cable modem not working with router

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by email7373388@kinglibrary.net, Oct 20, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Anybody had this issue / resolved it?

    Mediacom cable, cable modem SURFboard SB4200
    Router DLINK DI-604
    Windows XP Pro, I'm a fairly saavy networking user

    Everything was working fine for over a year, had a lightning storm and
    after that the internet wouldn't connect. Here's what is interesting:

    If I connect my PC directly to the cable modem, the internet comes up
    just fine. ipconfig /renew gives me an address and I'm good to go.
    This suggests that the cable modem and PC work fine, problem must be
    the router.

    I get another DI-604 router and try it, but it doesn't work either. I
    powered everything off and on, I clone the MAC address on my card to
    the modem, and I try several times, using the router's web interface,
    to renew the IP address with the cable modem's DHCP and it times out
    every time.

    I then grab a COMPUSA router (which I have used before and used to
    work with this same cable modem) and it doesn't work either. Trying
    to renew the IP address with the COMPUSA router's web interface
    results in time-outs also.

    I plug the PC into the cable modem directly, and the orange activity
    light on the cable modem starts dancing. I plug either router into
    the cable modem, and the light is totally dead. No flashing,
    blinking, no nothing.

    Has anyone experienced this? Any ideas to try? I've searched usenet
    and other sites to no use.

    Matt
    matt_jk-at-hotmale.kahm
    , Oct 20, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. doS Guest

    why are you mac cloning?

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Anybody had this issue / resolved it?
    >
    > Mediacom cable, cable modem SURFboard SB4200
    > Router DLINK DI-604
    > Windows XP Pro, I'm a fairly saavy networking user
    >
    > Everything was working fine for over a year, had a lightning storm and
    > after that the internet wouldn't connect. Here's what is interesting:
    >
    > If I connect my PC directly to the cable modem, the internet comes up
    > just fine. ipconfig /renew gives me an address and I'm good to go.
    > This suggests that the cable modem and PC work fine, problem must be
    > the router.
    >
    > I get another DI-604 router and try it, but it doesn't work either. I
    > powered everything off and on, I clone the MAC address on my card to
    > the modem, and I try several times, using the router's web interface,
    > to renew the IP address with the cable modem's DHCP and it times out
    > every time.
    >
    > I then grab a COMPUSA router (which I have used before and used to
    > work with this same cable modem) and it doesn't work either. Trying
    > to renew the IP address with the COMPUSA router's web interface
    > results in time-outs also.
    >
    > I plug the PC into the cable modem directly, and the orange activity
    > light on the cable modem starts dancing. I plug either router into
    > the cable modem, and the light is totally dead. No flashing,
    > blinking, no nothing.
    >
    > Has anyone experienced this? Any ideas to try? I've searched usenet
    > and other sites to no use.
    >
    > Matt
    > matt_jk-at-hotmale.kahm
    >
    doS, Oct 20, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Buffalo Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Anybody had this issue / resolved it?
    >
    > Mediacom cable, cable modem SURFboard SB4200
    > Router DLINK DI-604
    > Windows XP Pro, I'm a fairly saavy networking user
    >
    > Everything was working fine for over a year, had a lightning storm and
    > after that the internet wouldn't connect. Here's what is interesting:
    >
    > If I connect my PC directly to the cable modem, the internet comes up
    > just fine. ipconfig /renew gives me an address and I'm good to go.
    > This suggests that the cable modem and PC work fine, problem must be
    > the router.
    >
    > I get another DI-604 router and try it, but it doesn't work either. I
    > powered everything off and on, I clone the MAC address on my card to
    > the modem, and I try several times, using the router's web interface,
    > to renew the IP address with the cable modem's DHCP and it times out
    > every time.
    >
    > I then grab a COMPUSA router (which I have used before and used to
    > work with this same cable modem) and it doesn't work either. Trying
    > to renew the IP address with the COMPUSA router's web interface
    > results in time-outs also.
    >
    > I plug the PC into the cable modem directly, and the orange activity
    > light on the cable modem starts dancing. I plug either router into
    > the cable modem, and the light is totally dead. No flashing,
    > blinking, no nothing.
    >
    > Has anyone experienced this? Any ideas to try? I've searched usenet
    > and other sites to no use.
    >
    > Matt

