Buying new digital camera

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jake29, Jun 29, 2013.

  1. Jake29

    David Taylor Guest

    On 02/07/2013 03:04, Robert Coe wrote:
    []
    > She bought a Nikon DSLR and only ONE battery for it??
    >
    > Bob


    I had been contemplating upgrading from my Nikon D5000 to the more
    recent D5200, but had been slightly put off by the different battery
    requirement. As it was a new battery, I knew that a Nikon spare would
    be quite costly, and that 3rd-party spares might not be available.
    When a UK on-line retailer offered a deal of camera with spare battery,
    I bought.

    On a recent trip with 5000 photos over about two weeks, I only recall
    changing the battery during the day once, if that. I do alternate
    batteries each day, and make sure that both are fully charged overnight.

    PS: I'm delighted with the D5200 - higher sensitivity and faster, more
    accurate focus. Menus are somewhat better, and the exposure display is
    improved as well. Well worth the upgrade, for me.
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Jul 2, 2013
    #61
    1. Advertising

  2. Jake29

    David Taylor Guest

    On 01/07/2013 22:42, nospam wrote:
    []
    > that's why i said go to a camera store first and see what's available,
    > then go to a big box store and use what you have learned while not
    > taking up a salesperson's time.


    If you've taken up the camera store's time, my feeling is that you
    should buy from them, or at least give them a chance to price-match.
    Otherwise, next time you want to browse at the camera store you may find
    it has gone out of business (like most here in Edinburgh have).
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Jul 2, 2013
    #62
    1. Advertising

  3. Jake29

    Martin Brown Guest

    On 01/07/2013 22:42, nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, Tony Cooper
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> An excellent place to check for fit and feel of a p&s and see how easy
    >> the menus are to go through. If the person wants information not
    >> available at Target, the selection can be reduced to just a couple of
    >> cameras and then go to the web reviews or a camera store.

    >
    > once you know what to look for in the menus, maybe.
    >
    > that's where a camera store helps, they can explain how to do stuff,
    > rather than a customer trying to guess their way through on their own.
    >
    > that's why i said go to a camera store first and see what's available,
    > then go to a big box store and use what you have learned while not
    > taking up a salesperson's time.


    That behaviour is *exactly* what kills photographic stores with skilled
    staff. If you waste their time and then go to a box shifter to buy it!

    Jessops failed in the UK recently and they were not bad (at least some
    of the stores I used were OK). Someone put up a poster by the door in
    their last week of trading. It said "Thank you for buying at Amazon".
    They would even do a price match deal if you asked them to. A handful of
    the more profitable ones have since reopened under new management - time
    will tell if they can garner enough sales volume to stay afloat.

    Bricks and mortar stores are doomed if Amazon parasitises all the sales
    that the stores would make by undercutting them at every opportunity.
    You can see people on their mobiles doing price comparisons all the time
    in bricks and mortar stores after wasting sales demo time.

    It is one thing to go in and play with a tethered camera for look and
    feel but quite another to tie up experienced sales staff pump and them
    for advice when you have no intention of buying kit from them.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown
    Martin Brown, Jul 2, 2013
    #63
  4. Jake29

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <%IwAt.50723$>,
    |||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk says...
    >
    > On 01/07/2013 22:42, nospam wrote:
    > > In article <>, Tony Cooper
    > > <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> An excellent place to check for fit and feel of a p&s and see how easy
    > >> the menus are to go through. If the person wants information not
    > >> available at Target, the selection can be reduced to just a couple of
    > >> cameras and then go to the web reviews or a camera store.

    > >
    > > once you know what to look for in the menus, maybe.
    > >
    > > that's where a camera store helps, they can explain how to do stuff,
    > > rather than a customer trying to guess their way through on their own.
    > >
    > > that's why i said go to a camera store first and see what's available,
    > > then go to a big box store and use what you have learned while not
    > > taking up a salesperson's time.

