sure which sources are accurate, and
    > which are application-specific.
    >
    > 6) What is USOC, and why are the transmit wires for the USOC pinout
    > 1235, and receive are 4678? Why the switch for the first (middle) pair?
    >
    > 7) Is it worth memorizing jack color-coding at all? It seems to me that
    > every brand/model jack of the same type (RJ-45, for example) has a
    > different color-order.
    >
    > Sorry for all the questions... I'm learning (and lovin' it). Never
    > really worked with cable *this* much before, and I really need this job
    > that requires it.
    >
    > Rainman
    > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    > Version: GnuPG v1.4.1 (MingW32)
    > Comment: Using GnuPG with Thunderbird - http://enigmail.mozdev.org
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    > =+lYw
    > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
     
    Glenn, Jun 20, 2005
    #14
  15. rainman

    rainman Guest

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    Glenn wrote:
    > there are 2 sets of wiring sequences (A and B)
    > The difference is the twists per foot and the shielding.

    I know CAT5E has varying twist rates, but does CAT5, CAT3, and CAT6 also
    have these? And I thought that there was no shielding for CAT3,5,5E,6.
    Are they not all UTP (UN-shielded twisted pair)? Does UTP refer only to
    the pairs, and perhaps the outer jacket is shielded differently in each
    cable type?

    > RJ-11 is red/green on the outside and black/yellow inside. red green is
    > the voice circuit.
    > If you don't split the white-green/green (or white-orange/orange) you
    > will have so much crosstalk the the cable will be unusable.


    I assume you're referring to the question 6, and I understand that
    you're talking about EIA/TIA 568 standards for splitting up the RX
    wires, right? (since w/g;g and w/o;o are used for both TX and RX,
    depending on whether you're using 568A or 568B standards).

    However, what about USOC standards? Why does EIA/TIA standards only
    split up the w/g;g (or w/o;o) pair, and not any of the others, while
    USOC splits them all up?


    Anybody got any answers to the other questions?

    Thanks very much once again.

    Rainman

    > do a search on RJ45
    > glenn
    >
    > rainman wrote:
    >
    > Thanks again to everyone who has contributed to this thread. You've all
    > been very helpful, and I am learning a lot.
    >
    > I do have a few more questions, however.
    >
    > 1) Is there an easy way to remove a connecting block that has already
    > been placed onto the 110 board? A special tool or trick, perhaps? I
    > placed one on a test board that I'm practicing with and am having the
    > most difficult time removing it. Am I just not pulling hard enough or
    > angling it enough?
    >
    > 2) Is there any type of adapter or special cable that can be attached to
    > a connecting block, in lieu of wiring a cable into the top of the
    > connecting block? It would be very convenient for me, if there were a
    > special connector, that could be hot-swapped easily. Particularly, if
    > the other end of this adapter would have an RJ-45 port (which I could
    > place on it if necessary) so I could test each of my punch-downs.
    >
    > 3) My practice 110 block came with several connecting blocks for 8
    > wires, which I understand... but it also came with 2 blocks for 10
    > wires... which I'm having trouble understanding the purpose of. They are
    > color coded, just as the 8 wire blocks, but the last pair is colored
    > black.
    >
    > 4) Physically, what is the significant difference between CAT 3, CAT 5,
    > CAT 5e, and CAT 6 cables, as I understand they are all 4-pair UTP cables.
    >
    > 5) What is (or where can I look for) the proper color coding for
    > telephone wires/RJ-11 based cables? The internet has a lot of
    > information on this, but I'm not sure which sources are accurate, and
    > which are application-specific.
    >
    > 6) What is USOC, and why are the transmit wires for the USOC pinout
    > 1235, and receive are 4678? Why the switch for the first (middle) pair?
    >
    > 7) Is it worth memorizing jack color-coding at all? It seems to me that
    > every brand/model jack of the same type (RJ-45, for example) has a
    > different color-order.
    >
    > Sorry for all the questions... I'm learning (and lovin' it). Never
    > really worked with cable *this* much before, and I really need this job
    > that requires it.
    >
    > Rainman

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    rainman, Jun 21, 2005
    #15
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