Cable Broadband...

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by tRuthvalue, Aug 30, 2005.

  1. tRuthvalue

    tRuthvalue Guest

    I'm currently using Earthlink DSL and would like to switch to Comcast Cable
    Broadband. I currently rout my DSL to three computers using a LinkSys
    Phoneline Router. My entire house is wired with pairs of TV coax, all
    originating at the point of entry of the cable into the house. I would
    think my coax would be faster than the phone lines and envision a cable
    modem fed by the Comcast signal, and routed throughout my house over my
    coax. A more technically savvy [than me] friend says I might be able to
    utilize my Phoneline Router, and definitely can use a wireless setup or
    4pair ethernet cabling with the Cable modem, but that I will not be able to
    take advantage of the fact that every room in my house has 2 [pairs] of coax
    outlets.

    Is this true, or is there some way I can use my cabling to distribute a
    broadband signal throughout my house? If there are specific networking
    products/adapters necessary, I would appreciate their names.

    Thanks...
    --tRuth
     
    tRuthvalue, Aug 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. tRuthvalue

    Harrison Guest

    On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 03:14:05 GMT, "tRuthvalue" <> wrote:

    >I'm currently using Earthlink DSL and would like to switch to Comcast Cable
    >Broadband. I currently rout my DSL to three computers using a LinkSys
    >Phoneline Router. My entire house is wired with pairs of TV coax, all
    >originating at the point of entry of the cable into the house. I would
    >think my coax would be faster than the phone lines and envision a cable
    >modem fed by the Comcast signal, and routed throughout my house over my
    >coax. A more technically savvy [than me] friend says I might be able to
    >utilize my Phoneline Router, and definitely can use a wireless setup or
    >4pair ethernet cabling with the Cable modem, but that I will not be able to
    >take advantage of the fact that every room in my house has 2 [pairs] of coax
    >outlets.
    >
    >Is this true, or is there some way I can use my cabling to distribute a
    >broadband signal throughout my house? If there are specific networking
    >products/adapters necessary, I would appreciate their names.
    >
    >Thanks...
    >--tRuth


    The coax cable will deliver the signal to a cable modem.
    The cable modem will then connect to your router, which in turn connects the
    pc's to each other via ethernet and or wireless.

    The coax is not used to distribute the Internet throughout the house.
    This is still done by cat 5 (ethernet) cabling.

    You should be able to use your Linksys router.
    Make sure the firmware is updated, then reset the router to its factory
    original settings (RTFM) and run the setup CD.
    Most Linksys routers are a snap to set up on cable.
     
    Harrison, Aug 30, 2005
    #2
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  3. tRuthvalue wrote the following on 8/29/2005 8:14 PM:
    > I'm currently using Earthlink DSL and would like to switch to Comcast Cable
    > Broadband. I currently rout my DSL to three computers using a LinkSys
    > Phoneline Router. My entire house is wired with pairs of TV coax, all
    > originating at the point of entry of the cable into the house. I would
    > think my coax would be faster than the phone lines and envision a cable
    > modem fed by the Comcast signal, and routed throughout my house over my
    > coax. A more technically savvy [than me] friend says I might be able to
    > utilize my Phoneline Router, and definitely can use a wireless setup or
    > 4pair ethernet cabling with the Cable modem, but that I will not be able to
    > take advantage of the fact that every room in my house has 2 [pairs] of coax
    > outlets.
    >
    > Is this true, or is there some way I can use my cabling to distribute a
    > broadband signal throughout my house? If there are specific networking
    > products/adapters necessary, I would appreciate their names.
    >
    > Thanks...
    > --tRuth
    >
    >


    Unfortunately, no matter how many coax terminals you have throughout
    your house, you only have one point of connectivity - the cable modem.
    From there is where you branch out using the RJ-45 ports or WAP on your
    router.

    Other than that, if you want more than one cable modem in your house, I
    believe you have to purchase static IPs, which are not cheap (at least
    from Comcast).

    Honestly, though, I've asked Comcast sales and Comcast technicians about
    multiple modems per household and I get a different answer each time.

    --
    The only easy day was yesterday.
     