    Are you using the same connector on the PC when connecting to the modem
    directly and also from the router? (USB, CAT?)
    Have you tried switching the cables ( the one that goes to your PC from the
    modem with the one that goes from the Router to the PC)?
    Perhaps a cable problem?
    Though you probably tried all this, I just thought I would mention it.
    PS: if you don't get a solution here, try the virtualdr.com forum. It is
    free and very good.
    Buffalo, Oct 20, 2007
    #3
  4. Guest

    MAC cloning was a posted troubleshooting step, I guess some cable
    companies register the MAC address of the network card and won't allow
    any other MAC to connect. That isn't the case with mine, but I tried
    it anyway.
    , Oct 20, 2007
    #4
  5. Guest

    Yes thanks, tried switching cables, nothing is working. I appreciate
    your advice, I'll try that other forum.

    Matt
    , Oct 20, 2007
    #5
  6. doS Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > MAC cloning was a posted troubleshooting step, I guess some cable
    > companies register the MAC address of the network card and won't allow
    > any other MAC to connect.


    No, the config file on the ips routers "marries" the modem to the mac on the
    card, nothing that a rest wont take care of.I have seen some isps set the
    modem log in ip address(then the customer doesnt remove it, thus farcked)
    for troubleshooting, then

    That isn't the case with mine, but I tried
    > it anyway.
    >
    doS, Oct 20, 2007
    #6
  7. Guest

    !!RESOLVED!!

    In case anyone was curious how this issue was resolved, it was the
    cable modem. I took all my equipment to my brother's and found that
    the router was working just fine. So I purchased a new cable modem
    (the DLINK DCM-202 to be exact) and plugged it in and now everything
    works great.

    Apparantly, there is a difference in signal when the cable modem gets
    it from the computer vs. the router.

    Bad cable modem!!

    Thanks for all who helped,

    Matt
    , Oct 26, 2007
    #7
  8. Buffalo Guest

    wrote:
    > !!RESOLVED!!
    >
    > In case anyone was curious how this issue was resolved, it was the
    > cable modem. I took all my equipment to my brother's and found that
    > the router was working just fine. So I purchased a new cable modem
    > (the DLINK DCM-202 to be exact) and plugged it in and now everything
    > works great.
    >
    > Apparantly, there is a difference in signal when the cable modem gets
    > it from the computer vs. the router.
    >
    > Bad cable modem!!
    >
    > Thanks for all who helped,
    >
    > Matt


    Thanks for taking the tme to give the solution.
    Interesting.
    Buffalo, Oct 26, 2007
    #8
  9. larya Guest

    On Oct 20, 7:42 am, wrote:
    > Anybody had this issue / resolved it?
    >
    > Mediacom cable, cable modem SURFboard SB4200
    > Router DLINK DI-604
    > Windows XP Pro, I'm a fairly saavy networking user
    >
    > Everything was working fine for over a year, had a lightning storm and
    > after that the internet wouldn't connect. Here's what is interesting:
    >
    > If I connect my PC directly to the cable modem, the internet comes up
    > just fine. ipconfig /renew gives me an address and I'm good to go.
    > This suggests that the cable modem and PC work fine, problem must be
    > the router.
    >
    > I get another DI-604 router and try it, but it doesn't work either. I
    > powered everything off and on, I clone the MAC address on my card to
    > the modem, and I try several times, using the router's web interface,
    > to renew the IP address with the cable modem's DHCP and it times out
    > every time.
    >
    > I then grab a COMPUSA router (which I have used before and used to
    > work with this same cable modem) and it doesn't work either. Trying
    > to renew the IP address with the COMPUSA router's web interface
    > results in time-outs also.
    >
    > I plug the PC into the cable modem directly, and the orange activity
    > light on the cable modem starts dancing. I plug either router into
    > the cable modem, and the light is totally dead. No flashing,
    > blinking, no nothing.
    >
    > Has anyone experienced this? Any ideas to try? I've searched usenet
    > and other sites to no use.
    >
    > Matt
    > matt_jk-at-hotmale.kahm


    Greetings...
    I have had similar problems, except lightning wasn't one of them..