    >
    > That behaviour is *exactly* what kills photographic stores with skilled
    > staff. If you waste their time and then go to a box shifter to buy it!
    >
    > Jessops failed in the UK recently and they were not bad (at least some
    > of the stores I used were OK). Someone put up a poster by the door in
    > their last week of trading. It said "Thank you for buying at Amazon".
    > They would even do a price match deal if you asked them to. A handful of
    > the more profitable ones have since reopened under new management - time
    > will tell if they can garner enough sales volume to stay afloat.
    >
    > Bricks and mortar stores are doomed if Amazon parasitises all the sales
    > that the stores would make by undercutting them at every opportunity.
    > You can see people on their mobiles doing price comparisons all the time
    > in bricks and mortar stores after wasting sales demo time.
    >
    > It is one thing to go in and play with a tethered camera for look and
    > feel but quite another to tie up experienced sales staff pump and them
    > for advice when you have no intention of buying kit from them.


    And it is a third thing to look at the tethered camera then buy the same
    thing online for a lower price--keep doing that and after a while the
    box-shifter with the tethered cameras won't be there either.

    My general rule is that I have to actually see the thing or handle the
    thing before I buy it I'll buy it from whoever let me see it or handle
    it. If I already know all I wanted to know about it I'll buy it from
    the cheapest source I can find.
    J. Clarke, Jul 2, 2013
    #64
  5. Jake29

    Martin Brown Guest

    On 02/07/2013 03:07, Jake29 wrote:
    > "Jake29" <> wrote in message
    > news:kqneku$5ec$...
    >> I lost the digital camera that I had and I need to buy a new one.
    >>
    >> So, I am looking for suggestions of a new point-and-shoot digital
    >> camera. > I am looking for any suggestions that people here may have
    >> regarding which brand and model camera to buy.

    >
    > Thanks again to everyone for all of the good information.
    >


    > I have a hunch that I may end up buying two cameras rather than just
    > one. I'm thinking that I may buy a low-cost point-and-shoot camera that
    > I can easily carry around and use for everyday picture taking of rehab
    > work etc. And, I may also buy a camera like the Canon SX500 that I can
    > take to certain types of events etc. where I want to take better photos
    > and videos with more options like a long zoom and/or wide angle or
    > close-up photos etc. -- still not like a professional photographer would
    > want and would take, but better than the easy-carry point-and-shoot
    > camera could take.


    Don't assume that a professional photographer goes everywhere with a
    huge tripod and an oversized DSLR camera. Sometimes a smaller camera
    that you have with you always is more useful and much more unobtrusive.

    Plenty of mobile phones have respectable cameras built in these days
    although their performance in low light is usually lacking.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown
    Martin Brown, Jul 2, 2013
    #65
  6. On 7/2/2013 1:54 AM, Alfred Molon wrote:
    > In article <kqsqi1$egs$>, James Silverton
    > says...
    >> An optical viewfinder beats guessing at just what you are photographing
    >> in bright light.

    >
    > But you are not guessing - you are framing with the LCD
    > screen.
    >


    Not if the screen is mostly a gray blur.

    > Besides, there are no viewfinders for a 20x zoom compact
    > camera.
    >

    If there were a 20x zoom compact camera, I doubt it would be inexpensive
    or small.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
    James Silverton, Jul 2, 2013
    #66
  7. Jake29

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Tuesday, 2 July 2013 10:04:57 UTC+1, Martin Brown wrote:
    > On 01/07/2013 22:42, nospam wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>, Tony Cooper

    >
    > > <> wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > >> An excellent place to check for fit and feel of a p&s and see how easy

    >
    > >> the menus are to go through. If the person wants information not

    >
    > >> available at Target, the selection can be reduced to just a couple of

    >
    > >> cameras and then go to the web reviews or a camera store.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > once you know what to look for in the menus, maybe.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > that's where a camera store helps, they can explain how to do stuff,

    >
    > > rather than a customer trying to guess their way through on their own.


    One of the reasons I'll go into a store is to try for myself, see if I can work things out and use tehm for myself, if I can't then maybe the device is not for me. If I need help there should be someone nearby to help rather than hinder.
    This is especailly true if tere's a particular mode I want to investige.
    I might want a macro feature to be a one button press, but teh assiustant might need to show me which menu, sub-menu and setting I need to click while holding my breathe with my left hand at X postiton.