    ITSO azionista, Aug 30, 2005
    #3
  4. tRuthvalue

    ABS Guest

    "ITSO azionista" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > tRuthvalue wrote the following on 8/29/2005 8:14 PM:
    >> I'm currently using Earthlink DSL and would like to switch to Comcast
    >> Cable
    >> Broadband. I currently rout my DSL to three computers using a LinkSys
    >> Phoneline Router. My entire house is wired with pairs of TV coax, all
    >> originating at the point of entry of the cable into the house. I would
    >> think my coax would be faster than the phone lines and envision a cable
    >> modem fed by the Comcast signal, and routed throughout my house over my
    >> coax. A more technically savvy [than me] friend says I might be able to
    >> utilize my Phoneline Router, and definitely can use a wireless setup or
    >> 4pair ethernet cabling with the Cable modem, but that I will not be able
    >> to
    >> take advantage of the fact that every room in my house has 2 [pairs] of
    >> coax
    >> outlets.
    >>
    >> Is this true, or is there some way I can use my cabling to distribute a
    >> broadband signal throughout my house? If there are specific networking
    >> products/adapters necessary, I would appreciate their names.
    >>
    >> Thanks...
    >> --tRuth
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Unfortunately, no matter how many coax terminals you have throughout your
    > house, you only have one point of connectivity - the cable modem. From
    > there is where you branch out using the RJ-45 ports or WAP on your router.
    >
    > Other than that, if you want more than one cable modem in your house, I
    > believe you have to purchase static IPs, which are not cheap (at least
    > from Comcast).
    >
    > Honestly, though, I've asked Comcast sales and Comcast technicians about
    > multiple modems per household and I get a different answer each time.
    >
    > --
    > The only easy day was yesterday.


    Comcast doesn't sell static ips and have not for a very long time to non
    business accounts. Also in order to use multiple modems you need one account
    for each, it's fine, just ask them to bring out a new modem, provision it
    online and you'll have 2 accounts. I do and get 6mb on each, $30/month on
    each too, for less then the cost of one i get 2 and connect to my sonicwall
    TZ170W and with newsgroups i get 12mb download speed, :)
     
    ABS, Aug 30, 2005
    #4
  5. ABS wrote the following on 8/29/2005 9:23 PM:
    > "ITSO azionista" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>tRuthvalue wrote the following on 8/29/2005 8:14 PM:
    >>
    >>>I'm currently using Earthlink DSL and would like to switch to Comcast
    >>>Cable
    >>>Broadband. I currently rout my DSL to three computers using a LinkSys
    >>>Phoneline Router. My entire house is wired with pairs of TV coax, all
    >>>originating at the point of entry of the cable into the house. I would
    >>>think my coax would be faster than the phone lines and envision a cable
    >>>modem fed by the Comcast signal, and routed throughout my house over my
    >>>coax. A more technically savvy [than me] friend says I might be able to
    >>>utilize my Phoneline Router, and definitely can use a wireless setup or
    >>>4pair ethernet cabling with the Cable modem, but that I will not be able
    >>>to
    >>>take advantage of the fact that every room in my house has 2 [pairs] of
    >>>coax
    >>>outlets.
    >>>
    >>>Is this true, or is there some way I can use my cabling to distribute a
    >>>broadband signal throughout my house? If there are specific networking
    >>>products/adapters necessary, I would appreciate their names.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks...
    >>>--tRuth
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>Unfortunately, no matter how many coax terminals you have throughout your
    >>house, you only have one point of connectivity - the cable modem. From
    >>there is where you branch out using the RJ-45 ports or WAP on your router.
    >>
    >>Other than that, if you want more than one cable modem in your house, I
    >>believe you have to purchase static IPs, which are not cheap (at least
    >>from Comcast).
    >>
    >>Honestly, though, I've asked Comcast sales and Comcast technicians about
    >>multiple modems per household and I get a different answer each time.
    >>
    >>--
    >>The only easy day was yesterday.

    >
    >
    > Comcast doesn't sell static ips and have not for a very long time to non
    > business accounts.


    Which would mean you would have to purchase a business account... if it
    is supported in your location. It is supported in my location, so it was
    an option.

    > Also in order to use multiple modems you need one account
    > for each, it's fine, just ask them to bring out a new modem, provision it
    > online and you'll have 2 accounts. I do and get 6mb on each, $30/month on
    > each too, for less then the cost of one i get 2


    My Comcast account costs $49.50/month - which is less than $60.

    > and connect to my sonicwall
    > TZ170W and with newsgroups i get 12mb download speed, :)
    >
    >


    Are you using the Optional port (requires an upgrade to SonicOS
    Enhanced) for your second modem or do you just plug directly into one
    modem and use the SonicWall on the other?

    SonicWall TZ170s do not support multiple WANs out of the box - not even
    the unrestricted version, which lists for $869.
    http://www.sonicwallsales.com/product/view?item=01-SSC-5714&content=features


    --
    The only easy day was yesterday.
     
    ITSO azionista, Aug 30, 2005
    #5
  6. tRuthvalue

    Mitch Guest

    In article <1aQQe.3933$>, tRuthvalue <> wrote:


    > Is this true, or is there some way I can use my cabling to distribute a
    > broadband signal throughout my house?


    No, you wouldn't use the coax to network.
    But you can use the existing coax to pull new Ethernet through the walls.
    Depends a lot on how the coax was connected, if it is patched through a board or branched inside the walls, if the cable was tied or stapled inside, etc.
    But if it is simply laying inside, point-to-point, you might very easily run new Ethernet.

    Keep in mind that you might still like the coax around to run video.
    Personally, I'd rather have the house wired for the network than use wireless.
     