    One thing I have tried was to turn both router and modem off..for half
    a minute or so.. Then turn on the modem and allow it to settle down,
    on its own... After the modem has settled down, turn on the router
    and allow it to settle down...

    When I recently got my moden upgraded with a usb port availability,
    rogers told me that I could not use the usb and standard computer
    interface cable at the same time...

    Anyways, those have been my experiences...

    Larry
    larya, Oct 26, 2007
    #9
  10. Plato Guest

    wrote:
    >
    > Everything was working fine for over a year, had a lightning storm and
    > after that the internet wouldn't connect. Here's what is interesting:


    Too bad you didn't have any surge protectors in line. Get some to avoid
    future problems.














    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
    Plato, Oct 27, 2007
    #10
  11. Dan C Guest

    On Sat, 27 Oct 2007 03:11:04 -0500, Plato wrote:

    >> Everything was working fine for over a year, had a lightning storm and
    >> after that the internet wouldn't connect. Here's what is interesting:


    > Too bad you didn't have any surge protectors in line. Get some to avoid
    > future problems.


    A surge protector will do nothing at all to protect against a close
    lightning hit. Nothing.


    --
    "Ubuntu" -- an African word, meaning "Slackware is too hard for me".
    Dan C, Oct 27, 2007
    #11
  12. Plato Guest

    Dan C wrote:
    >
    > On Sat, 27 Oct 2007 03:11:04 -0500, Plato wrote:
    >
    > >> Everything was working fine for over a year, had a lightning storm and
    > >> after that the internet wouldn't connect. Here's what is interesting:

    >
    > > Too bad you didn't have any surge protectors in line. Get some to avoid
    > > future problems.

    >
    > A surge protector will do nothing at all to protect against a close
    > lightning hit. Nothing.



    Agreed.













    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
    Plato, Oct 29, 2007
    #12
  13. kráftéé Guest

    Plato wrote:
    > Dan C wrote:
    >>
    >> On Sat, 27 Oct 2007 03:11:04 -0500, Plato wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Everything was working fine for over a year, had a lightning
    >>>> storm and after that the internet wouldn't connect. Here's what
    >>>> is interesting:

    >>
    >>> Too bad you didn't have any surge protectors in line. Get some to
    >>> avoid future problems.

    >>
    >> A surge protector will do nothing at all to protect against a close
    >> lightning hit. Nothing.

    >
    >
    > Agreed.


    But, & it is a biggy it may have helped with a transient voltage spike
    caused by a lightning strike.

    Lightning goes it own way to the earth, so any protection is better
    than non at all...
    kráftéé, Oct 29, 2007
    #13
  14. Jim McCardle Guest

    Several Years ago my sister had a similar problem. She lives on a
    farm and is about 4km from the exchange. She had a dialup modem
    service. After a bad storm her internet died but the computer still
    worked and so did the landline phone. She asked me to look at it for
    her and the internal PCI modem had holes in the top of several
    Integrated circuits on the modem card. I have seen this sort of thing
    before but I was truly surprised that it had not wrecked the computer.
    I replaced the internal modem with an external one and installed the
    software for it and she was then a happy vegemite.

    She now has ADSL but it is an external modem and I have not yet seen a
    damaged ADSL modem but I suppose the energy in a lightning strike is
    probably enough to wreck one. We had a lightning at the place I
    worked at and it destroyed in excess of $250k worth of terminals and
    computers. We had a central computer building feeding many others by
    RS232 land lines in those days (about 10 years ago now).