    > > that's why i said go to a camera store first and see what's available,

    >
    > > then go to a big box store and use what you have learned while not

    >
    > > taking up a salesperson's time.

    >
    >
    >
    > That behaviour is *exactly* what kills photographic stores with skilled
    >
    > staff. If you waste their time and then go to a box shifter to buy it!


    Yes that is rather unfair but who's fault is it.
    I don;t think Apple face this problem.


    > Jessops failed in the UK recently and they were not bad (at least some
    >
    > of the stores I used were OK). Someone put up a poster by the door in
    >
    > their last week of trading. It said "Thank you for buying at Amazon".
    >
    > They would even do a price match deal if you asked them to. A handful of
    >
    > the more profitable ones have since reopened under new management - time
    >
    > will tell if they can garner enough sales volume to stay afloat.
    >
    >
    >
    > Bricks and mortar stores are doomed if Amazon parasitises all the sales
    >
    > that the stores would make by undercutting them at every opportunity.


    But whose fault is it, how can amazon sell so cheaply, it's the greed of the manufacuters (and of course amazon get away without paying the correct tax too).

    I don;t think Aple see amazon as a price cuuting threat.
    Maybe if canon, nikon and anyone didn;t try to box shift to amazon perhaps they'd make more profit.


    > You can see people on their mobiles doing price comparisons all the time
    >
    > in bricks and mortar stores after wasting sales demo time.


    it musty be frustrating


    > It is one thing to go in and play with a tethered camera for look and
    >
    > feel but quite another to tie up experienced sales staff pump and them
    >
    > for advice when you have no intention of buying kit from them.


    Or you have every intentiion but the camera hasn't a SD card or a battery in it.
    if I was prepared to buy a camera in a store I'd at least expect to be able to take a photo and blow it up on a large monitor else I'll use pdreview like anyone else, and buy on-line. ;-)
    Whisky-dave, Jul 2, 2013
    #67
  8. Jake29

    PeterN Guest

    On 7/2/2013 3:26 AM, David Taylor wrote:
    > On 01/07/2013 22:42, nospam wrote:
    > []
    >> that's why i said go to a camera store first and see what's available,
    >> then go to a big box store and use what you have learned while not
    >> taking up a salesperson's time.

    >
    > If you've taken up the camera store's time, my feeling is that you
    > should buy from them, or at least give them a chance to price-match.
    > Otherwise, next time you want to browse at the camera store you may find
    > it has gone out of business (like most here in Edinburgh have).


    What some don't realize is that the small camera store is part of the
    community. The good ones give you service, so you may expect to pay a
    little more.
    Similarly, the owners of the small businesses, and not just nameless
    people. I try to do as much business as possible with them. A few months
    ago a clumsy idiot (me) broke a lighting fixture. My wife used it as an
    excuse to change several of them. We went to a local store, she sketched
    what she wanted, and two weeks later the fixtures were ready. That just
    doesn't happen in the Home Depots.

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jul 2, 2013
    #68
  9. Jake29

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Tony Cooper
    <> wrote:

    > >> I was in Target on Friday, and all their demo/display cameras were in
    > >> anti-theft holders, on retractable cables and hooked up to a power
    > >> supply system.
    > >> ...and they had a good 60+ cameras to choose from.

    > >
    > >i was in best buy earlier today because it was next door to another
    > >store i was going to, and took a look at the camera section.
    > >
    > >they were on tethers, but i'd estimate about 20-25% were non-functional
    > >in one way or another, either missing batteries, no sd card

    >
    > I don't recall ever seeing a display camera with a SD card. It's
    > kinda pointless because the SD card preserves the image taken and
    > would have to be formatted by the clerks after use. I don't think, if
    > I ran the store, I'd want images preserved for the next customer to
    > see. I wouldn't want some customer taking photographs of small kids
    > in the store and leaving them around.
    >
    > An SD card in a demo camera in a big box store is inviting theft since
    > they can be easily palmed. Why anyone would bother is beyond me, but
    > people do strange things.


