Buying new digital camera

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jake29, Jun 29, 2013.

  1. Jake29

    Jake29 Guest

    I lost the digital camera that I had and I need to buy a new one.

    The one I had was a Kodak-something (I forget the model number), and the one
    that I had before that was a Kodak EasyShare V1253. I lost the last one
    and the V1253 died on me for some reason.

    Both cameras were point-and-shoot digital cameras. Both had fairly high
    megapixels and a fairly high zoom. What I liked about both of them is that
    they both had rechargeable Li-Ion batteries that lasted a long time on each
    charge -- a feature that I definitely want.

    It looks like Kodak is out of the digital camera business, so apparently I
    can't buy another Kodak digital camera. If I could, I would.

    So, I am looking for suggestions of a new point-and-shoot digital camera. I
    definitely don't want one that uses AA batteries (rechargeable or not) as
    many of them seem to do these days -- I want one with a rechargeable Li-Ion
    battery.

    I like the plain flat version of digital cameras that I can just keep in my
    pocket; not the bigger size cameras that are out there. I am expecting the
    cost to be less that about $200. If it has the right battery type
    (rechargeable Li-Ion), a fairly high megapixel rating, and a fairly high
    optical zoom, that would be great.

    I don't do any fancy or professional picture taking -- mostly just people
    and events that I go to (birthday parties, etc.). I do use a camera a lot
    for taking photos of construction work in progress while rehabbing
    properties that I own -- to record wiring, plumbing, etc. before the walls
    are closed up etc.

    I am looking for any suggestions that people here may have regarding which
    brand and model camera to buy.

    I will read all replies and will follow up here with more info etc. if
    needed.

    Thanks.
    Jake29, Jun 29, 2013
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Jake29

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 16:04:52 -0400, "Jake29" <>
    wrote:

    >I lost the digital camera that I had and I need to buy a new one.
    >
    >The one I had was a Kodak-something (I forget the model number), and the one
    >that I had before that was a Kodak EasyShare V1253. I lost the last one
    >and the V1253 died on me for some reason.
    >
    >Both cameras were point-and-shoot digital cameras. Both had fairly high
    >megapixels and a fairly high zoom. What I liked about both of them is that
    >they both had rechargeable Li-Ion batteries that lasted a long time on each
    >charge -- a feature that I definitely want.
    >
    >It looks like Kodak is out of the digital camera business, so apparently I
    >can't buy another Kodak digital camera. If I could, I would.
    >
    >So, I am looking for suggestions of a new point-and-shoot digital camera. I
    >definitely don't want one that uses AA batteries (rechargeable or not) as
    >many of them seem to do these days -- I want one with a rechargeable Li-Ion
    >battery.
    >
    >I like the plain flat version of digital cameras that I can just keep in my
    >pocket; not the bigger size cameras that are out there. I am expecting the
    >cost to be less that about $200. If it has the right battery type
    >(rechargeable Li-Ion), a fairly high megapixel rating, and a fairly high
    >optical zoom, that would be great.
    >
    >I don't do any fancy or professional picture taking -- mostly just people
    >and events that I go to (birthday parties, etc.). I do use a camera a lot
    >for taking photos of construction work in progress while rehabbing
    >properties that I own -- to record wiring, plumbing, etc. before the walls
    >are closed up etc.
    >
    >I am looking for any suggestions that people here may have regarding which
    >brand and model camera to buy.
    >
    >I will read all replies and will follow up here with more info etc. if
    >needed.


    My suggestion is to go to a store like Best Buy, Target, Wal-Mart, etc
    where they have a row of point-and-shoots for you to choose from.
    Don't go to a camera store where the clerk has to pull each out for
    you to examine.

    Handle all of the Nikon and Canon point-and-shoots (they are the two
    brands with the most models in the price range you describe) and
    determine which one(s) fit your hand and your pocket. Operate the
    controls to see which one is easiest for you to view the menus and
    change the settings. Make sure the shutter release and menu controls
    are in a position that makes it easy for you to use.

    Make sure the zoom control is smooth and easy for you to use. You
    should only be concerned about the *optical* zoom. The *digital* zoom
    is practically worthless. Labels will mislead you. Some cameras brag
    about total zoom, but include the digital zoom in that figure. Look
    closer at just the optical zoom figure.

    I disagree with your preference about AA batteries, but it's your
    camera and your money. My in-the-car point-and-shoot (my regular
    camera is a Nikon DSLR) uses rechargeable AA batteries and shoots RAW
    and has manual settings. I like the idea that if I haven't used it
    for a while, and the batteries are flat, I can buy regular AA
    batteries at any store and use them. If my Nikon Li-Ion battery goes
    flat, I have to go home to charge it. (Well, *I* don't, but I have
    three batteries and always carry charged spares.)

    With the features you want, there's not an eyelash's difference
    between similarly priced Nikon and Canon point-and-shoots. You aren't
    looking for RAW, manual controls, or other bells and whistles.
    There are other brands that are equal to Nikon and Canon, but I'm
    trying to keep it simple here.

    The way the camera fits your hand, and the ease of use for you, are
    more important considerations than brand and model.

    The camera makers are always coming out with new models, and stores
    like to move out discontinued models. I recently purchased a Nikon
    point-and-shoot for $99 at H.H. Gregg that had sold the week before
    for over $200. I gave it to a relative. Replacement parts aren't a
    consideration, so discontinued models are worth buying.