    Basically what happens is that if the lightning strike was at her
    place it could momentarily move 10 or 20kv above or below the
    potential at the telephone exchange, the energy behind a lightning
    bolt is very high and will blow the shit out of any weak link. If the
    hit is at the exchange end then the phone line at the house will try
    and become elevated by the 10 or 20kv.
    Not many lightning suppressors will clamp that.

    Jim McCardle
    ====================================================

    On Mon, 29 Oct 2007 11:23:26 -0000, "kráftéé"
    <kraftee@b&e-cottee.me.uk> wrote:

    >Plato wrote:
    >> Dan C wrote:
    >>>
    >>> On Sat, 27 Oct 2007 03:11:04 -0500, Plato wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> Everything was working fine for over a year, had a lightning
    >>>>> storm and after that the internet wouldn't connect. Here's what
    >>>>> is interesting:
    >>>
    >>>> Too bad you didn't have any surge protectors in line. Get some to
    >>>> avoid future problems.
    >>>
    >>> A surge protector will do nothing at all to protect against a close
    >>> lightning hit. Nothing.

    >>
    >>
    >> Agreed.

    >
    >But, & it is a biggy it may have helped with a transient voltage spike
    >caused by a lightning strike.
    >
    >Lightning goes it own way to the earth, so any protection is better
    >than non at all...
    >
    Jim McCardle, Oct 29, 2007
    #14
  15. kráftéé Guest

    Jim McCardle wrote:
    > Several Years ago my sister had a similar problem. She lives on a
    > farm and is about 4km from the exchange. She had a dialup modem
    > service. After a bad storm her internet died but the computer still
    > worked and so did the landline phone. She asked me to look at it
    > for her and the internal PCI modem had holes in the top of several
    > Integrated circuits on the modem card. I have seen this sort of
    > thing before but I was truly surprised that it had not wrecked the
    > computer. I replaced the internal modem with an external one and
    > installed the software for it and she was then a happy vegemite.
    >
    > She now has ADSL but it is an external modem and I have not yet
    > seen a damaged ADSL modem but I suppose the energy in a lightning
    > strike is probably enough to wreck one. We had a lightning at the
    > place I worked at and it destroyed in excess of $250k worth of
    > terminals and computers. We had a central computer building
    > feeding many others by RS232 land lines in those days (about 10
    > years ago now).
    >
    > Basically what happens is that if the lightning strike was at her
    > place it could momentarily move 10 or 20kv above or below the
    > potential at the telephone exchange, the energy behind a lightning
    > bolt is very high and will blow the shit out of any weak link. If
    > the hit is at the exchange end then the phone line at the house
    > will try and become elevated by the 10 or 20kv.
    > Not many lightning suppressors will clamp that.
    >

    True but as was proved in a local lightning strike it will make it's
    way to the lowest resistance to (or should that be from) earth.

    This strike hit a 20Pr aeriel cable flashed one way into a school,
    There were reports of blue flashes going down corridors as it followed
    the internal cabling but it didn't blow any equipment as such but it
    did blow individual ports on their switches. The school had the
    normal mixture of anti surge devices

    Other users fed from the pole were a mixed bag of phones broken,
    socket working, phones working but socket blown & even a couple with
    no telephone problems but with blown televisions.

    I'm not advocating the use of any anti surge as a complete defence but
    what I'm saying is that any protection is better than nothing at all,
    just by making it a little more difficult to get thru could be enough
    for the transient to go elsewhere & your equipment could be saved
    kráftéé, Oct 29, 2007
    #15
  16. Buffalo Guest

    kráftéé wrote:
    > True but as was proved in a local lightning strike it will make it's
    > way to the lowest resistance to (or should that be from) earth.
    >
    > This strike hit a 20Pr aeriel cable flashed one way into a school,
    > There were reports of blue flashes going down corridors as it followed
    > the internal cabling but it didn't blow any equipment as such but it
    > did blow individual ports on their switches. The school had the
    > normal mixture of anti surge devices
    >
    > Other users fed from the pole were a mixed bag of phones broken,
    > socket working, phones working but socket blown & even a couple with
    > no telephone problems but with blown televisions.
    >
    > I'm not advocating the use of any anti surge as a complete defence but
    > what I'm saying is that any protection is better than nothing at all,
    > just by making it a little more difficult to get thru could be enough
    > for the transient to go elsewhere & your equipment could be saved