    true but many cameras don't take photos without a card so the user
    won't be inadvertently taking photos that aren't saved. some have an
    option to disable that ('demo mode'), but how many customers are going
    to know where that for each camera?

    if you don't know how to do that, then the camera is rather crippled.
    you can see how it fits in your hand and zoom the lens and poke around
    in the menus, but you can't take any photos, unless you happen to find
    the proper setting, if there is one.
    nospam, Jul 2, 2013
    #69
  10. Jake29

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Tony Cooper
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> >the way you described it, with leaving the batteries out from the
    > >> >> >display cameras, is not a way to win customers. that's why i said they
    > >> >> >won't last long.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> The behind-the-counter cameras are there without batteries. There are
    > >> >> no on-counter cameras. When the customer is handed a display camera,
    > >> >> the battery is added. Sometimes there is a delay because the needed
    > >> >> batteries are in use by another clerk, but the potential buyer of a
    > >> >> higher-end DSLR is not put off by this.
    > >> >
    > >> >what's the point in that? who is going to steal a battery from a camera
    > >> >behind the counter? that just adds an unnecessary delay.
    > >>
    > >> The reason is not to prevent theft of batteries. The reason is to
    > >> devote just a few batteries to demonstration use and to be able to
    > >> keep those batteries fully-charged. Six demo cameras require six
    > >> batteries in use, but this store's system requires fewer than six and
    > >> they can be kept fully-charged. You pointed out in another post that
    > >> big box store display units often have flat batteries. The store
    > >> doesn't use a tether system, so the cameras have to be
    > >> battery-powered.

    > >
    > >theft by whom? if the cameras are behind the counter and only shown to
    > >customers by staff, then who exactly is going to steal a battery?
    > >

    > What? I just said it *isn't* about theft.


    true. i misread it.

    however, what you describe is even worse. are they that cheap they
    can't afford one battery per camera?

    the store could be having financial difficulties.

    > >> >anyway, those who are put off by that practice don't bother showing up
    > >> >in the first place.
    > >>
    > >> What? If they don't show up in the first place, how would they know
    > >> about the practice? Great thinking there, nospam.

    > >
    > >maybe their friends told them of the stupid practices. or maybe they
    > >stopped in one day,

    >
    > That's showing up in the first place.
    >
    > > saw what's going on and then left.
    > >
    > >as you said in the other thread, exact wording doesn't matter. except
    > >when all you do is want to argue.


    like i said, nitpick is all you can do.
    nospam, Jul 2, 2013
    #70
  11. Jake29

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Tony Cooper
    <> wrote:

    > I also went to the Apple store in the mall to look at iPads. The help
    > there was like car salesmen waiting to pounce. I was barely in the
    > door when clerks approached me. The clerk I worked with was quite
    > knowledgeable, but kept showing me things his iPhone could do and how
    > those apps(?) could be downloaded for the iPad. He spent far too much
    > time (for me) in going on about things I could do that I had no
    > interest in doing. He was knowledgeable, but not much of a listener.
    > I kept telling him I had no interest in downloading music or movies,
    > but he insisted on going through a whole spiel on it.
    >
    > We're all different, and I don't like to be smothered by a sales
    > clerk. Some may like that extra service, but I don't.


    there's a greeter that asks what you need who then gets the right
    person to help you, but if you don't want to be bothered talking to
    anyone, they'll let you play with the equipment for as long as you
    want.

    > I bought the iPad from Best Buy. The only problem I had with the
    > clerk was that he pushed too hard for the extra warranty policy or
    > whatever it is called.


    there's a huge profit with extended warranties, so they push hard on
    them.

    hopefully you didn't buy their warranty, since one, ipads are very
    reliable and don't need it, and two, applecare is much better than best
    buy's plan, should you want an extended warranty at all. plus the apple
    store has a *lot* of flexibility in fixing things that best buy just
    can't do.
    nospam, Jul 2, 2013
    #71
  12. Jake29

    nospam Guest

    In article <kqtv12$nm3$>, David Taylor
    <> wrote:

    > > that's why i said go to a camera store first and see what's available,
    > > then go to a big box store and use what you have learned while not
    > > taking up a salesperson's time.

