budding photographer

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by chris.bartlett88@yahoo.com.au, Dec 4, 2008.

  1. Guest

    HI All,

    Hoping I can lean on your experience a bit. I have a young daughter
    who has been a bit of a freak when it comes to cameras. Whenever she
    picks one up and takes a photo they always come out, well "Wow" is a
    common phrase used to describe her shots. I used to put it down to
    luck but it happens too many times and have had too many comments from
    people.

    Anyway, I want to encourage this talent/luck/skill and buy her a new
    camera for Christmas. I did some research and as a complete
    photography Neanderthal didn’t make much headway in narrowing down
    choices. Going to the local stores revealed an extremely high number
    of units available coinciding with a complete lack of knowledge, other
    than how much you want to spend, and then a camera appearing at the
    upper end of my range. (One salesperson even going so far as to say
    you can’t go wrong with these canons, unfortunately, it was a Nikon he
    had delivered to me)

    My plan is to get her a P&S camera and get her into it a bit more. In
    the future if she is still keen I will get her a DSLR type
    arrangement, which if I am reading right is more accessory oriented
    with things such as lenses etc. and requires more technical knowledge.

    I will be taking her to the local store and will let her handle
    various ones but need to come up with a list of options to start with.
    My requirements don’t seem to meet the commercial methods of marketing
    such as how much or how many MP's so will give my requirements the
    only way I know how.

    Can anyone with experience with cameras matching these criteria give
    their recommendations for P&S cameras to try?

    1) P*S price range. If I can get a reasonable DSLR for the same money
    it’s too much.
    2) Able to handle a teenager. While she is good at handling equipment
    she does have four younger siblings and holidays can be a bit chaotic.
    So any fragile units are out.
    3) Full auto default operation but with capability to manually set
    options if she wants to explore.
    4) Photos to be printed will be standard 4"x6" (10cmx15cm) 99% of the
    time. Although she's expressed an interest in experimenting with
    8"x10" in the future.
    5) Some video capability but not important to be latest and greatest.
    She is more into pictures. Video is for more adhoc light fun stuff.
    6) Technology doesn’t scare her but prefer not to overwhelm her
    either, she is still learning after all.
    7) Camera size/bulk, prettiness, fashion attributes no important. She
    tends to always prefer function over form in her electronic equipment.

    Would appreciate any advice or wisdom you can offer.
     
    , Dec 4, 2008
    #1
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  2. SMS Guest

    wrote:
    > HI All,


    > Would appreciate any advice or wisdom you can offer.


    You can quickly narrow down the possible choices based on those
    criteria, especially the manual modes.

    Go to "http://dcresource.com/reviews/cameraList.php" and select "Fixed
    Lens," "Under $200," and tick the boxes for AF-assist lamp, Image
    stabilizer, Manual exposure, and "Optical/electronic viewfinder."

    The only two models left to consider are the Canon PowerShot A590 IS and
    the Nikon CoolPix P60.

    Of those two, I'd choose the A590 IS. Actually, if you can find the
    older A570 IS, which is the same, but with 7.1 megapixels instead of 8
    megapixels, get that one, but it's discontinued. The A570 IS has better
    video, and with larger pixels is less noisy.

    In the U.S., the A590 IS sells for as little as $102, which is an
    incredible deal for such a capable camera. There's nothing else with an
    optical viewfinder, image stabilization, and manual exposure that can
    touch it. I think that with so many people wanting very small cameras,
    the A series is overlooked. It's larger than the ultra-compacts, and it
    lacks a Li-Ion battery and charger, but it has capabilities that the
    smaller cameras can't match.

    Also, you can install the temporary CHDK firmware hack on the camera for
    increased control. CHDK adds a lot of the firmware features of D-SLRs to
    Canon P&S cameras. Some of the stuff in the CHDK firmware is useful,
    some is fun, and some is dumb. Being able to shoot in RAW mode may be
    something that's of value, and I find the histogram and grid lines to be
    useful as well. Of course CHDK it doesn't fix the slow auto-focus or
    high ISO issues, because these are inherent to the camera design; those
    will have to wait until she graduates to a D-SLR.