    About megapixels...most of the cameras you'll see are about the same
    in models in the same price range. But, big megapixel numbers are
    really only important to people who want to make large prints. The
    difference between a 12 megapixel camera and a 24 megapixel camera
    will not been seen in a 4" x 6" print. On a computer screen, not even
    discernable. Megapixel numbers ceased to be important for the
    point-and-shoot user once all cameras started offering over 4 or 5
    megapixels unless the intent is to print posters.














    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
    Tony Cooper, Jun 29, 2013
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Jake29

    Jake29 Guest

    "Tony Cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    >> On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 16:04:52 -0400, "Jake29" <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>So, I am looking for suggestions of a new point-and-shoot digital camera.
    >>I
    >>definitely don't want one that uses AA batteries (rechargeable or not) as
    >>many of them seem to do these days -- I want one with a rechargeable
    >>Li-Ion
    >>battery.
    >>
    >>I am looking for any suggestions that people here may have regarding which
    >>brand and model camera to buy.


    > My suggestion is to go to a store like Best Buy, Target, Wal-Mart, etc
    > where they have a row of point-and-shoots for you to choose from.
    > Don't go to a camera store where the clerk has to pull each out for
    > you to examine.
    >
    > Handle all of the Nikon and Canon point-and-shoots (they are the two
    > brands with the most models in the price range you describe) and
    > determine which one(s) fit your hand and your pocket. Operate the
    > controls to see which one is easiest for you to view the menus and
    > change the settings. Make sure the shutter release and menu controls
    > are in a position that makes it easy for you to use.
    >
    > Make sure the zoom control is smooth and easy for you to use. You
    > should only be concerned about the *optical* zoom. The *digital* zoom
    > is practically worthless. Labels will mislead you. Some cameras brag
    > about total zoom, but include the digital zoom in that figure. Look
    > closer at just the optical zoom figure.
    >
    > I disagree with your preference about AA batteries, but it's your
    > camera and your money. My in-the-car point-and-shoot (my regular
    > camera is a Nikon DSLR) uses rechargeable AA batteries and shoots RAW
    > and has manual settings. I like the idea that if I haven't used it
    > for a while, and the batteries are flat, I can buy regular AA
    > batteries at any store and use them. If my Nikon Li-Ion battery goes
    > flat, I have to go home to charge it. (Well, *I* don't, but I have
    > three batteries and always carry charged spares.)
    >
    > With the features you want, there's not an eyelash's difference
    > between similarly priced Nikon and Canon point-and-shoots. You aren't
    > looking for RAW, manual controls, or other bells and whistles.
    > There are other brands that are equal to Nikon and Canon, but I'm
    > trying to keep it simple here.
    >
    > The way the camera fits your hand, and the ease of use for you, are
    > more important considerations than brand and model.
    >
    > The camera makers are always coming out with new models, and stores
    > like to move out discontinued models. I recently purchased a Nikon
    > point-and-shoot for $99 at H.H. Gregg that had sold the week before
    > for over $200. I gave it to a relative. Replacement parts aren't a
    > consideration, so discontinued models are worth buying.
    >
    > About megapixels...most of the cameras you'll see are about the same
    > in models in the same price range. But, big megapixel numbers are
    > really only important to people who want to make large prints. The
    > difference between a 12 megapixel camera and a 24 megapixel camera
    > will not been seen in a 4" x 6" print. On a computer screen, not even
    > discernable. Megapixel numbers ceased to be important for the
    > point-and-shoot user once all cameras started offering over 4 or 5
    > megapixels unless the intent is to print posters.


    Thanks. That's a ton of great information.

    I'll do what you suggested about going to places like Best Buy, Target, etc.
    I did go to WalMart and the cameras were all chained down, so I couldn't
    really figure out which cameras had which features and what type of battery
    they used etc. But, I'll try the other stores.

    I did notice that the descriptions talk about optical zoom and digital zoom,
    so now I know to just focus on the optical zoom part.

    Part of why I am interested in higher megapixels is that I sometimes take
    photos of a high part of a building or a chimney etc. that needs work, but
    from ground level. Then, when I get the photos on my computer, I can zoom
    in and see more detail about the condition of the chimney etc. I don't know
    if higher megapixels really makes a difference in my being able to do that,
    but with the cameras that I had in the past that was a great feature.

    One other thing that I sometimes need to do is take pictures of rooms (like
    a bathroom or kitchen) that has been remodeled, and it would be good to be
    able to take a wider angle shot if possible to get more of the room in one
    picture. I have seen cameras that say "wide angle", but after reading more
    about some of that, it appears that the only truly "wide angle" cameras are
    the higher end ones that are not "point and shoot". But, I thought I'd
    mention that in case there is anything I should look for in terms of "wide
    angle" on the point and shoot cameras.
    Jake29, Jun 30, 2013
    #3
  4. Jake29

    Jake29 Guest

    "newshound" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 29/06/2013 21:54, Tony Cooper wrote:
    >> On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 16:04:52 -0400, "Jake29" <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I lost the digital camera that I had and I need to buy a new one.