    >
    > If you've taken up the camera store's time, my feeling is that you
    > should buy from them, or at least give them a chance to price-match.


    true, but chances are they can't match it because they can't buy it as
    cheap as b&h and the like can.

    i don't mind paying a little more for local service but not a couple
    hundred dollars.

    and going to a big box store wastes nobody's time.

    > Otherwise, next time you want to browse at the camera store you may find
    > it has gone out of business (like most here in Edinburgh have).


    they have to do something to justify their prices. otherwise, people
    will buy online for less.
    nospam, Jul 2, 2013
    #72
  13. Jake29

    nospam Guest

    In article <%IwAt.50723$>, Martin Brown
    <|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote:

    > >> An excellent place to check for fit and feel of a p&s and see how easy
    > >> the menus are to go through. If the person wants information not
    > >> available at Target, the selection can be reduced to just a couple of
    > >> cameras and then go to the web reviews or a camera store.

    > >
    > > once you know what to look for in the menus, maybe.
    > >
    > > that's where a camera store helps, they can explain how to do stuff,
    > > rather than a customer trying to guess their way through on their own.
    > >
    > > that's why i said go to a camera store first and see what's available,
    > > then go to a big box store and use what you have learned while not
    > > taking up a salesperson's time.

    >
    > That behaviour is *exactly* what kills photographic stores with skilled
    > staff. If you waste their time and then go to a box shifter to buy it!


    nope. what kills stores is not offering added value for the higher
    prices they charge.

    and the difference isn't always minor. i've seen differences of several
    hundred dollars. a store would need to do a *lot* to make up for that.

    > Jessops failed in the UK recently and they were not bad (at least some
    > of the stores I used were OK). Someone put up a poster by the door in
    > their last week of trading. It said "Thank you for buying at Amazon".
    > They would even do a price match deal if you asked them to. A handful of
    > the more profitable ones have since reopened under new management - time
    > will tell if they can garner enough sales volume to stay afloat.
    >
    > Bricks and mortar stores are doomed if Amazon parasitises all the sales
    > that the stores would make by undercutting them at every opportunity.
    > You can see people on their mobiles doing price comparisons all the time
    > in bricks and mortar stores after wasting sales demo time.


    unless stores offer something more than handing you product in exchange
    for payment, their day has come.

    online offers a *much* bigger selection, lower prices and more
    convenience.

    > It is one thing to go in and play with a tethered camera for look and
    > feel but quite another to tie up experienced sales staff pump and them
    > for advice when you have no intention of buying kit from them.


    that's why i said to only do that to find out a little about the
    products, then go to the big box store to do the actual playing with
    the models.

    someone might be lost starting from ground zero at a big box store,
    trying to figure out what was what, how to configure them (the menus
    are all different, buttons labeled differently, etc.)
    nospam, Jul 2, 2013
    #73
  14. Jake29

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Tue, 02 Jul 2013 10:36:48 -0400, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, Tony Cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> I also went to the Apple store in the mall to look at iPads. The help
    >> there was like car salesmen waiting to pounce. I was barely in the
    >> door when clerks approached me. The clerk I worked with was quite
    >> knowledgeable, but kept showing me things his iPhone could do and how
    >> those apps(?) could be downloaded for the iPad. He spent far too much
    >> time (for me) in going on about things I could do that I had no
    >> interest in doing. He was knowledgeable, but not much of a listener.
    >> I kept telling him I had no interest in downloading music or movies,
    >> but he insisted on going through a whole spiel on it.
    >>
    >> We're all different, and I don't like to be smothered by a sales
    >> clerk. Some may like that extra service, but I don't.

    >
    >there's a greeter that asks what you need who then gets the right
    >person to help you,


    That wasn't the case in my visit. The "greeter" was the one who went
    over the iPads with me.

    > but if you don't want to be bothered talking to
    >anyone, they'll let you play with the equipment for as long as you
    >want.


    I want some assistance, but not the excessive assistance that was
    provided there. I fully realize that individuals are different, and
    another clerk might have been more tolerable to me. Most of all, I
    want someone who will listen to *my* questions and respond to them and
    not rattle on about what they think I want to know.

