Burn in on LCD monitor

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by rfdjr1@optonline.net, Oct 28, 2006.

  1. Guest

    The lighting must have been just right tonight, but I just now noticed that what
    I thought might have been some damage to my LCD monitor due to applying a little
    too much pressure while cleaning it is actually a shadow image of wallpaper I
    use almost exclusively on my screen. I didn't realize that wallpaper could burn
    an image, even a faint one, onto the screen. The monitor is a 19" ViewSonic, a
    little over a year old. Is this normal for an LCD monitor? Thanks.
     
    , Oct 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. Guest

    wrote:

    >The lighting must have been just right tonight, but I just now noticed that what
    >I thought might have been some damage to my LCD monitor due to applying a little
    >too much pressure while cleaning it is actually a shadow image of wallpaper I
    >use almost exclusively on my screen. I didn't realize that wallpaper could burn
    >an image, even a faint one, onto the screen. The monitor is a 19" ViewSonic, a
    >little over a year old. Is this normal for an LCD monitor? Thanks.


    There was a guy who bought a wide screen LCD TV, all he watched was
    sports. He's is suing a sports channel as their channel banner, which
    is always displayed in the lower right burn'd into the screen.
    --
    http://www.flurl.com/item/Best_DUI_Ever_u_197526
     
    , Oct 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest

    LCD monitors can have some retension from having the same image
    displayed on it for a very long period of time. LCD monitors do not
    burn in, as like CRT or Plasma technology.

    Temporarily remove the wall paper, and set the background colour to be
    black. Use a screen saver or better, use one that puts the screen to
    black instead of with an image.

    After several weeks you should notice a decrease in the noticable
    retension effect.

    Excellent article about LCD screen persistence (LCD image retension)
    http://compreviews.about.com/od/monitors/a/LCDBurnIn.htm


    Taken from the above link:
    _________________________________________________


    Is it permanent?

    In most cases, no. The crystals do have a natural state and can shift
    depending upon the amount of current used to generate the desired
    color. As long as these colors do shift periodically, the crystals at
    that pixel should fluctuate enough such that the image will not be
    permanently imprinted into the crystals. Having said that, it is
    possible that the crystals could get a permanent memory if the screen
    image does not change at all and the screen is left on all the time. It
    is very unlikely for a consumer to have this happen as it is more
    likely to happen in a fixed display such as those seen as display
    boards for businesses that do not change.

    Can it be prevented/corrected?

    Yes, image persistence on LCD screens can be corrected in most cases
    and is easily prevented. Prevention of image persistence can be done
    through some of the following methods:

    Set the screen to turn off after a few minutes of screen idle time
    under the Power functions in Windows. Turning the monitor display off
    will prevent an image from being displayed on the screen for extended
    periods of time. Of course, this could be annoying to some people as
    the screen may go off more than they wish.
    Use a screen saver that either rotates, has moving graphic images or is
    blank. This also prevents an image for being displayed in screen for
    too long.
    Rotate any background images on the desktop. Background images are one
    of the most common causes for image persistence. By switching
    backgrounds every day or few days, it should reduce the change of
    persistence.
    Turn off the monitor when the system is not in use. This will prevent
    any problems where the screen saver or power function fails to turn off
    the screen and result in an image sitting on the screen for long times.

    Using these items can help prevent the image persistence problem from
    cropping up on a monitor. But what if the monitor is already displaying
    image persistence problems? Here are a few steps that can be used to
    try and correct it:

    Turn off the monitor for extended periods of time. It can be as little
    as several hours or it could be as long as several days.
    Use a screen saver with a rotating image and run it for extended
    periods of time. The rotating color palette should help remove the
    persistent image but it could take a long time.
    Run the screen with a single solid color or bright white for an
    extended period of time. This will cause all of the crystals to be
    reset at a single color setting and should erase and previous image
    persistence.
    Conclusions

    While LCDs don't have the same burn-in problem that affected CRTs, the
    image persistence problem could come about. Hopefully this article has
    addressed what the issue is, what causes it, how to prevent it and how
    to correct it. With all the preventative steps in place, a user should
    never really have to encounter this problem.

    __________________________________________________

    Understanding LCD Monitor Defects
    http://compreviews.about.com/od/multimedia/a/LCDPixelDefects.htm

    Understanding LCD Monitors
    http://compreviews.about.com/od/multimedia/a/LCDSpecs.htm


    Jerry G.
    ______



    wrote:
    > The lighting must have been just right tonight, but I just now noticed that what
    > I thought might have been some damage to my LCD monitor due to applying a little
    > too much pressure while cleaning it is actually a shadow image of wallpaper I
    > use almost exclusively on my screen. I didn't realize that wallpaper could burn
    > an image, even a faint one, onto the screen. The monitor is a 19" ViewSonic, a
    > little over a year old. Is this normal for an LCD monitor? Thanks.
     
    , Oct 28, 2006
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    > >The lighting must have been just right tonight, but I just now noticed that
    > >what
    > >I thought might have been some damage to my LCD monitor due to applying a
    > >little
    > >too much pressure while cleaning it is actually a shadow image of wallpaper
    > >I
    > >use almost exclusively on my screen. I didn't realize that wallpaper could
    > >burn
    > >an image, even a faint one, onto the screen. The monitor is a 19" ViewSonic,
    > >a
    > >little over a year old. Is this normal for an LCD monitor? Thanks.

    >
    > There was a guy who bought a wide screen LCD TV, all he watched was
    > sports. He's is suing a sports channel as their channel banner, which
    > is always displayed in the lower right burn'd into the screen.


    Shouldn't happen on LCDs, although I have seen it appear to do so - but
    watching something else for a while will fix it, so no permanent damage
    has been done. Plasma on the other hand... BLECH I will *NEVER* own
    one. Those DO burn in, and way too easily.

    Then again, I prefer the good 'ol CRT. Too bad it's being phased out :(
     
    David Matthew Wood, Oct 28, 2006
    #4
  5. Rich Wilson Guest

    "David Matthew Wood" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > wrote:
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >The lighting must have been just right tonight, but I just now noticed
    >> >that
    >> >what
    >> >I thought might have been some damage to my LCD monitor due to applying
    >> >a
    >> >little
    >> >too much pressure while cleaning it is actually a shadow image of
    >> >wallpaper
    >> >I
    >> >use almost exclusively on my screen. I didn't realize that wallpaper
    >> >could
    >> >burn
    >> >an image, even a faint one, onto the screen. The monitor is a 19"
    >> >ViewSonic,
    >> >a
    >> >little over a year old. Is this normal for an LCD monitor? Thanks.

    >>
    >> There was a guy who bought a wide screen LCD TV, all he watched was
    >> sports. He's is suing a sports channel as their channel banner, which
    >> is always displayed in the lower right burn'd into the screen.

    >
    > Shouldn't happen on LCDs, although I have seen it appear to do so - but
    > watching something else for a while will fix it, so no permanent damage
    > has been done. Plasma on the other hand... BLECH I will *NEVER* own
    > one. Those DO burn in, and way too easily.
    >
    > Then again, I prefer the good 'ol CRT. Too bad it's being phased out :(


    I refuse to buy either Plasma or LCD as I know that OLED will wipe the floor
    with them when it eventually emerges. I wish they'd hurry up though, they've
    been on their way for years now!
     
    Rich Wilson, Oct 28, 2006
    #5
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