    > All excellent advice from Tony, the only thing I would add is that I
    > wouldn't buy anything without a viewfinder. Firstly, you can hold the
    > camera much more securely with two hands and against your face than
    > holding it some distance in front of you while looking at the screen.
    > Secondly, you'll have no trouble framing your shot in sunlight or
    > otherwise awkward lighting conditions.
    >
    > Last time I looked this restricted you to one or two Canons at the budget
    > end of the market.


    Thanks. I'll definitely look for that about the viewfinder. I know exactly
    what you mean about keeping the camera stable and being able to see what I
    am trying to photograph on a sunny day without a viewfinder. I do get that
    the viewfinder feature may just be in higher end cameras but I'll look for
    that anyway and see what's out there.
    Jake29, Jun 30, 2013
    #4
  5. Jake29

    nospam Guest

    In article <kqo1uk$fp7$>, Jake29
    <> wrote:

    > > My suggestion is to go to a store like Best Buy, Target, Wal-Mart, etc
    > > where they have a row of point-and-shoots for you to choose from.
    > > Don't go to a camera store where the clerk has to pull each out for
    > > you to examine.


    > I'll do what you suggested about going to places like Best Buy, Target, etc.
    > I did go to WalMart and the cameras were all chained down, so I couldn't
    > really figure out which cameras had which features and what type of battery
    > they used etc. But, I'll try the other stores.


    it's actually bad advice.

    first, go to a camera store and talk to a salesperson who has a
    reasonable understanding of the various models. you want someone with a
    clue, which you will *not* find in a big box store, to answer any
    questions you may have. some camera stores are better than others, so
    try to find a store that caters towards pros rather than a mall store.

    once you have an idea of the various models and the different features
    available, *then* go to a big box store where you can play with them
    for as long as you want without bothering a salesperson.

    keep in mind that a lot of times, the cameras at a big box store will
    not work properly or have dead batteries or some other issue and nobody
    there really cares one way or the other.

    > I did notice that the descriptions talk about optical zoom and digital zoom,
    > so now I know to just focus on the optical zoom part.


    ignore digital zoom. it's nothing that can't be done on a computer.

    > Part of why I am interested in higher megapixels is that I sometimes take
    > photos of a high part of a building or a chimney etc. that needs work, but
    > from ground level. Then, when I get the photos on my computer, I can zoom
    > in and see more detail about the condition of the chimney etc. I don't know
    > if higher megapixels really makes a difference in my being able to do that,
    > but with the cameras that I had in the past that was a great feature.


    sounds like you want a longer focus lens for that.

    > One other thing that I sometimes need to do is take pictures of rooms (like
    > a bathroom or kitchen) that has been remodeled, and it would be good to be
    > able to take a wider angle shot if possible to get more of the room in one
    > picture. I have seen cameras that say "wide angle", but after reading more
    > about some of that, it appears that the only truly "wide angle" cameras are
    > the higher end ones that are not "point and shoot". But, I thought I'd
    > mention that in case there is anything I should look for in terms of "wide
    > angle" on the point and shoot cameras.


    then you also need a wide angle lens.

    most p&s cameras won't go that wide, but some may have accessory lenses
    to go wider. unfortunately, those aren't usually of the best quality.

    if you really need to do interior shots with a very wide angle lens,
    you really don't want a p&s compact. a much better choice is something
    with interchangeable lenses, either an slr or a mirrorless.
    nospam, Jun 30, 2013
    #5
  6. Jake29

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 21:34:16 -0400, "Jake29" <>
    wrote:

    >"Tony Cooper" <> wrote in message
    >news:p...
    >>> On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 16:04:52 -0400, "Jake29" <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>So, I am looking for suggestions of a new point-and-shoot digital camera.
    >>>I
    >>>definitely don't want one that uses AA batteries (rechargeable or not) as
    >>>many of them seem to do these days -- I want one with a rechargeable
    >>>Li-Ion
    >>>battery.
    >>>
    >>>I am looking for any suggestions that people here may have regarding which
    >>>brand and model camera to buy.

    >
    >> My suggestion is to go to a store like Best Buy, Target, Wal-Mart, etc
    >> where they have a row of point-and-shoots for you to choose from.
    >> Don't go to a camera store where the clerk has to pull each out for
    >> you to examine.
    >>
    >> Handle all of the Nikon and Canon point-and-shoots (they are the two
    >> brands with the most models in the price range you describe) and
    >> determine which one(s) fit your hand and your pocket. Operate the
    >> controls to see which one is easiest for you to view the menus and
    >> change the settings. Make sure the shutter release and menu controls
    >> are in a position that makes it easy for you to use.
    >>
    >> Make sure the zoom control is smooth and easy for you to use. You
    >> should only be concerned about the *optical* zoom. The *digital* zoom
    >> is practically worthless. Labels will mislead you. Some cameras brag
    >> about total zoom, but include the digital zoom in that figure. Look
    >> closer at just the optical zoom figure.
    >>
    >> I disagree with your preference about AA batteries, but it's your
    >> camera and your money. My in-the-car point-and-shoot (my regular
    >> camera is a Nikon DSLR) uses rechargeable AA batteries and shoots RAW
    >> and has manual settings. I like the idea that if I haven't used it
    >> for a while, and the batteries are flat, I can buy regular AA
    >> batteries at any store and use them. If my Nikon Li-Ion battery goes
    >> flat, I have to go home to charge it. (Well, *I* don't, but I have
    >> three batteries and always carry charged spares.)
    >>
    >> With the features you want, there's not an eyelash's difference
    >> between similarly priced Nikon and Canon point-and-shoots. You aren't
    >> looking for RAW, manual controls, or other bells and whistles.
    >> There are other brands that are equal to Nikon and Canon, but I'm
    >> trying to keep it simple here.
    >>
    >> The way the camera fits your hand, and the ease of use for you, are
    >> more important considerations than brand and model.
    >>
    >> The camera makers are always coming out with new models, and stores
    >> like to move out discontinued models. I recently purchased a Nikon
    >> point-and-shoot for $99 at H.H. Gregg that had sold the week before
    >> for over $200. I gave it to a relative. Replacement parts aren't a
    >> consideration, so discontinued models are worth buying.
    >>
    >> About megapixels...most of the cameras you'll see are about the same
    >> in models in the same price range. But, big megapixel numbers are
    >> really only important to people who want to make large prints. The
    >> difference between a 12 megapixel camera and a 24 megapixel camera
    >> will not been seen in a 4" x 6" print. On a computer screen, not even
    >> discernable. Megapixel numbers ceased to be important for the
    >> point-and-shoot user once all cameras started offering over 4 or 5
    >> megapixels unless the intent is to print posters.