    Mitch, Aug 30, 2005
    #6
  7. tRuthvalue

    ABS Guest

    "ITSO azionista" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ABS wrote the following on 8/29/2005 9:23 PM:
    >> "ITSO azionista" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>>tRuthvalue wrote the following on 8/29/2005 8:14 PM:
    >>>
    >>>>I'm currently using Earthlink DSL and would like to switch to Comcast
    >>>>Cable
    >>>>Broadband. I currently rout my DSL to three computers using a LinkSys
    >>>>Phoneline Router. My entire house is wired with pairs of TV coax, all
    >>>>originating at the point of entry of the cable into the house. I would
    >>>>think my coax would be faster than the phone lines and envision a cable
    >>>>modem fed by the Comcast signal, and routed throughout my house over my
    >>>>coax. A more technically savvy [than me] friend says I might be able to
    >>>>utilize my Phoneline Router, and definitely can use a wireless setup or
    >>>>4pair ethernet cabling with the Cable modem, but that I will not be able
    >>>>to
    >>>>take advantage of the fact that every room in my house has 2 [pairs] of
    >>>>coax
    >>>>outlets.
    >>>>
    >>>>Is this true, or is there some way I can use my cabling to distribute a
    >>>>broadband signal throughout my house? If there are specific networking
    >>>>products/adapters necessary, I would appreciate their names.
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks...
    >>>>--tRuth
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Unfortunately, no matter how many coax terminals you have throughout your
    >>>house, you only have one point of connectivity - the cable modem. From
    >>>there is where you branch out using the RJ-45 ports or WAP on your
    >>>router.
    >>>
    >>>Other than that, if you want more than one cable modem in your house, I
    >>>believe you have to purchase static IPs, which are not cheap (at least
    >>>from Comcast).
    >>>
    >>>Honestly, though, I've asked Comcast sales and Comcast technicians about
    >>>multiple modems per household and I get a different answer each time.
    >>>
    >>>--
    >>>The only easy day was yesterday.

    >>
    >>
    >> Comcast doesn't sell static ips and have not for a very long time to non
    >> business accounts.

    >
    > Which would mean you would have to purchase a business account... if it is
    > supported in your location. It is supported in my location, so it was an
    > option.
    >
    >> Also in order to use multiple modems you need one account for each, it's
    >> fine, just ask them to bring out a new modem, provision it online and
    >> you'll have 2 accounts. I do and get 6mb on each, $30/month on each too,
    >> for less then the cost of one i get 2

    >
    > My Comcast account costs $49.50/month - which is less than $60.
    >
    >> and connect to my sonicwall TZ170W and with newsgroups i get 12mb
    >> download speed, :)

    >
    > Are you using the Optional port (requires an upgrade to SonicOS Enhanced)
    > for your second modem or do you just plug directly into one modem and use
    > the SonicWall on the other?
    >
    > SonicWall TZ170s do not support multiple WANs out of the box - not even
    > the unrestricted version, which lists for $869.
    > http://www.sonicwallsales.com/product/view?item=01-SSC-5714&content=features
    >
    >
    > --
    > The only easy day was yesterday.


    Yes, I am connecting both of my modems to the WAN port and the OPT port
    using SonicOS Enhanded. I was having problems with my TZ150, my reseller
    swapped it for me and gave me the TZ170W for a small difference in price,
    then gave me for free the SonicOS Enhanced. So I paid just barely over $100
    to have my 150 swapped for the TZ170W and got the SonicOS Enhanced free. The
    reseller was extremly nice with me about this giving me such a sweet deal.

    Since I already had full subscriptions for the Gateway AV, IPS, content
    filtering standard and the others, they just transferred to my 170W no
    problem once I regesiterred it.

    When I enable load balancing and choose round robin I get from
    www.newsreader.com 6mb each modem so in newsleecher www.newsleecher.com it
    shows 1500-1650kbytes/sec download speed. So does DU Meter. With newsreader
    as your NSP he allows with one account multiple ips at the same time. So I
    don't have to do anything special, just use 4 of his servers and 8
    connections each in newsleecher which then gives me 12mb download speed.
    Using the comcast giganews to get this I had to create a static router in
    the sonicwall because giganews doesn't let you connect from more then one ip
    at a time. so i forced port 119 through one modem and port 80 through
    another. then in newsleecher i would create 2 servers. i would log in with
    one newsgroups.comcast.net using 1 of my comcast accounts and say port 119
    for this, then for the second newsgroups.comcast.net i would use my second
    account and force port 80 on this one over the other modem. this way i am
    able to achieve 12mb performance downloading. I use 10 connections per
    server since giganews now allows 10 connections.

    I download a dvd now dvd5 in like 50 minutes now. dvd9 takes a little over
    an hr and a half about.
     
    ABS, Aug 30, 2005
    #7
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