    Sounds good to me.
    A friend of mine must have had a close strike.
    His PC had a surge protector and didn't get hurt this time, but he lost his
    answering machine, his "wireless" indoor outdoor thermometer (how, beats me
    except that it circuitry is probably very weak and it even knocked the
    outside sending unit off a wooden post,), his Sony TV (which was off) no
    longer worked, his water pump relay mounted on the power pole was fried,
    lost a rotator on one of his ham radio antennas, fried a ham radio amplifier
    and he lost one electrical outlet in his unattached garage (nothing was
    plugged into it).
    None of the other damaged units had a surge protector.

    The outlet in the garage amazed me. It was the only one on that circuit and
    it was the outside one located within 4' from the electrical panel. It
    caused a direct short (that would also trip the main breaker feeding the
    garage), so we disconnected it at the panel and that solved that. He didn't
    want me to pull a new wire to it because he said he never used it anyways.
    It was wired in romex and I would be very interested to see where it shorted
    out (staple, connector,?). No apparent burns,smells, etc at the panel or at
    the outlet itself (yes, I remove the receptacle and looked ; and even with
    the wires off the receptacle and the breaker, the wire was still shorted).

    He has since had the power company install (at his expense) two hefty surge
    protection units (meter based units from MeterTreater) at the power pole
    and hopefully that will help a lot.
    He also has installed surge protectors on his other equipment.
    He is a ham radio operator and lives on a hilltop with many antennas poking
    up.
    I suggested that he talk to an lightning protection expert and get some more
    advice.
    He has been into ham radio for a long time and does well in national and
    world contests, actually coming in 1st in world several times and is used to
    seeing lightning while doing these contests on hills and mountain tops.
    Now maybe he will not be in the higher standing for lightning strike
    damage. :)
    Buffalo, Oct 29, 2007
    #16
  17. w_tom Guest

    On Oct 29, 12:08 pm, "Buffalo" <> wrote:
    > I suggested that he talk to anlightningprotection expert and get some more
    > advice.


    How many GFCIs, smoke detectors, and clock radios were damaged? The
    assumption was that everything without surge protectors were
    damaged. In reality, anything damaged created a circuit from the
    strike to earth. Nothing stops that current flow as some protectors
    would have us believe. Things most easily damaged would have been
    closer to that incoming surge.

    Polyphaser is a benchmark that any ham radio operator should be
    familiar with. Polyphaser discusses what provides protection.
    Protection is not defined only by a protector:
    http://www.polyphaser.com/technical_notes.aspx

    Electrical Engineering Times has two articles entitled "Protecting
    Electrical Devices from Lightning Transients" in the 1 Oct and 8 Oct
    issues. This engineering discussion is completely about protection.
    Therefore protectors are not discussed. Protectors do not provide the
    protection. Protectors simply connect to protection. Those
    engineering articles on protection (same in Polyphaser application
    notes) discuss the only thing that provides protection - earth ground.
    http://www.planetanalog.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=201807127
    http://www.planetanalog.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=201807830
    > Providing a flow path for the lightning current is central to
    > effective lightning protection.


    ARRL also discusses these concepts.

    An industry professional solved lightning damage problems in a
    Nebraska radio station. Did he install protectors? Yes. He
    installed protectors where that 'whole house' protector would connect
    surges to earth. How did he make that protection even better? He
    enhanced the earthing as even described with numbers. See "Proper
    Copper Grounding Systems Stops Lightning Damage at Nebraska FM
    Station":
    http://www.copper.org/applications/electrical/pq/casestudy/nebraska.html

    Where does surge energy get dissipated? Do you really believe a
    plug-in protector will dissipate energy that even three miles of sky
    could not stop? That energy must be dissipated somewhere. Dissipating
    the entire surge is what a protector without earthing must accomplish.