    >
    >Thanks. That's a ton of great information.
    >
    >I'll do what you suggested about going to places like Best Buy, Target, etc.
    >I did go to WalMart and the cameras were all chained down, so I couldn't
    >really figure out which cameras had which features and what type of battery
    >they used etc. But, I'll try the other stores.


    The are chained down in every store I've ever been to. However, they
    are also connected to a power source so you can activate the camera
    and go through the menus. The chain doesn't interfere with getting
    the "feel" of the camera in your hands. If one is not connected, have
    the clerk do so.

    I'd go for one with an optical viewfinder, but I don't see them around
    at that price range. Or at all.

    >I did notice that the descriptions talk about optical zoom and digital zoom,
    >so now I know to just focus on the optical zoom part.
    >
    >Part of why I am interested in higher megapixels is that I sometimes take
    >photos of a high part of a building or a chimney etc. that needs work, but
    >from ground level. Then, when I get the photos on my computer, I can zoom
    >in and see more detail about the condition of the chimney etc. I don't know
    >if higher megapixels really makes a difference in my being able to do that,
    >but with the cameras that I had in the past that was a great feature.


    Well, the difference isn't going to be that great in megapixels if you
    compare at price levels. They're all up there now. The trick is to
    avoid going to full zoom if the full zoom goes into the digital zoom
    range. That's the way most, or all, work. The digital zoom increases
    the size of what you see, but loses the detail of what you capture.
    Most point-and-shoots have a line on an icon on the screen that tells
    you when you are going from optical to digital.

    >One other thing that I sometimes need to do is take pictures of rooms (like
    >a bathroom or kitchen) that has been remodeled, and it would be good to be
    >able to take a wider angle shot if possible to get more of the room in one
    >picture. I have seen cameras that say "wide angle", but after reading more
    >about some of that, it appears that the only truly "wide angle" cameras are
    >the higher end ones that are not "point and shoot". But, I thought I'd
    >mention that in case there is anything I should look for in terms of "wide
    >angle" on the point and shoot cameras.


    Point-and-shoots can be used for panoramas. It's software that
    creates a panorama using a point and shoot*, and Elements will do
    that. Elements would be worth having for other purposes. A tripod or
    monopod is almost essential for a panorama. A panorama is better than
    a wide angle shot with a point and shoot because the widest setting
    can (not will) produce distortion at the edges. Shoot the panorama
    images in portrait, not landscape.

    *Some point-and-shoots do in-camera stitching, but I don't think
    that's a feature in your price range of cameras. I may be wrong.

    There are some generalities above, and some cameras may be an
    exception.





    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
    Tony Cooper, Jun 30, 2013
    #6
  7. Jake29

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <>, tonycooper214
    @gmail.com says...
    >
    > On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 21:34:16 -0400, "Jake29" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >"Tony Cooper" <> wrote in message
    > >news:p...
    > >>> On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 16:04:52 -0400, "Jake29" <>
    > >>> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>So, I am looking for suggestions of a new point-and-shoot digital camera.
    > >>>I
    > >>>definitely don't want one that uses AA batteries (rechargeable or not) as
    > >>>many of them seem to do these days -- I want one with a rechargeable
    > >>>Li-Ion
    > >>>battery.
    > >>>
    > >>>I am looking for any suggestions that people here may have regarding which
    > >>>brand and model camera to buy.

