Building a computer

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by chet, Jun 29, 2006.

  1. chet

    chet Guest

    For those of who mentioned building your own computer, that does sound
    like alot of fun, I went over to NewEgg.com and for the average person
    who was looking to the motherboards, cpu's, video cards, HD's, where is
    the world do you start, for example I was reading the reviews on
    motherboards, that alone is mind boggling anout sockets and getting the
    right CPU, if I went with building one, is the dual core technology the
    way to go these days, I were to order the components from NewEgg do they
    have knowledgeable people to make the right decisions so the parts will
    fit.

    thanks
    Chet

    PS I did put another 128meg of ram in my computer, the topic was " My
    computer is sluggish" it helped 100%
    chet, Jun 29, 2006
    #1
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  2. chet

    Duane Arnold Guest

    chet wrote:
    > For those of who mentioned building your own computer, that does sound
    > like alot of fun, I went over to NewEgg.com and for the average person
    > who was looking to the motherboards, cpu's, video cards, HD's, where is
    > the world do you start, for example I was reading the reviews on
    > motherboards, that alone is mind boggling anout sockets and getting the
    > right CPU, if I went with building one, is the dual core technology the
    > way to go these days, I were to order the components from NewEgg do they
    > have knowledgeable people to make the right decisions so the parts will
    > fit.


    I like to use TigerDirect myself. There are going to be people that will
    post about Tiger this and Tiger that. I never had a problem.

    There are what are called *barebones* solutions that have case, memory,
    cpu and some other things in a package. You have to buy the other parts
    like HDD, more memory, CD, and DVD etc, etc and put it in yourself. All
    palaces have staff tech(s) that will assist you on a phone call.

    For home usage, dual core is not going to buy you anything I think as
    most programs for home usage will not use the dual core technology.
    Business applications that crunch numbers for statistics programs of
    the type will be programmed to use the technology.

    Duane :)
    Duane Arnold, Jun 29, 2006
    #2
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  3. chet

    Rob Guest

    "chet" <> wrote in message
    news:KiFog.52$...
    > For those of who mentioned building your own computer, that does sound
    > like alot of fun, I went over to NewEgg.com and for the average person who
    > was looking to the motherboards, cpu's, video cards, HD's, where is the
    > world do you start, for example I was reading the reviews on motherboards,
    > that alone is mind boggling anout sockets and getting the right CPU, if I
    > went with building one, is the dual core technology the way to go these
    > days, I were to order the components from NewEgg do they have
    > knowledgeable people to make the right decisions so the parts will fit.
    >
    > thanks
    > Chet
    >
    > PS I did put another 128meg of ram in my computer, the topic was " My
    > computer is sluggish" it helped 100%


    Newegg is a excellent company but they send what you buy. Best way is to
    look at "socket". An AMD socket 939 cpu will only work on a socket 939
    motherboard. So you buy a 939 m/b and look and see what kind of memory it
    supports and buy that. See if it has a PCI-E slot or perhaps a AGP slot and
    buy a video card that matches. Simply put...the motherboard determines what
    other parts you buy.

    Rob
    Rob, Jun 29, 2006
    #3
  4. chet

    RjK Guest

    Wait a few weeks before buying anything. AMD is going to have a drastic
    price cut when intel comes out with their dual core CPU.
    I believe it is around July 23. I like newegg because they are low cost and
    very fast delivery.



    "chet" <> wrote in message
    news:KiFog.52$...
    > For those of who mentioned building your own computer, that does sound
    > like alot of fun, I went over to NewEgg.com and for the average person who
    > was looking to the motherboards, cpu's, video cards, HD's, where is the
    > world do you start, for example I was reading the reviews on motherboards,
    > that alone is mind boggling anout sockets and getting the right CPU, if I
    > went with building one, is the dual core technology the way to go these
    > days, I were to order the components from NewEgg do they have
    > knowledgeable people to make the right decisions so the parts will fit.
    >
    > thanks
    > Chet
    >
    > PS I did put another 128meg of ram in my computer, the topic was " My
    > computer is sluggish" it helped 100%
    RjK, Jun 29, 2006
    #4
  5. chet

    JDL Guest

    chet <> wrote in news:KiFog.52$:

    > For those of who mentioned building your own computer, that does sound
    > like alot of fun, I went over to NewEgg.com and for the average person
    > who was looking to the motherboards, cpu's, video cards, HD's, where

    is
    > the world do you start, for example I was reading the reviews on
    > motherboards, that alone is mind boggling anout sockets and getting

    the
    > right CPU, if I went with building one, is the dual core technology

    the
    > way to go these days, I were to order the components from NewEgg do

    they
    > have knowledgeable people to make the right decisions so the parts

    will
    > fit.
    >
    > thanks
    > Chet
    >
    > PS I did put another 128meg of ram in my computer, the topic was " My
    > computer is sluggish" it helped 100%