    Above all, don't buy anything without an optical viewfinder. My daughter
    got so used to the advantages of an optical viewfinder, then her school
    journalism teacher bought some cheap digital cameras that lacked a
    viewfinder and she was really complaining about how hard they were to
    use outside in the sun. You don't realize how wonderful it is, until
    it's not there.
     
    SMS, Dec 4, 2008
    #2
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  3. tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 4 Dec 2008 04:48:12 -0800 (PST),
    wrote:

    >HI All,
    >
    >Hoping I can lean on your experience a bit. I have a young daughter
    >who has been a bit of a freak when it comes to cameras. Whenever she
    >picks one up and takes a photo they always come out, well "Wow" is a
    >common phrase used to describe her shots. I used to put it down to
    >luck but it happens too many times and have had too many comments from
    >people.
    >
    >1) P*S price range. If I can get a reasonable DSLR for the same money
    >it’s too much.


    You will be able to get a good P&S for under $200, but the minimum
    outlay for a dslr is about $600 when you add a bag, sales tax, and a
    decent-sized SD card.

    When my daughter was in high school, she was interested in
    photography. I bought her a 35mm slr (this was before digital).
    She's still into photography, owns a dslr, makes a nice side income
    from her photography, is active in a camera club, enters competitions,
    and was just invited to hang some of her work in local gallery.

    Your daughter can learn photography with a P&S since composition and
    the ability to see a photographic opportunity is an operator function
    and not a camera function. The best, most expensive, camera doesn't
    take good pictures unless the user has the ability to see a scene and
    compose it.

    Owning a dslr, though, encourages the user to use the mechanical part
    of the process of photography to the fullest. The dslr has more
    capability than the P&S. The really interested young photographers
    will push themselves to learn more about photography when they have
    equipment that can be used to do more than just capture what's in
    front of it.

    If your daughter shows interest in learning about photography (not
    just taking snapshots), taking classes in photography, joining the
    school camera club, and taking photographs of scenes and things that
    are not just friends and family, I'd go straight to dslr.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Dec 4, 2008
    #3
  4. Don Stauffer Guest

    wrote:
    > HI All,
    >
    > Hoping I can lean on your experience a bit. I have a young daughter
    > who has been a bit of a freak when it comes to cameras. Whenever she
    > picks one up and takes a photo they always come out, well "Wow" is a
    > common phrase used to describe her shots. I used to put it down to
    > luck but it happens too many times and have had too many comments from
    > people.
    >
    > Anyway, I want to encourage this talent/luck/skill and buy her a new
    > camera for Christmas. I did some research and as a complete
    > photography Neanderthal didn’t make much headway in narrowing down
    > choices. Going to the local stores revealed an extremely high number
    > of units available coinciding with a complete lack of knowledge, other
    > than how much you want to spend, and then a camera appearing at the
    > upper end of my range. (One salesperson even going so far as to say
    > you can’t go wrong with these canons, unfortunately, it was a Nikon he
    > had delivered to me)
    >
    > My plan is to get her a P&S camera and get her into it a bit more. In
    > the future if she is still keen I will get her a DSLR type
    > arrangement, which if I am reading right is more accessory oriented
    > with things such as lenses etc. and requires more technical knowledge.
    >
    > I will be taking her to the local store and will let her handle
    > various ones but need to come up with a list of options to start with.
    > My requirements don’t seem to meet the commercial methods of marketing
    > such as how much or how many MP's so will give my requirements the
    > only way I know how.
    >


    I second your idea. It is important to foster good "seeing" when they
    are young, the technical skills can come later. Young kids frequently
    see things differently and uniquely, and that is what they should be
    concentrating on. If photography catches on with them, they will then
    want to do fancier things that demand more manual control, including
    perspective and such.

    Is there a camera club in your area that you and your daughter can join?
    That way your daughter can see what others are doing. Youngsters soak up
    this kind of thing in a big way.
     
    Don Stauffer, Dec 4, 2008
    #4
  5. SMS Guest

    tony cooper wrote:

    > You will be able to get a good P&S for under $200, but the minimum
    > outlay for a dslr is about $600 when you add a bag, sales tax, and a
    > decent-sized SD card.