    > >
    > >> My suggestion is to go to a store like Best Buy, Target, Wal-Mart, etc
    > >> where they have a row of point-and-shoots for you to choose from.
    > >> Don't go to a camera store where the clerk has to pull each out for
    > >> you to examine.
    > >>
    > >> Handle all of the Nikon and Canon point-and-shoots (they are the two
    > >> brands with the most models in the price range you describe) and
    > >> determine which one(s) fit your hand and your pocket. Operate the
    > >> controls to see which one is easiest for you to view the menus and
    > >> change the settings. Make sure the shutter release and menu controls
    > >> are in a position that makes it easy for you to use.
    > >>
    > >> Make sure the zoom control is smooth and easy for you to use. You
    > >> should only be concerned about the *optical* zoom. The *digital* zoom
    > >> is practically worthless. Labels will mislead you. Some cameras brag
    > >> about total zoom, but include the digital zoom in that figure. Look
    > >> closer at just the optical zoom figure.
    > >>
    > >> I disagree with your preference about AA batteries, but it's your
    > >> camera and your money. My in-the-car point-and-shoot (my regular
    > >> camera is a Nikon DSLR) uses rechargeable AA batteries and shoots RAW
    > >> and has manual settings. I like the idea that if I haven't used it
    > >> for a while, and the batteries are flat, I can buy regular AA
    > >> batteries at any store and use them. If my Nikon Li-Ion battery goes
    > >> flat, I have to go home to charge it. (Well, *I* don't, but I have
    > >> three batteries and always carry charged spares.)
    > >>
    > >> With the features you want, there's not an eyelash's difference
    > >> between similarly priced Nikon and Canon point-and-shoots. You aren't
    > >> looking for RAW, manual controls, or other bells and whistles.
    > >> There are other brands that are equal to Nikon and Canon, but I'm
    > >> trying to keep it simple here.
    > >>
    > >> The way the camera fits your hand, and the ease of use for you, are
    > >> more important considerations than brand and model.
    > >>
    > >> The camera makers are always coming out with new models, and stores
    > >> like to move out discontinued models. I recently purchased a Nikon
    > >> point-and-shoot for $99 at H.H. Gregg that had sold the week before
    > >> for over $200. I gave it to a relative. Replacement parts aren't a
    > >> consideration, so discontinued models are worth buying.
    > >>
    > >> About megapixels...most of the cameras you'll see are about the same
    > >> in models in the same price range. But, big megapixel numbers are
    > >> really only important to people who want to make large prints. The
    > >> difference between a 12 megapixel camera and a 24 megapixel camera
    > >> will not been seen in a 4" x 6" print. On a computer screen, not even
    > >> discernable. Megapixel numbers ceased to be important for the
    > >> point-and-shoot user once all cameras started offering over 4 or 5
    > >> megapixels unless the intent is to print posters.

    > >
    > >Thanks. That's a ton of great information.
    > >
    > >I'll do what you suggested about going to places like Best Buy, Target, etc.
    > >I did go to WalMart and the cameras were all chained down, so I couldn't
    > >really figure out which cameras had which features and what type of battery
    > >they used etc. But, I'll try the other stores.

    >
    > The are chained down in every store I've ever been to. However, they
    > are also connected to a power source so you can activate the camera
    > and go through the menus. The chain doesn't interfere with getting
    > the "feel" of the camera in your hands. If one is not connected, have
    > the clerk do so.
    >
    > I'd go for one with an optical viewfinder, but I don't see them around
    > at that price range. Or at all.
    >
    > >I did notice that the descriptions talk about optical zoom and digital zoom,
    > >so now I know to just focus on the optical zoom part.
    > >
    > >Part of why I am interested in higher megapixels is that I sometimes take
    > >photos of a high part of a building or a chimney etc. that needs work, but
    > >from ground level. Then, when I get the photos on my computer, I can zoom
    > >in and see more detail about the condition of the chimney etc. I don't know
    > >if higher megapixels really makes a difference in my being able to do that,
    > >but with the cameras that I had in the past that was a great feature.

    >
    > Well, the difference isn't going to be that great in megapixels if you
    > compare at price levels. They're all up there now. The trick is to
    > avoid going to full zoom if the full zoom goes into the digital zoom
    > range. That's the way most, or all, work. The digital zoom increases
    > the size of what you see, but loses the detail of what you capture.
    > Most point-and-shoots have a line on an icon on the screen that tells
    > you when you are going from optical to digital.
    >
    > >One other thing that I sometimes need to do is take pictures of rooms (like
    > >a bathroom or kitchen) that has been remodeled, and it would be good to be
    > >able to take a wider angle shot if possible to get more of the room in one
    > >picture. I have seen cameras that say "wide angle", but after reading more
    > >about some of that, it appears that the only truly "wide angle" cameras are
    > >the higher end ones that are not "point and shoot". But, I thought I'd
    > >mention that in case there is anything I should look for in terms of "wide
    > >angle" on the point and shoot cameras.

    >
    > Point-and-shoots can be used for panoramas. It's software that
    > creates a panorama using a point and shoot*, and Elements will do
    > that. Elements would be worth having for other purposes. A tripod or
    > monopod is almost essential for a panorama. A panorama is better than
    > a wide angle shot with a point and shoot because the widest setting
    > can (not will) produce distortion at the edges. Shoot the panorama
    > images in portrait, not landscape.
    >
    > *Some point-and-shoots do in-camera stitching, but I don't think
    > that's a feature in your price range of cameras. I may be wrong.
    >
    > There are some generalities above, and some cameras may be an
    > exception.


    FWIW, the Canon SX500 is on sale right now for 199 at Best Buy, it zooms
    out to 720mm equivalent and in to 24mm equivalent. It's a bit bulky
    though.
    J. Clarke, Jun 30, 2013
    #7
  8. Jake29

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Tony Cooper
    <> wrote:

    > >I'll do what you suggested about going to places like Best Buy, Target, etc.
    > >I did go to WalMart and the cameras were all chained down, so I couldn't
    > >really figure out which cameras had which features and what type of battery
    > >they used etc. But, I'll try the other stores.

