Burning CD's - problems - Can someone help?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Admiralla, Apr 8, 2004.

  1. Admiralla

    Admiralla Guest

    Hello,

    I have recently run into trouble burning CD's. I've been successfully using
    the same brand for a few months with no problem. But now, they are suddenly
    not burning properly or seem to be burning in some kind of compressed
    format.

    I burned a music CD for my friend of about 20 songs (which would normally
    take up nearly a full CD) which won't play in her CD player but WILL play on
    her computer. I tried it on my CD player to see if it would work and the
    same thing happened, I didn't get one song. In fact, it registered as one
    song on the disc and played as faint static. Yet, on my computer I could
    play it no problem

    Is it possible it's burning in some kind of compressed format? If so, how do
    I change this? The CD's I'm using are Maxell and I've burned several music
    CD's for the kids with these CD's with little to no problem. I am using
    Windows XP Pro and Windows Media Player 9.

    If someone can offer some insight that would be wonderful...

    TIA,

    Addie
    "Not a computer genius, but hardly illiterate...."
     
    Admiralla, Apr 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Admiralla

    Thor Guest

    "Admiralla" <> wrote in message
    news:c526fm$fd3$...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have recently run into trouble burning CD's. I've been successfully

    using
    > the same brand for a few months with no problem. But now, they are

    suddenly
    > not burning properly or seem to be burning in some kind of compressed
    > format.
    >
    > I burned a music CD for my friend of about 20 songs (which would normally
    > take up nearly a full CD) which won't play in her CD player but WILL play

    on
    > her computer. I tried it on my CD player to see if it would work and the
    > same thing happened, I didn't get one song. In fact, it registered as one
    > song on the disc and played as faint static. Yet, on my computer I could
    > play it no problem
    >
    > Is it possible it's burning in some kind of compressed format? If so, how

    do
    > I change this? The CD's I'm using are Maxell and I've burned several music
    > CD's for the kids with these CD's with little to no problem. I am using
    > Windows XP Pro and Windows Media Player 9.
    >
    > If someone can offer some insight that would be wonderful...
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Addie
    > "Not a computer genius, but hardly illiterate...."


    Sounds to me like you are in fact burning a "data" CD with your songs in WMP
    or MP3 format. This format would be unrecognizable to most CD players out
    there, but will play fine in your PC. I would suggest checking your Media
    Player settings and make sure it is set to burn an "audio" CD. This is an
    excerpt from Media Player 9's help files:


    Comparing audio and data CDs
    The following sections explain the differences between using the Player to
    create audio and data CDs.

    Audio CDs
    The Player creates (burns) audio CDs according to the Red Book audio format.
    (Audio CDs are also known as Red Book CDs because of the way information is
    arranged on the disc.) These audio CDs can be played back in any CD-ROM
    drive and in most home and car CD players. However, not all CD players can
    play compact disc-recordable (CD-R) and compact disc-rewritable (CD-RW)
    discs.

    Volume leveling (also known as normalization) is applied to all tracks that
    the Player copies to audio CDs. This may cause the CD creation process to
    take longer, but it results in a more even volume level for all the tracks
    copied to the CD and prevents some tracks from sounding louder than others.

    Note that the application of volume leveling when creating audio CDs is only
    available on select versions of Windows. For more information, see Special
    features.

    To create an audio CD, the Player automatically converts Windows Media
    Audio, .wav, and .mp3 files into .cda files before copying them to CD.

    A two-second gap is added between each CD track.

    Data CDs
    The Player creates data CDs according to the Joliet format. A data CD is a
    CD that contains compressed files and a file structure. A data CD may simply
    contain compressed audio files, but the files are typically much smaller
    than typical audio files. Therefore, a data CD may contain more audio files
    than an audio CD, depending on the type and the compression level of the
    audio files. Most computers and some CD players can play back the compressed
    audio files contained on a data CD.

    A data CD may or may not contain audio or video content. For example, the
    CDs used to install an operating system or programs are data CDs. If the
    data CD contains audio files with a file type that is supported by the
    Player, such as files with a .wma, .wav, or .mp3 extension, you can use the
    Player to play the files.

    When you create a data CD using the Player, files are copied to the root of
    the CD in a directory named playlist. The files are converted if necessary
    (for example, if a specific bit rate is selected). You can copy both
    playlists and digital media files to a data CD. The Player copies the files
    in the order that they are listed in the Items to Copy pane and in the
    playlists that you copy. The organization of the playlist is preserved.
    Media information, with the exception of album art, is also copied to the
    data CD.

    By default, the Player creates a playlist with a .wpl extension that
    contains the files as they are listed in the Items to Copy pane. You can
    also have the Player create a playlist with an .m3u extension so that
    devices that use .m3u playlists can play the files.

    By default, the name of data CDs is the date (for example, Sept 04 02) that
    you created the CD. The date changes if you copy more files to the CD.

    Even if you use a compact disc-recordable (CD-R) to create a data CD, you
    can copy files to the CD at another time as long as the disc is not full.
    This is because the disc is never closed, meaning that more data can always
    be written to the CD as long as the disc is not full. Note that data CDs may
    not play in CD players that require closed compact discs.
     
    Thor, Apr 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. Admiralla

    Admiralla Guest

    Well, that was it... turns out I had it set to burn a data CD.... just a
    little something that I had to select on my drop down menu... silly me....
    but hey.. I knew it had to be something simple...

    thanks Thor!