    Like someone else said, the motherboard, or mobo, sets the stage for the
    other components. It'll be ATX, micro ATX, or BTX. The mobo will
    determine what socket CPU you can use, what kind of RAM, video card,
    case, etc.. Newegg has detailed specs listed for each mobo, so buying
    compatable parts is easy. The mobo you pick will determine the final
    PC's price/performance. If you want an el cheapo (but still decent for
    most tasks except high end gaming), you can get a Biostar or MSI mobo
    with built in video, sound, LAN card for like $50 or so. Then add HDD,
    DVD-RW, case, RAM, etc.. Or get a mid-grade mobo and add moderately
    better components. Or for high end PC's, get like a $120 Asus mobo and
    add even better components. Also, if you have parts laying around like
    hard drives, you can use those and save money, unless they're old/slow
    parts that you don't want in your new machine. The manual you get with
    your new mobo will show you how to build the system, and there's always
    the internet for reference. It's easy.

    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
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    JDL, Jun 29, 2006
    #5
  6. chet

    Uplink Guest

    Don't use newegg, I would buy the components new (as I will when I
    build my system), because then you know they actually work, unlike
    newegg.com

    JDL wrote:
    > chet <> wrote in news:KiFog.52$:
    >
    > > For those of who mentioned building your own computer, that does sound
    > > like alot of fun, I went over to NewEgg.com and for the average person
    > > who was looking to the motherboards, cpu's, video cards, HD's, where

    > is
    > > the world do you start, for example I was reading the reviews on
    > > motherboards, that alone is mind boggling anout sockets and getting

    > the
    > > right CPU, if I went with building one, is the dual core technology

    > the
    > > way to go these days, I were to order the components from NewEgg do

    > they
    > > have knowledgeable people to make the right decisions so the parts

    > will
    > > fit.
    > >
    > > thanks
    > > Chet
    > >
    > > PS I did put another 128meg of ram in my computer, the topic was " My
    > > computer is sluggish" it helped 100%

    >
    >
    > Like someone else said, the motherboard, or mobo, sets the stage for the
    > other components. It'll be ATX, micro ATX, or BTX. The mobo will
    > determine what socket CPU you can use, what kind of RAM, video card,
    > case, etc.. Newegg has detailed specs listed for each mobo, so buying
    > compatable parts is easy. The mobo you pick will determine the final
    > PC's price/performance. If you want an el cheapo (but still decent for
    > most tasks except high end gaming), you can get a Biostar or MSI mobo
    > with built in video, sound, LAN card for like $50 or so. Then add HDD,
    > DVD-RW, case, RAM, etc.. Or get a mid-grade mobo and add moderately
    > better components. Or for high end PC's, get like a $120 Asus mobo and
    > add even better components. Also, if you have parts laying around like
    > hard drives, you can use those and save money, unless they're old/slow
    > parts that you don't want in your new machine. The manual you get with
    > your new mobo will show you how to build the system, and there's always
    > the internet for reference. It's easy.
    >
    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    > http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    > ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
    Uplink, Jun 30, 2006
    #6
  7. chet

    Brian Guest

    I agree with all the other posts and it seems that NewEgg is the favorite.
    The motherboard does determine what other components will be added. No one
    mentioned upgradeability though. My rule of thumb when building systems is
    this: How much are you planning to spend?
    Can I get one step down for processor speed in my price range? (never buy
    the latest ..too expensive and no real performance enhancements for the
    average user)
    Most motherboards are made from the same components. Look for features like
    max processor speed and get the one that supports the fastest possible speed
    in your price range. You don't have to buy the fastest processor to put on
    the board but when the price comes down later it is upgradable. Same holds
    true for memory, get the board with the fastest support and the most GB in
    your price range add memory as you can afford it.
    Video is the next most important item for system performance. Onboard video
    is never a good chioce if you can help it. AGP supports most games and PCIe
    is the latest trend and can support multiple cards if needed...if the
    motherboard has both great get the AGP and upgrade later when you can to
    PCIe if needed. Check the chipsets and pick the one that does what you want
    to do the best usually ATI or NVIDIA. The card does not have to be made by
    those two but the chipset you want is what is important ie FX5500, Rage128,
    etc then get the one with the most memory for the price.
    Save enough for HDD space. These days HDD's are pretty inexpensive and 200Gb
    is not uncommon for necessary space. If you can, get two drives or more. One
    for the OS and the others for everything else...If you have to reload the OS
    you dont loose all your information..also good to upgrade to RAID
    later..always think upgrade...
    What you are adding to the system or may want to add later will determine
    the case. Get the Biggest powersupply you can get anything less than 350
    Watts is a waste of time and money (350 is the VERY lowest that I would
    recommend) Look at the features of the case and make sure you like the looks
    ...you will probably have it around awhile so you should like it.
    I try to add two optical drives one a burner the other plain jane use the
    plain jane as the workhorse and the burner just as a burner..cheaper that
    way and you have a backup in case the other goes out until you can get
    another If you cant get two get the burner

    There is many more items to get into but if you start there and think in
    that fashion on each component you will build a great system at the best
    price in no time that will be able to handle any new tecnology or program
    that comes out for the next few years
    Hope that helps

    Brian
    P.S. Read the buyer reviews at NewEgg they are very helpful in determining
    which components to buy.