    Surge energy must be dissipated in earth where it does no harm. A
    rather small and properly earthed protector can divert massive direct
    lightning strikes to earth - without damage.

    How effective is the technology? The technology (not found in plug-
    in protectors) was proven even 100 years ago. Your telco switching
    center connects to overhead wire everywhere in town. Bell System
    analysis measured typically 100 surges during each thunderstorm. 100
    surges and no damage to their computers? Why is your phone service
    gone for four days while they replace that computer? Because the
    computer must never suffer damage.

    Telcos also use properly earthed 'whole house' protector on each
    incoming wire. Protector must be located as close to earth as
    possible and separated from protected electronics (typically up to 50
    meters from electronics). A similar device is installed on every
    subscriber line where wire enters the house. A protector does not
    provide protection. That protector only connects surges to the
    protection - earth ground.

    How many engineering sources define and demonstrate effective
    protection? Polyphaser. Electrical Engineering Times. The Nebraska
    radio station. ARRL. The telephone system in every town. In every
    case, direct lightning strikes are routinely earthed without damage
    AND the protector must remain functional after that surge. The
    technology is that routine. Products that perform effective
    protection for AC mains are sold by Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-
    Hammer, Leviton, Siemens, GE, and others. Only responsible
    manufacturers sell these effective solutions. Technology and
    protection is not found when a protector is located adjacent to
    electronics.
    w_tom, Oct 29, 2007
    #17
  18. Buffalo Guest

    w_tom wrote:
    > On Oct 29, 12:08 pm, "Buffalo" <> wrote:
    >> I suggested that he talk to a lightning protection expert and get
    >> some more advice.

    >
    > How many GFCIs, smoke detectors, and clock radios were damaged?


    None

    > The
    > assumption was that everything without surge protectors were
    > damaged.


    Sorry, wrong assumption.
    All other electrical equipment not mentioned seemed to survive, including
    all the GFIs,am-fm radios,MicroWave,Dishwasher,Disposal,Washer,Dryer,Dimmer
    Switches,Refrigerator,Garage Door Opener, PhotoCell controlled
    lights,VCR,satillite dish unit,etc.
    I was just stating that because his ham radio,PC, answering machine were on
    the same ciruit, but the PC was the only item on the surge protector. So,
    perhaps the surge protector did just enough to help.

    > In reality, anything damaged created a circuit from the
    > strike to earth.


    Maybe the surge protector put in just enough delay so that when the
    answering machine and Ham appliance got fried, they diverted the rest of the
    voltage spike to ground.

    >Nothing stops that current flow as some protectors
    > would have us believe. Things most easily damaged would have been
    > closer to that incoming surge.


    Yes, that is usually true.

    > Polyphaser is a benchmark that any ham radio operator should be
    > familiar with. Polyphaser discusses what provides protection.
    > Protection is not defined only by a protector:
    > http://www.polyphaser.com/technical_notes.aspx


    Excellent reference. I will refer my friend to this, just in case he doesn't
    know it already.

    > Electrical Engineering Times has two articles entitled "Protecting
    > Electrical Devices from Lightning Transients" in the 1 Oct and 8 Oct
    > issues. This engineering discussion is completely about protection.
    > Therefore protectors are not discussed. Protectors do not provide the
    > protection. Protectors simply connect to protection. Those
    > engineering articles on protection (same in Polyphaser application
    > notes) discuss the only thing that provides protection - earth ground.
    > http://www.planetanalog.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=201807127
    > http://www.planetanalog.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=201807830
    >> Providing a flow path for the lightning current is central to
    >> effective lightning protection.


    I will forward the above URLs to him also. Thank you.