    I don't think that what I experience was indicative of Apple store
    people at all. I would avoid that person if I go back, but it's an
    individual thing, not a corporate thing. Also, customers are
    different. I am less tolerant of smothering clerks than some might
    be. The next customer that that person I dealt with deals with might
    think he does a wonderful job.


    >> I bought the iPad from Best Buy. The only problem I had with the
    >> clerk was that he pushed too hard for the extra warranty policy or
    >> whatever it is called.

    >
    >there's a huge profit with extended warranties, so they push hard on
    >them.
    >
    >hopefully you didn't buy their warranty,


    Of course not.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
    Tony Cooper, Jul 2, 2013
    #74
  15. Jake29

    Sandman Guest

    In article <020720131036512868%>,
    nospam <> wrote:

    > > > once you know what to look for in the menus, maybe.
    > > >
    > > > that's where a camera store helps, they can explain how to do stuff,
    > > > rather than a customer trying to guess their way through on their own.
    > > >
    > > > that's why i said go to a camera store first and see what's available,
    > > > then go to a big box store and use what you have learned while not
    > > > taking up a salesperson's time.

    > >
    > > That behaviour is *exactly* what kills photographic stores with skilled
    > > staff. If you waste their time and then go to a box shifter to buy it!

    >
    > nope. what kills stores is not offering added value for the higher
    > prices they charge.


    Well, for what its worth - that "skilled staff" is the added value I
    miss now that the large super stores have killed off the small players.

    And it's not just camera stores, of course.


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Jul 2, 2013
    #75
  16. Jake29

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Sandman
    <> wrote:

    > > > That behaviour is *exactly* what kills photographic stores with skilled
    > > > staff. If you waste their time and then go to a box shifter to buy it!

    > >
    > > nope. what kills stores is not offering added value for the higher
    > > prices they charge.

    >
    > Well, for what its worth - that "skilled staff" is the added value I
    > miss now that the large super stores have killed off the small players.


    sometimes it's worth it. sometimes not.

    people can get a *lot* of information online, probably much more than
    any salesperson could offer.

    plus, they want to make a sale, so they're not going to tell you about
    everything, especially stuff they don't carry.

    > And it's not just camera stores, of course.


    true.
    nospam, Jul 2, 2013
    #76
  17. Jake29

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > On 7/2/2013 3:26 AM, David Taylor wrote:
    > > On 01/07/2013 22:42, nospam wrote:
    > > []
    > >> that's why i said go to a camera store first and see what's available,
    > >> then go to a big box store and use what you have learned while not
    > >> taking up a salesperson's time.

    > >
    > > If you've taken up the camera store's time, my feeling is that you
    > > should buy from them, or at least give them a chance to price-match.
    > > Otherwise, next time you want to browse at the camera store you may find
    > > it has gone out of business (like most here in Edinburgh have).

    >
    > What some don't realize is that the small camera store is part of the
    > community. The good ones give you service, so you may expect to pay a
    > little more.
    > Similarly, the owners of the small businesses, and not just nameless
    > people. I try to do as much business as possible with them. A few months
    > ago a clumsy idiot (me) broke a lighting fixture. My wife used it as an
    > excuse to change several of them. We went to a local store, she sketched
    > what she wanted, and two weeks later the fixtures were ready. That just
    > doesn't happen in the Home Depots.


    Really depends on need though. There's a local hardware store here that
    has just about anything one can ask of a hardware store. I give them my
    business whenever I can, but when the toilet's flooding the basement on
    a Sunday, Home Depot gets the buy.
    J. Clarke, Jul 2, 2013
    #77
  18. Jake29

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <kqufeb$thd$>,
    says...
    >
    > On 7/2/2013 1:54 AM, Alfred Molon wrote:
    > > In article <kqsqi1$egs$>, James Silverton
    > > says...
    > >> An optical viewfinder beats guessing at just what you are photographing
    > >> in bright light.