    "Thor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Admiralla" <> wrote in message
    > news:c526fm$fd3$...
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I have recently run into trouble burning CD's. I've been successfully

    > using
    > > the same brand for a few months with no problem. But now, they are

    > suddenly
    > > not burning properly or seem to be burning in some kind of compressed
    > > format.
    > >
    > > I burned a music CD for my friend of about 20 songs (which would

    normally
    > > take up nearly a full CD) which won't play in her CD player but WILL

    play
    > on
    > > her computer. I tried it on my CD player to see if it would work and the
    > > same thing happened, I didn't get one song. In fact, it registered as

    one
    > > song on the disc and played as faint static. Yet, on my computer I could
    > > play it no problem
    > >
    > > Is it possible it's burning in some kind of compressed format? If so,

    how
    > do
    > > I change this? The CD's I'm using are Maxell and I've burned several

    music
    > > CD's for the kids with these CD's with little to no problem. I am using
    > > Windows XP Pro and Windows Media Player 9.
    > >
    > > If someone can offer some insight that would be wonderful...
    > >
    > > TIA,
    > >
    > > Addie
    > > "Not a computer genius, but hardly illiterate...."

    >
    > Sounds to me like you are in fact burning a "data" CD with your songs in

    WMP
    > or MP3 format. This format would be unrecognizable to most CD players out
    > there, but will play fine in your PC. I would suggest checking your Media
    > Player settings and make sure it is set to burn an "audio" CD. This is an
    > excerpt from Media Player 9's help files:
    >
    >
    > Comparing audio and data CDs
    > The following sections explain the differences between using the Player to
    > create audio and data CDs.
    >
    > Audio CDs
    > The Player creates (burns) audio CDs according to the Red Book audio

    format.
    > (Audio CDs are also known as Red Book CDs because of the way information

    is
    > arranged on the disc.) These audio CDs can be played back in any CD-ROM
    > drive and in most home and car CD players. However, not all CD players can
    > play compact disc-recordable (CD-R) and compact disc-rewritable (CD-RW)
    > discs.
    >
    > Volume leveling (also known as normalization) is applied to all tracks

    that
    > the Player copies to audio CDs. This may cause the CD creation process to
    > take longer, but it results in a more even volume level for all the tracks
    > copied to the CD and prevents some tracks from sounding louder than

    others.
    >
    > Note that the application of volume leveling when creating audio CDs is

    only
    > available on select versions of Windows. For more information, see Special
    > features.
    >
    > To create an audio CD, the Player automatically converts Windows Media
    > Audio, .wav, and .mp3 files into .cda files before copying them to CD.
    >
    > A two-second gap is added between each CD track.
    >
    > Data CDs
    > The Player creates data CDs according to the Joliet format. A data CD is a
    > CD that contains compressed files and a file structure. A data CD may

    simply
    > contain compressed audio files, but the files are typically much smaller
    > than typical audio files. Therefore, a data CD may contain more audio

    files
    > than an audio CD, depending on the type and the compression level of the
    > audio files. Most computers and some CD players can play back the

    compressed
    > audio files contained on a data CD.
    >
    > A data CD may or may not contain audio or video content. For example, the
    > CDs used to install an operating system or programs are data CDs. If the
    > data CD contains audio files with a file type that is supported by the
    > Player, such as files with a .wma, .wav, or .mp3 extension, you can use

    the
    > Player to play the files.
    >
    > When you create a data CD using the Player, files are copied to the root

    of
    > the CD in a directory named playlist. The files are converted if necessary
    > (for example, if a specific bit rate is selected). You can copy both
    > playlists and digital media files to a data CD. The Player copies the

    files
    > in the order that they are listed in the Items to Copy pane and in the
    > playlists that you copy. The organization of the playlist is preserved.
    > Media information, with the exception of album art, is also copied to the
    > data CD.
    >
    > By default, the Player creates a playlist with a .wpl extension that
    > contains the files as they are listed in the Items to Copy pane. You can
    > also have the Player create a playlist with an .m3u extension so that
    > devices that use .m3u playlists can play the files.
    >
    > By default, the name of data CDs is the date (for example, Sept 04 02)

    that
    > you created the CD. The date changes if you copy more files to the CD.
    >
    > Even if you use a compact disc-recordable (CD-R) to create a data CD, you
    > can copy files to the CD at another time as long as the disc is not full.
    > This is because the disc is never closed, meaning that more data can

    always
    > be written to the CD as long as the disc is not full. Note that data CDs

    may
    > not play in CD players that require closed compact discs.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Admiralla, Apr 8, 2004
    #3
  4. Admiralla

    HF Guest

    It does pay to read so read www.cdrfaq.org and download the file to a floppy
    for referemce.
    "Admiralla" <> wrote in message
    news:c526fm$fd3$...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have recently run into trouble burning CD's. I've been successfully

    using
    > the same brand for a few months with no problem. But now, they are

    suddenly
    > not burning properly or seem to be burning in some kind of compressed
    > format.
    >
    > I burned a music CD for my friend of about 20 songs (which would normally
    > take up nearly a full CD) which won't play in her CD player but WILL play

    on
    > her computer. I tried it on my CD player to see if it would work and the
    > same thing happened, I didn't get one song. In fact, it registered as one
    > song on the disc and played as faint static. Yet, on my computer I could
    > play it no problem
    >
    > Is it possible it's burning in some kind of compressed format? If so, how

    do
    > I change this? The CD's I'm using are Maxell and I've burned several music
    > CD's for the kids with these CD's with little to no problem. I am using
    > Windows XP Pro and Windows Media Player 9.
    >
    > If someone can offer some insight that would be wonderful...
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Addie
    > "Not a computer genius, but hardly illiterate...."
    >
    >



    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.650 / Virus Database: 416 - Release Date: 04/04/2004
     
    HF, Apr 8, 2004
    #4
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