    Nah, you can get a Nikon D40 with the kit lens for $410 at Amazon. SD
    cards are dirt cheap, an 8GB SDHC card is less than $15. A decent D-SLR
    camera bag is $20 from Amazon. There's no tax (well you're supposed to
    send the tax in on your own in most states). You can get started for
    less than $450.

    > Owning a dslr, though, encourages the user to use the mechanical part
    > of the process of photography to the fullest. The dslr has more
    > capability than the P&S. The really interested young photographers
    > will push themselves to learn more about photography when they have
    > equipment that can be used to do more than just capture what's in
    > front of it.
    >
    > If your daughter shows interest in learning about photography (not
    > just taking snapshots), taking classes in photography, joining the
    > school camera club, and taking photographs of scenes and things that
    > are not just friends and family, I'd go straight to dslr.


    All true. The P&S is fun, but you won't learn the intricacies of
    lighting, depth of field, focusing, ISO speeds, apertures, etc. You
    need an SLR for that.
     
    SMS, Dec 4, 2008
    #5
  6. tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 09:40:34 -0800, SMS <>
    wrote:

    >tony cooper wrote:
    >
    >> You will be able to get a good P&S for under $200, but the minimum
    >> outlay for a dslr is about $600 when you add a bag, sales tax, and a
    >> decent-sized SD card.

    >
    >Nah, you can get a Nikon D40 with the kit lens for $410 at Amazon. SD
    >cards are dirt cheap, an 8GB SDHC card is less than $15. A decent D-SLR
    >camera bag is $20 from Amazon. There's no tax (well you're supposed to
    >send the tax in on your own in most states). You can get started for
    >less than $450.


    I own a D40, and I purchased it online. However, I'm assuming that
    the OP isn't an experienced camera shopper and will buy in a store.
    He should. He needs the advice available from a knowledgeable camera
    store person. The D40 is going for $449 at the local good camera
    store, and tax takes it to $477. Add a bag and whatever else the guy
    walks out with, and he's around $500 or $525. I don't think you lead
    the guy to think he can get in the dslrs for less than $450 unless
    he's a knowledge buyer.

    While I own a D40, I think I'd steer this user to a Pentax because of
    lens capability. The daughter will find adding lenses to be cheaper
    in the long run.

    >> Owning a dslr, though, encourages the user to use the mechanical part
    >> of the process of photography to the fullest. The dslr has more
    >> capability than the P&S. The really interested young photographers
    >> will push themselves to learn more about photography when they have
    >> equipment that can be used to do more than just capture what's in
    >> front of it.
    >>
    >> If your daughter shows interest in learning about photography (not
    >> just taking snapshots), taking classes in photography, joining the
    >> school camera club, and taking photographs of scenes and things that
    >> are not just friends and family, I'd go straight to dslr.

    >
    >All true. The P&S is fun, but you won't learn the intricacies of
    >lighting, depth of field, focusing, ISO speeds, apertures, etc. You
    >need an SLR for that.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Dec 4, 2008
    #6
  7. tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 12:15:56 -0600, chad-gleason
    <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 09:40:34 -0800, SMS <> wrote:
    >
    >>tony cooper wrote:
    >>
    >>> You will be able to get a good P&S for under $200, but the minimum
    >>> outlay for a dslr is about $600 when you add a bag, sales tax, and a
    >>> decent-sized SD card.

    >>
    >>Nah, you can get a Nikon D40 with the kit lens for $410 at Amazon. SD
    >>cards are dirt cheap, an 8GB SDHC card is less than $15. A decent D-SLR
    >>camera bag is $20 from Amazon. There's no tax (well you're supposed to
    >>send the tax in on your own in most states). You can get started for
    >>less than $450.

    >
    >See point #4 below. DSLR + Kit lens = con-artist routine. That $410 investment
    >is going to cost you over $5000 to bring it up to the image quality obtained
    >from any decent P&S camera.


    It's one thing to try to fool experienced photographers with this
    bullshit, but you shouldn't try to fool the inexperienced. They
    actually might believe you.



    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Dec 4, 2008
    #7
  8. Guest

    Thanks to all for the advice. It was very useful. I will look out for
    the 470IS model. And check out the Nikon specified.As an FYI, the
    three I had already identified as options are the, Canon A490IS, Sony
    Cyber-shot W150 and Panasonic Lumix LZ8. Your input of course is worth
    more than my attempts.