    >
    > The are chained down in every store I've ever been to. However, they
    > are also connected to a power source so you can activate the camera
    > and go through the menus. The chain doesn't interfere with getting
    > the "feel" of the camera in your hands. If one is not connected, have
    > the clerk do so.


    by chained down, he most likely means tied down to the display, so you
    can't pick it up at *all*. some stores do that. others don't.

    at the stores where the cameras are on a tether (i.e., not chained
    down) you can try them out, but many times they're not connected to a
    power supply and the battery might not have a full charge or it's
    missing entirely.
    nospam, Jun 30, 2013
    #8
  9. Jake29

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 22:44:18 -0400, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, Tony Cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> >I'll do what you suggested about going to places like Best Buy, Target, etc.
    >> >I did go to WalMart and the cameras were all chained down, so I couldn't
    >> >really figure out which cameras had which features and what type of battery
    >> >they used etc. But, I'll try the other stores.

    >>
    >> The are chained down in every store I've ever been to. However, they
    >> are also connected to a power source so you can activate the camera
    >> and go through the menus. The chain doesn't interfere with getting
    >> the "feel" of the camera in your hands. If one is not connected, have
    >> the clerk do so.

    >
    >by chained down, he most likely means tied down to the display, so you
    >can't pick it up at *all*. some stores do that.


    I've never seen that done at any Best Buy, Wal-Mart, Target, etc. They
    are all connected by a tether and can be pulled away and hand held.
    They are usually connected to a power source so the menus can be
    accessed. Most stores will allow you to put in your own SD card and
    take a photo if you want.

    >others don't.
    >
    >at the stores where the cameras are on a tether (i.e., not chained
    >down) you can try them out, but many times they're not connected to a
    >power supply and the battery might not have a full charge or it's
    >missing entirely.


    I've never seen one on display that is purely battery operated. They
    are connected to a power supply or a charger via cable. Often, one or
    more is not connected, but can be connected on request.

    What I see in this area is that the cameras are kept behind the
    counter in camera stores and the clerk has to bring each out
    individually. I think it's preferable to be able to quickly handle
    half a dozen models to eliminate those that don't fit right and narrow
    it down to those that do.

    Certainly, not all stores in all areas do it the same way. However,
    going to one or more of those stores will quickly let the OP know what
    to expect in his area.

    What I also see in this area is that the camera store clerks are paid
    at least partially on commission. This means they will not look
    kindly about bringing out half a dozen cameras and going over each one
    of them for a sale of under $200 (the OP's budget). They might if the
    store was empty, but first sign of a potential DSLR buyer at over
    $1,000 and the clerk starts rushing through things and trying to
    close.

    While I would direct someone buying their first DSLR to a camera
    store, this is the OP's third (at least) point-and-shoot and the
    variations between models in his price range are minimal. He's more
    concerned, according to his post, about size, megapixels, zoom, and
    battery type. Size can be determined quickly by just looking at the
    row of cameras. Megapixels and zoom will be on the little card where
    the camera is attached. (Zoom, though, might be misleading as earlier
    mentioned by me) Battery type can be determined by just flipping open
    the compartment.

    I agree that big box clerks are not as informed as camera store
    clerks, but this is a choice that is between basically
    feature-identical products.

    Even finding a camera store can be a problem. Orlando's a fairly big
    town, but there are only two camera stores in town, and one of them
    carries only high-end compact cameras. The larger store carries a
    wide selection, but their point and shoots are behind the counter and
    not connected to chargers or power supplies. They take the batteries
    out of all their display cameras (P&S and DSLR) and put them in only
    when demonstrating them. Sometimes you have to wait for a battery to
    be available if it's a proprietary battery because other clerks are
    using them.

    Also, this store is closed on Sunday, closed at 7:30 M-T, until 9 on
    Friday, and 6 on Saturday.









    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
    Tony Cooper, Jun 30, 2013
    #9
  10. Jake29

    RichA Guest

    On Saturday, June 29, 2013 4:04:52 PM UTC-4, Jake29 wrote:
    > I lost the digital camera that I had and I need to buy a new one.
    >
    >
    >
    > The one I had was a Kodak-something (I forget the model number), and the one
    >
    > that I had before that was a Kodak EasyShare V1253. I lost the last one
    >
    > and the V1253 died on me for some reason.
    >
    >
    >
    > Both cameras were point-and-shoot digital cameras. Both had fairly high
    >
    > megapixels and a fairly high zoom. What I liked about both of them is that
    >
    > they both had rechargeable Li-Ion batteries that lasted a long time on each
    >
    > charge -- a feature that I definitely want.
    >
    >
    >
    > It looks like Kodak is out of the digital camera business, so apparently I
    >
    > can't buy another Kodak digital camera. If I could, I would.
    >
    >
    >
    > So, I am looking for suggestions of a new point-and-shoot digital camera. I
    >
    > definitely don't want one that uses AA batteries (rechargeable or not) as
    >
    > many of them seem to do these days -- I want one with a rechargeable Li-Ion
    >
    > battery.
    >
    >
    >
    > I like the plain flat version of digital cameras that I can just keep in my
    >
    > pocket; not the bigger size cameras that are out there. I am expecting the
    >
    > cost to be less that about $200. If it has the right battery type
    >
    > (rechargeable Li-Ion), a fairly high megapixel rating, and a fairly high
    >
    > optical zoom, that would be great.
    >
    >
    >
    > I don't do any fancy or professional picture taking -- mostly just people
    >
    > and events that I go to (birthday parties, etc.). I do use a camera a lot
    >
    > for taking photos of construction work in progress while rehabbing
    >
    > properties that I own -- to record wiring, plumbing, etc. before the walls
    >
    > are closed up etc.
    >
    >
    >
    > I am looking for any suggestions that people here may have regarding which
    >
    > brand and model camera to buy.
    >
    >
    >
    > I will read all replies and will follow up here with more info etc. if
    >
    > needed.
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks.