    "chet" <> wrote in message
    news:KiFog.52$...
    For those of who mentioned building your own computer, that does sound
    like alot of fun, I went over to NewEgg.com and for the average person
    who was looking to the motherboards, cpu's, video cards, HD's, where is
    the world do you start, for example I was reading the reviews on
    motherboards, that alone is mind boggling anout sockets and getting the
    right CPU, if I went with building one, is the dual core technology the
    way to go these days, I were to order the components from NewEgg do they
    have knowledgeable people to make the right decisions so the parts will
    fit.

    thanks
    Chet

    PS I did put another 128meg of ram in my computer, the topic was " My
    computer is sluggish" it helped 100%
    Brian, Jun 30, 2006
    #7
  8. chet

    Rob Guest

    Huh??? I have bought thousands of dollars worth of computer parts through
    Newegg, all were new, a few were bad which I had no trouble exchanging. I
    even bought my sons' Xbox 360 through Newegg. Great company that sells NEW
    components.


    "Uplink" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Don't use newegg, I would buy the components new (as I will when I
    > build my system), because then you know they actually work, unlike
    > newegg.com
    >
    > JDL wrote:
    >> chet <> wrote in news:KiFog.52$:
    >>
    >> > For those of who mentioned building your own computer, that does sound
    >> > like alot of fun, I went over to NewEgg.com and for the average person
    >> > who was looking to the motherboards, cpu's, video cards, HD's, where

    >> is
    >> > the world do you start, for example I was reading the reviews on
    >> > motherboards, that alone is mind boggling anout sockets and getting

    >> the
    >> > right CPU, if I went with building one, is the dual core technology

    >> the
    >> > way to go these days, I were to order the components from NewEgg do

    >> they
    >> > have knowledgeable people to make the right decisions so the parts

    >> will
    >> > fit.
    >> >
    >> > thanks
    >> > Chet
    >> >
    >> > PS I did put another 128meg of ram in my computer, the topic was " My
    >> > computer is sluggish" it helped 100%

    >>
    >>
    >> Like someone else said, the motherboard, or mobo, sets the stage for the
    >> other components. It'll be ATX, micro ATX, or BTX. The mobo will
    >> determine what socket CPU you can use, what kind of RAM, video card,
    >> case, etc.. Newegg has detailed specs listed for each mobo, so buying
    >> compatable parts is easy. The mobo you pick will determine the final
    >> PC's price/performance. If you want an el cheapo (but still decent for
    >> most tasks except high end gaming), you can get a Biostar or MSI mobo
    >> with built in video, sound, LAN card for like $50 or so. Then add HDD,
    >> DVD-RW, case, RAM, etc.. Or get a mid-grade mobo and add moderately
    >> better components. Or for high end PC's, get like a $120 Asus mobo and
    >> add even better components. Also, if you have parts laying around like
    >> hard drives, you can use those and save money, unless they're old/slow
    >> parts that you don't want in your new machine. The manual you get with
    >> your new mobo will show you how to build the system, and there's always
    >> the internet for reference. It's easy.
    >>
    >> ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet
    >> News==----
    >> http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+
    >> Newsgroups
    >> ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption
    >> =----

    >
    Rob, Jun 30, 2006
    #8
  9. chet

    Michael-NC Guest

    "Uplink" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Don't use newegg, I would buy the components new (as I will when I
    > build my system), because then you know they actually work, unlike
    > newegg.com



    Newegg is simply the best online store for computer related purchases.

    The ratings they have speak for themselves.

    http://www.resellerratings.com/seller2121.html



    Newegg...

    We speak your name!
    Michael-NC, Jun 30, 2006
    #9
  10. chet

    JDL Guest

    "Michael-NC" <> wrote in news:9M%og.6096$so3.850
    @southeast.rr.com:

    >
    > "Uplink" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Don't use newegg, I would buy the components new (as I will when I
    >> build my system), because then you know they actually work, unlike
    >> newegg.com

    >
    >
    > Newegg is simply the best online store for computer related purchases.
    >
    > The ratings they have speak for themselves.
    >
    > http://www.resellerratings.com/seller2121.html
    >
    >
    >
    > Newegg...
    >
    > We speak your name!
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >


    Yeah, newegg's a nerd's wet dream. What makes their store so great are
    all the customer reviews you can read, and also the detailed specs of
    each component. Plus the fast shipping. Imagine working in the
    warehouse dept. of newegg? Salivating over all those stacks and stacks
    of $300 Asus mobo's, $300 ATI video cards, etc.. Pure torture.

    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----
    JDL, Jun 30, 2006
    #10
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