    BTW: I'll upgrade myself from Neanderthal to a Photography Cro-Magnon.
    Since the A490IS was one that was at the top of my list for a while.
    The 2 things that always nagged me about it was some people saying
    10secs recharge time after flash (although most review sites indicate
    half of this) and the fact that it is so cheap ~US75$ at the moment.
    Some of my fears are eased.

    Re actually learning photography. My daughter has asked about clubs
    however, those we have checked out dont cater to kids. (If anyone does
    know of clubs in Sydney where teens are welcome let us know). So we
    are kind of stuck for now with library books, internet forums and her
    getting actual experience, which this camera will help her do.

    Again, thanks for your input.
     
    , Dec 4, 2008
    #8
  9. Guest

    On Dec 5, 10:51 am, wrote:
    > Thanks to all for the advice. It was very useful. I will look out for
    > the 470IS model. And check out the Nikon specified.As an FYI, the
    > three I had already identified as options are the, Canon A490IS, Sony
    > Cyber-shot W150 and Panasonic Lumix LZ8. Your input of course is worth
    > more than my attempts.
    >
    > BTW: I'll upgrade myself from Neanderthal to a Photography Cro-Magnon.
    > Since the A490IS was one that was at the top of my list for a while.
    > The 2 things that always nagged me about it was some people saying
    > 10secs recharge time after flash (although most review sites indicate
    > half of this) and the fact that it is so cheap ~US75$ at the moment.
    > Some of my fears are eased.
    >
    > Re actually learning photography. My daughter has asked about clubs
    > however, those we have checked out dont cater to kids. (If anyone does
    > know of clubs in Sydney where teens are welcome let us know). So we
    > are kind of stuck for now with library books, internet forums and her
    > getting actual experience, which this camera will help her do.
    >
    > Again, thanks for your input.


    Oops..Where I say 470 read 570, where I say 490 read 590. I havent had
    my coffee yet. Sorry for any confusion.
     
    , Dec 4, 2008
    #9
  10. chad-gleason <> wrote:
    >On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 09:40:34 -0800, SMS <> wrote:
    >
    >>tony cooper wrote:
    >>
    >>> You will be able to get a good P&S for under $200, but the minimum
    >>> outlay for a dslr is about $600 when you add a bag, sales tax, and a
    >>> decent-sized SD card.

    >>
    >>Nah, you can get a Nikon D40 with the kit lens for $410 at Amazon. SD
    >>cards are dirt cheap, an 8GB SDHC card is less than $15. A decent D-SLR
    >>camera bag is $20 from Amazon. There's no tax (well you're supposed to
    >>send the tax in on your own in most states). You can get started for
    >>less than $450.

    >
    >See point #4 below. DSLR + Kit lens = con-artist routine. That $410 investment
    >is going to cost you over $5000 to bring it up to the image quality obtained
    >from any decent P&S camera.


    Bullshit.
    To the OP: please see Chad's previous posting in this group for some
    good hints about how trustworthy his advice is.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Dec 5, 2008
    #10
  11. davin-o'conner <> wrote:
    >On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 16:25:24 -0800, Jürgen Exner <> wrote:
    >
    >>chad-gleason <> wrote:
    >>>On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 09:40:34 -0800, SMS <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>tony cooper wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> You will be able to get a good P&S for under $200, but the minimum
    >>>>> outlay for a dslr is about $600 when you add a bag, sales tax, and a
    >>>>> decent-sized SD card.
    >>>>
    >>>>Nah, you can get a Nikon D40 with the kit lens for $410 at Amazon. SD
    >>>>cards are dirt cheap, an 8GB SDHC card is less than $15. A decent D-SLR
    >>>>camera bag is $20 from Amazon. There's no tax (well you're supposed to
    >>>>send the tax in on your own in most states). You can get started for
    >>>>less than $450.
    >>>
    >>>See point #4 below. DSLR + Kit lens = con-artist routine. That $410 investment
    >>>is going to cost you over $5000 to bring it up to the image quality obtained
    >>>from any decent P&S camera.

    >>
    >>Bullshit.
    >>To the OP: please see Chad's previous posting in this group for some
    >>good hints about how trustworthy his advice is.

