Burning 78 rpm disk to CDROM

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Voltardo, Sep 24, 2004.

  1. Voltardo

    Voltardo Guest

    Greetings,

    My great grandfather gave me his prized victrola music player, 78 rpm,
    wind-up motor, huge brass speaker made in the shape of a morning glory
    blossom, beauiful. It must have been desighed by a genius. the sound
    pick-up is on the opposite end of the speaker and uses a rather thick,
    pointed pin that passes over the media where it must decode and play the
    sounds. Isn't this exciting?! I don't think I'll ever fully understand
    it, it is so complicated, however, I would like to rescue the music from
    the disks, if possible, by burning then to cd. Can this be done? If you
    can help, I will give you a copy of "Happy Trails To You" sung by the
    silver throated pair, Dale Evans and Roy Rogers.

    Thank in advance for any help.

    --
    Tardo

    Recedite, plebes! Gero rem imperialem!
     
    Voltardo, Sep 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. Voltardo

    Ingeborg Guest

    Voltardo <absinthe@.ambergris.wow> wrote in news:2eidnfwPK7LZRs7cRVn-
    :

    > Greetings,
    >
    > My great grandfather gave me his prized victrola music player, 78 rpm,
    > wind-up motor, huge brass speaker made in the shape of a morning glory
    > blossom, beauiful. It must have been desighed by a genius. the sound
    > pick-up is on the opposite end of the speaker and uses a rather thick,
    > pointed pin that passes over the media where it must decode and play

    the
    > sounds. Isn't this exciting?! I don't think I'll ever fully understand
    > it, it is so complicated, however, I would like to rescue the music

    from
    > the disks, if possible, by burning then to cd. Can this be done? If you
    > can help, I will give you a copy of "Happy Trails To You" sung by the
    > silver throated pair, Dale Evans and Roy Rogers.
    >
    > Thank in advance for any help.
    >


    Most simple way is to get an electronical music player which can do 78
    rpm. Most '70 player did so. When it has a line out you can connect it
    direct to the soundcard, else you need a pre amplifier. You can put it
    directly on the soundcard, but then you'll need some dedicated filtering.
    (The output must not be amplified lineair).
    I think a cheap player is sufficient, since it's better than the original
    tracks can be.

    When you want to record it from the pure mechanical wonder, you'll need a
    high quality microphone at your soundcard, and a sound-proof room.
     
    Ingeborg, Sep 24, 2004
    #2
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  3. Voltardo

    Ionizer Guest

    "Voltardo" <absinthe@.ambergris.wow> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Greetings,
    >
    > My great grandfather gave me his prized victrola music player, 78 rpm,
    > wind-up motor, huge brass speaker made in the shape of a morning glory
    > blossom, beauiful. It must have been desighed by a genius. the sound
    > pick-up is on the opposite end of the speaker and uses a rather thick,
    > pointed pin that passes over the media where it must decode and play the
    > sounds. Isn't this exciting?! I don't think I'll ever fully understand
    > it, it is so complicated, however, I would like to rescue the music from
    > the disks, if possible, by burning then to cd. Can this be done? If you
    > can help, I will give you a copy of "Happy Trails To You" sung by the
    > silver throated pair, Dale Evans and Roy Rogers.
    >


    You'll need a slightly more modern turntable than that- preferably one
    which can play at 78RPM. Then you just hook up your stereo to your sound
    card: http://www.pcworld.com/howto/article/0,aid,17663,00.asp I think
    that another alternative *might* be to play the records at 45RPM if that's
    as fast as your turntable goes, and then later speed the playback of the
    wav file with editing software, but I have never done this.

    More links I have bookmarked on the topic of vinyl/tape to CD-R:

    http://www.shareup.com/dadioh/

    http://www.delback.co.uk/lp-cdr.htm

    http://www.gmayor.com/copy_vinyl_to_CDR.htm

    http://www.hitsquad.com/smm/news/1316/

    --
    Ian.
     