    > >
    > > But you are not guessing - you are framing with the LCD
    > > screen.
    > >

    >
    > Not if the screen is mostly a gray blur.
    >
    > > Besides, there are no viewfinders for a 20x zoom compact
    > > camera.
    > >

    > If there were a 20x zoom compact camera, I doubt it would be inexpensive
    > or small.


    The SX500 has a 30x zoom, sells for under $200, and dpreview lists it as
    a "compact" but it's not really pocket size. The Nikon S9500, Canon
    SX240HS, and Panasonic ZS20 are under 4.5x2.5 and about 1.3" thick which
    makes them pretty pocketable--they have 20x zoom and the Canon goes for
    $220 right now. The Sony HX50V is in the same general category, "travel
    zooms" but it's 30X, and a little thicker at 1.5 inch--it's more
    expensive though at 400 bucks, but it takes the same auxiliary eye-level
    finder as the RX-1--that finder costs as much as the camera though.
    J. Clarke, Jul 2, 2013
    #78
  19. Jake29

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Tuesday, 2 July 2013 15:36:49 UTC+1, nospam wrote:
    > In article <kqtv12$nm3$>, David Taylor
    >
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > > that's why i said go to a camera store first and see what's available,

    >
    > > > then go to a big box store and use what you have learned while not

    >
    > > > taking up a salesperson's time.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > If you've taken up the camera store's time, my feeling is that you

    >
    > > should buy from them, or at least give them a chance to price-match.

    >
    >
    >
    > true, but chances are they can't match it because they can't buy it as
    >
    > cheap as b&h and the like can.


    Do ou happen to know what sort of prices a particulr camera might be sold to and for.

    As an exmple say canon sell a camera to amazon for $500 and amazon sell it for $525... What would canon sell it to B&H at or bestbuy for.

    I;'ts just that I don;lt seem Apple products hugely discounted on amazon or elsewhere and teyhy seem to be making a profit from a bricks and mortar store as do other shoips that sell Apple stuff for almost the same price as the Apple store or on-line.



    > i don't mind paying a little more for local service but not a couple
    >
    > hundred dollars.


    yes one does wonder why the differnce is so large.


    > and going to a big box store wastes nobody's time.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Otherwise, next time you want to browse at the camera store you may find

    >
    > > it has gone out of business (like most here in Edinburgh have).

    >
    >
    >
    > they have to do something to justify their prices. otherwise, people
    >
    > will buy online for less.


    Diffiult because this has to be seen as valuable to the buyer and for most people value = money.
    Whisky-dave, Jul 2, 2013
    #79
  20. Jake29

    Sandman Guest

    In article <020720131152184536%>,
    nospam <> wrote:

    > > > > That behaviour is *exactly* what kills photographic stores with skilled
    > > > > staff. If you waste their time and then go to a box shifter to buy it!
    > > >
    > > > nope. what kills stores is not offering added value for the higher
    > > > prices they charge.

    > >
    > > Well, for what its worth - that "skilled staff" is the added value I
    > > miss now that the large super stores have killed off the small players.

    >
    > sometimes it's worth it. sometimes not.
    >
    > people can get a *lot* of information online, probably much more than
    > any salesperson could offer.


    Well, people *can*, but they're too lazy to do it. Proper research is
    what people could avoid by talking to the local camera shop.

    > plus, they want to make a sale, so they're not going to tell you about
    > everything, especially stuff they don't carry.


    That's true for the big super stores, not for the local merchants.
    They're happy to order any gear you want or need. They don't have huge
    specials on a specific gear that they will nag on you to get because
    that's where they get the biggest payoff. They value you as a customer
    and know that your loyalty is worth more than 5% margins on cheap gear.

    My local camera/computer/stereo guys has always bent over backwards to
    do proper research, find the best gear for my needs and kept in touch to
    see that I'm still happy with the purchase. You just don't get that from
    MediaMarkt (our Best Buy when it comes to electronic gear), where
    customer loyalty isn't worth as much because they have so many customers.

    There is a place for everything, and I din't mind the competition, but I
    think it's sad when customers would rather save $10 than buy from a
    small dealer that knows what he's doing, which mans that he have to
    close shop.


    --
    Sandman[.net]
    Sandman, Jul 2, 2013
    #80
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