    >
    >Many (new & improved) points outlined below completely disprove your usual


    Please see Davin's posting history and the quality of his previous
    postings for some good hints about how trustworthy his advise is.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Dec 5, 2008
    #11
  12. DRS Guest

    "SMS" <> wrote in message
    news:SBUZk.8528$x%
    > tony cooper wrote:
    >
    >> You will be able to get a good P&S for under $200, but the minimum
    >> outlay for a dslr is about $600 when you add a bag, sales tax, and a
    >> decent-sized SD card.

    >
    > Nah, you can get a Nikon D40 with the kit lens for $410 at Amazon. SD
    > cards are dirt cheap, an 8GB SDHC card is less than $15. A decent
    > D-SLR camera bag is $20 from Amazon. There's no tax (well you're
    > supposed to send the tax in on your own in most states). You can get
    > started for less than $450.


    The OP has a .au address so American prices aren't particularly helpful.

    [...]

    > All true. The P&S is fun, but you won't learn the intricacies of
    > lighting, depth of field, focusing, ISO speeds, apertures, etc. You
    > need an SLR for that.


    The upper-end P&S (eg Canon G10) do all those things.
     
    DRS, Dec 5, 2008
    #12
  13. SMS Guest

    wrote:
    > Thanks to all for the advice. It was very useful. I will look out for
    > the 470IS model. And check out the Nikon specified.As an FYI, the
    > three I had already identified as options are the, Canon A490IS, Sony
    > Cyber-shot W150 and Panasonic Lumix LZ8. Your input of course is worth
    > more than my attempts.
    >
    > BTW: I'll upgrade myself from Neanderthal to a Photography Cro-Magnon.
    > Since the A490IS was one that was at the top of my list for a while.
    > The 2 things that always nagged me about it was some people saying
    > 10secs recharge time after flash (although most review sites indicate
    > half of this) and the fact that it is so cheap ~US75$ at the moment.
    > Some of my fears are eased.


    Where is the 590IS $75? I'll buy five! The cheapest I've seen it in the
    U.S. is $102.
     
    SMS, Dec 5, 2008
    #13
  14. tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 16:56:29 -0800, SMS <>
    wrote:

    >tony cooper wrote:
    >
    >> I own a D40, and I purchased it online. However, I'm assuming that
    >> the OP isn't an experienced camera shopper and will buy in a store.
    >> He should. He needs the advice available from a knowledgeable camera
    >> store person.

    >
    >What are the chances of him finding such a person? Virtually nil.


    That quite depends. The clerks at Colonial Photo & Hobby in Orlando
    are extremely knowledgeable and helpful. The store has been in
    business for 54 years. Reps from the various companies routinely
    visit the store and provide additional training.

    The smaller Harmon Photo in Orlando also has knowledgeable and helpful
    people. Just recently, one of them gave a presentation at the Orlando
    Camera Club to over 150 people, took all questions, and answered all
    very well indeed.

    Ritz Camera is a bit different. The clerks there seem knowledgeable
    about the products, but they provide direct answers to direct
    questions and don't - as they do at Colonial and Harmon - go beyond
    the specific question.

    > Even
    >at the single good camera store in my area, they would not spend any
    >time on someone buying a D40, it'd take too much time away from
    >important things like gabbing with the Canon and Nikon reps that visit
    >the store.


    That's completely the opposite of what I've experienced at Colonial
    and Harmon. I was in Colonial earlier today. I didn't pay that much
    attention, but I think there were five or six clerks in the camera
    department. At least five, maybe more than six. They're easy to
    approach and will spend as much time with you as you need.

    I can't promise that the OP will get good help from his camera store
    anymore than you can say it can't be obtained from a camera store.
    It's a good way to start, though.

    >> The D40 is going for $449 at the local good camera
    >> store, and tax takes it to $477. Add a bag and whatever else the guy
    >> walks out with, and he's around $500 or $525. I don't think you lead
    >> the guy to think he can get in the dslrs for less than $450 unless
    >> he's a knowledge buyer.

    >
    >That's why he came here for advice.


    The problem with obtaining your information from a newsgroup is the
    novice has to know what questions to ask. And he usually doesn't.
    The newsgroups are a good way to *add* to information, and a good
    source to verify what the camera store guy claims, but it's not a good
    starting point.