    Buy a used Panasonic LX3 or LX5. They were the best of the breed for flattish P&S cameras.
    RichA, Jun 30, 2013
    #10
  11. Jake29

    David Taylor Guest

    On 29/06/2013 21:04, Jake29 wrote:
    []
    > I like the plain flat version of digital cameras that I can just keep in my
    > pocket; not the bigger size cameras that are out there. I am expecting the
    > cost to be less that about $200. If it has the right battery type
    > (rechargeable Li-Ion), a fairly high megapixel rating, and a fairly high
    > optical zoom, that would be great.

    []
    > Thanks.


    Based on previous experience, I would recommend the Panasonic range,
    such as:


    http://www.dpreview.com/news/2013/01/07/Panasonic-Lumix-DMC-ZS30-TZ40-and-DMC-ZS25-TZ35

    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Jun 30, 2013
    #11
  12. On 6/30/2013 3:29 AM, David Taylor wrote:
    > On 29/06/2013 21:04, Jake29 wrote:
    > []
    >> I like the plain flat version of digital cameras that I can just keep
    >> in my
    >> pocket; not the bigger size cameras that are out there. I am
    >> expecting the
    >> cost to be less that about $200. If it has the right battery type
    >> (rechargeable Li-Ion), a fairly high megapixel rating, and a fairly high
    >> optical zoom, that would be great.

    > []
    >> Thanks.

    >
    > Based on previous experience, I would recommend the Panasonic range,
    > such as:
    >
    >
    > http://www.dpreview.com/news/2013/01/07/Panasonic-Lumix-DMC-ZS30-TZ40-and-DMC-ZS25-TZ35
    >


    To me, the important thing about a point and shoot is that it has an
    optical viewfinder for use in bright light.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not." in Reply To.
    James Silverton, Jun 30, 2013
    #12
  13. Jake29

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <kqome0$3q5$>, david-
    d says...
    >
    > On 29/06/2013 21:04, Jake29 wrote:
    > []
    > > I like the plain flat version of digital cameras that I can just keep in my
    > > pocket; not the bigger size cameras that are out there. I am expecting the
    > > cost to be less that about $200. If it has the right battery type
    > > (rechargeable Li-Ion), a fairly high megapixel rating, and a fairly high
    > > optical zoom, that would be great.

    > []
    > > Thanks.

    >
    > Based on previous experience, I would recommend the Panasonic range,
    > such as:
    >
    >
    > http://www.dpreview.com/news/2013/01/07/Panasonic-Lumix-DMC-ZS30-TZ40-and-DMC-ZS25-TZ35


    Panasonic was my initial thought too but they're anywhere from a bit to
    a lot above his price range.
    J. Clarke, Jun 30, 2013
    #13
  14. Jake29

    David Taylor Guest

    On 30/06/2013 13:15, James Silverton wrote:
    []
    > To me, the important thing about a point and shoot is that it has an
    > optical viewfinder for use in bright light.


    Optical or EVF you put to the eye is nice, and I have EVF on my Sony
    HX200V. If you have problems focussing close up, it can be helpful as
    well. It does increase the cost and size though, and may otherwise
    restrict your choice. The OP would be well advised to visit a camera
    shop and see for himself.
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Jun 30, 2013
    #14
  15. Jake29

    David Taylor Guest

    On 30/06/2013 13:28, J. Clarke wrote:
    []
    >> http://www.dpreview.com/news/2013/01/07/Panasonic-Lumix-DMC-ZS30-TZ40-and-DMC-ZS25-TZ35

    >
    > Panasonic was my initial thought too but they're anywhere from a bit to
    > a lot above his price range.


    Yes, the best often cost a little more, but as it appears to be for work
    rather than home snapshots perhaps the extra is worth paying? There are
    lower-cost, more limited models than the ones I mentioned in the
    Panasonic range, and a second-hand item could be another way to reduce cost.
    --
    Cheers,
    David
    Web: http://www.satsignal.eu
    David Taylor, Jun 30, 2013
    #15
  16. Jake29

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 16:54:25 -0400, Tony Cooper <>
    wrote:
    : On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 16:04:52 -0400, "Jake29" <>
    : wrote:
    :
    : >I lost the digital camera that I had and I need to buy a new one.
    : > ...
    : >
    : >So, I am looking for suggestions of a new point-and-shoot digital camera. I
    : >definitely don't want one that uses AA batteries (rechargeable or not) as
    : >many of them seem to do these days -- I want one with a rechargeable Li-Ion
    : >battery.
    : > ...
    :
    : I disagree with your preference about AA batteries, but it's your
    : camera and your money. My in-the-car point-and-shoot (my regular
    : camera is a Nikon DSLR) uses rechargeable AA batteries and shoots RAW
    : and has manual settings. I like the idea that if I haven't used it
    : for a while, and the batteries are flat, I can buy regular AA
    : batteries at any store and use them. If my Nikon Li-Ion battery goes
    : flat, I have to go home to charge it. (Well, *I* don't, but I have
    : three batteries and always carry charged spares.)