    > ARRL also discusses these concepts.
    >
    > An industry professional solved lightning damage problems in a
    > Nebraska radio station. Did he install protectors? Yes. He
    > installed protectors where that 'whole house' protector would connect
    > surges to earth. How did he make that protection even better? He
    > enhanced the earthing as even described with numbers. See "Proper
    > Copper Grounding Systems Stops Lightning Damage at Nebraska FM
    > Station":
    >
    > http://www.copper.org/applications/electrical/pq/casestudy/nebraska.html
    >
    > Where does surge energy get dissipated? Do you really believe a
    > plug-in protector will dissipate energy that even three miles of sky
    > could not stop?


    Of course not. Surge protectors 'may' help prevent damage from a voltage
    spike

    >That energy must be dissipated somewhere.


    Doesn't a thermistor absord some of that energy when it slowly
    'disintergrates'?
    ie: voltage spike with low amperage

    Yes, usually to ground, via a grounding wire or through a bonding wire or
    through a grounding electrode conductor.

    >Dissipating
    > the entire surge is what a protector without earthing must accomplish.
    > Surge energy must be dissipated in earth where it does no harm. A
    > rather small and properly earthed protector can divert massive direct
    > lightning strikes to earth - without damage.
    >
    > How effective is the technology? The technology (not found in plug-
    > in protectors) was proven even 100 years ago. Your telco switching
    > center connects to overhead wire everywhere in town. Bell System
    > analysis measured typically 100 surges during each thunderstorm. 100
    > surges and no damage to their computers? Why is your phone service
    > gone for four days while they replace that computer? Because the
    > computer must never suffer damage.
    >
    > Telcos also use properly earthed 'whole house' protector on each
    > incoming wire. Protector must be located as close to earth as
    > possible and separated from protected electronics (typically up to 50
    > meters from electronics).


    How did you arrive at that? I was under the impression that the incoming
    telephone wire was protected right near where it entered the house and the
    protection device was usually connected to a cold water pipe via a grounding
    clamp.

    > A similar device is installed on every
    > subscriber line where wire enters the house. A protector does not
    > provide protection. That protector only connects surges to the
    > protection - earth ground.


    I think sometimes it does that through a 'spark' gap.

    >
    > How many engineering sources define and demonstrate effective
    > protection? Polyphaser. Electrical Engineering Times. The Nebraska
    > radio station. ARRL. The telephone system in every town. In every
    > case, direct lightning strikes are routinely earthed without damage
    > AND the protector must remain functional after that surge. The
    > technology is that routine. Products that perform effective
    > protection for AC mains are sold by Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-
    > Hammer, Leviton, Siemens, GE, and others. Only responsible
    > manufacturers sell these effective solutions. Technology and
    > protection is not found when a protector is located adjacent to
    > electronics.


    Is MeterTreater a responsible company in the above aspect?

    Very informative reply. Thanks
    Buffalo, Oct 29, 2007
    #18
  19. nobody > Guest

    Plato wrote:
    > Dan C wrote:
    >> On Sat, 27 Oct 2007 03:11:04 -0500, Plato wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Everything was working fine for over a year, had a lightning storm and
    >>>> after that the internet wouldn't connect. Here's what is interesting:
    >>> Too bad you didn't have any surge protectors in line. Get some to avoid
    >>> future problems.

    >> A surge protector will do nothing at all to protect against a close
    >> lightning hit. Nothing.

    >
    >
    > Agreed.
    >


    Seconded. I've seen telephones that were burnt inside (open ringer coils
    no less!) that were protected by hi-end telco suppressors. This was from
    a lightning strike about a third of a mile away.
    nobody >, Oct 29, 2007
    #19
  20. Plato Guest

    kráftéé wrote:
    >
    > Lightning goes it own way to the earth, so any protection is better
    > than non at all...



    When growing up, everybody said NOT to go under a tree in a
    thunderstorm, but they never said why. Years later I learned that if
    lightning hits the tree it instantly turns the sap/water in the tree to
    boiling, thus exploding the tree.
    Plato, Oct 30, 2007
    #20
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