    Ionizer, Sep 24, 2004
    #3
  4. "Voltardo" <absinthe@.ambergris.wow> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Greetings,
    >
    > My great grandfather gave me his prized victrola music player, 78 rpm,
    > wind-up motor, huge brass speaker made in the shape of a morning glory
    > blossom, beauiful. It must have been desighed by a genius. the sound
    > pick-up is on the opposite end of the speaker and uses a rather thick,
    > pointed pin that passes over the media where it must decode and play the
    > sounds. Isn't this exciting?! I don't think I'll ever fully understand it,
    > it is so complicated, however, I would like to rescue the music from the
    > disks, if possible, by burning then to cd. Can this be done? If you can
    > help, I will give you a copy of "Happy Trails To You" sung by the silver
    > throated pair, Dale Evans and Roy Rogers.
    >
    > Thank in advance for any help.
    >
    > --
    > Tardo
    >
    > Recedite, plebes! Gero rem imperialem!


    RIP Vinyl will record to hard disk from any audio source, and if you didn't
    happen to also have a 78 RPM player, it could do the job on a 45 RPM
    turntable as well.

    The program is available with a free trial from
    http://www.ripvinyl.com/?040924 that inserts beeps on the recording, but
    allows you to see how easy it is to use.

    The full version costs an unbelievably low US $7.00

    Anthony Wieser
    Wieser Software Ltd
     
    Anthony Wieser, Sep 24, 2004
    #4
  5. Voltardo

    Voltardo Guest

    Thank to all for your responses. All the solutions were good ones.
    Thank again!



    Voltardo wrote:

    > Greetings,
    >
    > My great grandfather gave me his prized victrola music player, 78 rpm,
    > wind-up motor, huge brass speaker made in the shape of a morning glory
    > blossom, beauiful. It must have been desighed by a genius. the sound
    > pick-up is on the opposite end of the speaker and uses a rather thick,
    > pointed pin that passes over the media where it must decode and play the
    > sounds. Isn't this exciting?! I don't think I'll ever fully understand
    > it, it is so complicated, however, I would like to rescue the music from
    > the disks, if possible, by burning then to cd. Can this be done? If you
    > can help, I will give you a copy of "Happy Trails To You" sung by the
    > silver throated pair, Dale Evans and Roy Rogers.
    >
    > Thank in advance for any help.
    >
     
    Voltardo, Sep 24, 2004
    #5
  6. Voltardo

    philo Guest

    "Voltardo" <absinthe@.ambergris.wow> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thank to all for your responses. All the solutions were good ones.
    > Thank again!
    >




    btw:
    if you can use a record player (ie: electronic) it will put a lot less wear
    and tear
    on your valuable 78's than the mechanical tone arm with those steel needles.

    if you use a simple wave (.wav) recorder
    there is software for converting it to .mp3 format
    which can them be played on a standard cd player

    i recently cut 4 cd fulls if my 78's!
     
    philo, Sep 24, 2004
    #6
  7. Voltardo wrote:

    > Greetings,
    >
    > My great grandfather gave me his prized victrola music player, 78 rpm,
    > wind-up motor, huge brass speaker made in the shape of a morning glory
    > blossom, beauiful. It must have been desighed by a genius. the sound
    > pick-up is on the opposite end of the speaker and uses a rather thick,
    > pointed pin that passes over the media where it must decode and play the
    > sounds. Isn't this exciting?! I don't think I'll ever fully understand
    > it, it is so complicated, however, I would like to rescue the music from
    > the disks, if possible, by burning then to cd. Can this be done? If you
    > can help, I will give you a copy of "Happy Trails To You" sung by the
    > silver throated pair, Dale Evans and Roy Rogers.


    In addition to the other suggestions:

    If your records are that old (recorded before 1923-1925 or so), the sound
    waves being recorded physically produced the impression of their wave forms
    on the recording medium, using an exponential horn to amplify them but
    otherwise with no electrical assistance--that not being available at the
    time.. (This is called "acoustic recording.") The chances are that the
    modulation on the medium is therefore in a vertical, not lateral direction
    (although some acoustic recordings did have lateral modulation), and you
    will benefit greatly by purchasing a cartridge designed to respond only to
    vertical modulation. However, you mention the Roy Rogers/Dale Evans record,
    which is considerably newer than that and therefore electrically recorded.
    You need to do some research in order to discover the proper method for
    transfering these recordings. Good luck.
    --
    Gary G. Taylor * Rialto, CA
    gary at donavan dot org / http:// geetee dot donavan dot org
    www.howtofixcomputers.com.is.bogus.horseshit
    "The two most abundant things in the universe
    are hydrogen and stupidity." --Harlan Ellison
     
    Gary G. Taylor, Sep 25, 2004
    #7
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