    Something I was reminded of the other day when I was charging my batteries for
    a shoot: All my AAs (I keep about 50 in play) needed at least some charging
    time, even if they hadn't been used since their last charge. But three
    proprietary camera batteries that had been sitting outside the camera showed
    full charge after less than 15 seconds on the charger. Pretty clearly, those
    batteries hold a charge better than the AAs do.

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Jul 1, 2013
    #16
  17. Jake29

    Wally Guest

    On Sun, 30 Jun 2013 20:41:36 -0400, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    >Something I was reminded of the other day when I was charging my batteries for
    >a shoot: All my AAs (I keep about 50 in play) needed at least some charging
    >time, even if they hadn't been used since their last charge. But three
    >proprietary camera batteries that had been sitting outside the camera showed
    >full charge after less than 15 seconds on the charger. Pretty clearly, those
    >batteries hold a charge better than the AAs do.


    If they showed a full charge after 15 sec, then either they were still
    fully charged, or they have deteriorated to the point they won't hold
    a charge for long.

    W
    Wally, Jul 1, 2013
    #17
  18. Jake29

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Robert Coe
    <> wrote:

    > : I disagree with your preference about AA batteries, but it's your
    > : camera and your money. My in-the-car point-and-shoot (my regular
    > : camera is a Nikon DSLR) uses rechargeable AA batteries and shoots RAW
    > : and has manual settings. I like the idea that if I haven't used it
    > : for a while, and the batteries are flat, I can buy regular AA
    > : batteries at any store and use them. If my Nikon Li-Ion battery goes
    > : flat, I have to go home to charge it. (Well, *I* don't, but I have
    > : three batteries and always carry charged spares.)
    >
    > Something I was reminded of the other day when I was charging my batteries for
    > a shoot: All my AAs (I keep about 50 in play) needed at least some charging
    > time, even if they hadn't been used since their last charge. But three
    > proprietary camera batteries that had been sitting outside the camera showed
    > full charge after less than 15 seconds on the charger. Pretty clearly, those
    > batteries hold a charge better than the AAs do.


    try eneloops. their self-discharge is much, much slower than a typical
    nimh aa.

    also keep in mind that lithium ion batteries often show a full charge
    even when they're not (usually 95% or higher) because overcharging them
    can go boom. some chargers show full at even lower levels.
    nospam, Jul 1, 2013
    #18
  19. Jake29

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Tony Cooper
    <> wrote:

    > Even finding a camera store can be a problem. Orlando's a fairly big
    > town, but there are only two camera stores in town, and one of them
    > carries only high-end compact cameras. The larger store carries a
    > wide selection, but their point and shoots are behind the counter and
    > not connected to chargers or power supplies. They take the batteries
    > out of all their display cameras (P&S and DSLR) and put them in only
    > when demonstrating them. Sometimes you have to wait for a battery to
    > be available if it's a proprietary battery because other clerks are
    > using them.


    sounds like two stores that are destined to be history.

    > Also, this store is closed on Sunday, closed at 7:30 M-T, until 9 on
    > Friday, and 6 on Saturday.


    those hours aren't that unusual, but soon it will be closed every day.
    nospam, Jul 1, 2013
    #19
  20. Jake29

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Sun, 30 Jun 2013 23:05:52 -0400, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, Tony Cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> Even finding a camera store can be a problem. Orlando's a fairly big
    >> town, but there are only two camera stores in town, and one of them
    >> carries only high-end compact cameras. The larger store carries a
    >> wide selection, but their point and shoots are behind the counter and
    >> not connected to chargers or power supplies. They take the batteries
    >> out of all their display cameras (P&S and DSLR) and put them in only
    >> when demonstrating them. Sometimes you have to wait for a battery to
    >> be available if it's a proprietary battery because other clerks are
    >> using them.

    >
    >sounds like two stores that are destined to be history.
    >
    >> Also, this store is closed on Sunday, closed at 7:30 M-T, until 9 on
    >> Friday, and 6 on Saturday.

    >
    >those hours aren't that unusual, but soon it will be closed every day.


    Well, the larger store has been in business since 1954 and is the
    largest camera store in Central Florida, maybe in a larger area. At
    the camera counter, there are usually at least six experienced clerks
    working whenever you go in there. The 15,000 square feet of space is
    divided about half-and-half between photography equipment and hobby
    items from model railroad trains to radio controlled model cars,
    boats, and airplanes. They also do matting and framing.

    The smaller store has been here since I moved to the area 35 years
    ago, but I don't know how long they'd been in business by then. They
    also operate a school of photography.

    Both are active sponsors of the local camera clubs and routinely bring
    in new camera products to show. Both have outlasted Ritz, Wolfe, and
    several independent camera dealers who have all gone bye-bye.

    While they both sell the lower tier point-and-shoots, both stores seem
    to have let the big box stores go for that market. Both sell cameras
    and accessories that are not available at the big box stores.

    But, if - with your marketing savvy - if you say they are destined for
    failure, then there's no choice but to acknowledge they are dead meat.
    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
    Tony Cooper, Jul 1, 2013
    #20
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