    >Remember the times before this group
    >became one uninformed person posting his incorrect information on P&S
    >cameras over and over again? When you filter him out, there's still some
    >knowledgeable people giving useful information.


    No question about that. Those of us already into photography can gain
    a great deal. The novice, though, is confused by the Canon vs Nikon
    bullshit, the overly-technical (for him) gearhead threads, and can't
    tell the P&S troll from the really useful sources.


    >When I purchased my
    >first film SLR back in the 1990's, Usenet was invaluable. I would never
    >have learned about the differences between what Canon was offering in
    >Europe (and gray-marketing here) and the de-featured U.S. models.
    >
    >> While I own a D40, I think I'd steer this user to a Pentax because of
    >> lens capability. The daughter will find adding lenses to be cheaper
    >> in the long run.

    >
    >I doubt it. With Nikon there are tons of used lenses available.


    You see, you're here, you're reading, and you're not paying attention.
    The D40 lens choices are limited. Not all Nikon lenses work with the
    D40 as far as providing all functions. Only AS-S DX lenses are fully
    functional with a D40. That's been covered here, but you missed it.
    They'd tell you this at Colonial or Harmon.






    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Dec 5, 2008
    #14
  15. DRS Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:

    [...]

    > Re actually learning photography. My daughter has asked about clubs
    > however, those we have checked out dont cater to kids. (If anyone does
    > know of clubs in Sydney where teens are welcome let us know).


    You might have better luck asking in aus.photo.
     
    DRS, Dec 5, 2008
    #15
  16. nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > >> While I own a D40, I think I'd steer this user to a Pentax because of
    > >> lens capability. The daughter will find adding lenses to be cheaper
    > >> in the long run.

    > >
    > >I doubt it. With Nikon there are tons of used lenses available.

    >
    > You see, you're here, you're reading, and you're not paying attention.
    > The D40 lens choices are limited. Not all Nikon lenses work with the
    > D40 as far as providing all functions. Only AS-S DX lenses are fully
    > functional with a D40. That's been covered here, but you missed it.
    > They'd tell you this at Colonial or Harmon.


    hopefully what they would tell you is actually correct.

    *all* af-s lenses (or equivalent if non-nikon) will autofocus. dx just
    means the lens won't cover a full frame sensor (not an issue on a d40).
    there are over 70 different lenses available, many of which can be
    found used. lenses that aren't af-s still work fine, they just require
    manual focusing.
     
    nospam, Dec 5, 2008
    #16
  17. tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 18:17:32 -0800, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, tony cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> >> While I own a D40, I think I'd steer this user to a Pentax because of
    >> >> lens capability. The daughter will find adding lenses to be cheaper
    >> >> in the long run.
    >> >
    >> >I doubt it. With Nikon there are tons of used lenses available.

    >>
    >> You see, you're here, you're reading, and you're not paying attention.
    >> The D40 lens choices are limited. Not all Nikon lenses work with the
    >> D40 as far as providing all functions. Only AS-S DX lenses are fully
    >> functional with a D40. That's been covered here, but you missed it.
    >> They'd tell you this at Colonial or Harmon.

    >
    >hopefully what they would tell you is actually correct.
    >
    >*all* af-s lenses (or equivalent if non-nikon) will autofocus. dx just
    >means the lens won't cover a full frame sensor (not an issue on a d40).
    >there are over 70 different lenses available, many of which can be
    >found used. lenses that aren't af-s still work fine, they just require
    >manual focusing.


    The term "fully functional" means all features function. The novice
    that purchases a D40 with the autofocus lenses expects any Nikon lens
    to autofocus if it fits his D40. That's not the case.




    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Dec 5, 2008
    #17
  18. nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> While I own a D40, I think I'd steer this user to a Pentax because of
    > >> >> lens capability. The daughter will find adding lenses to be cheaper
    > >> >> in the long run.
    > >> >
    > >> >I doubt it. With Nikon there are tons of used lenses available.
    > >>
    > >> You see, you're here, you're reading, and you're not paying attention.
    > >> The D40 lens choices are limited. Not all Nikon lenses work with the
    > >> D40 as far as providing all functions. Only AS-S DX lenses are fully
    > >> functional with a D40. That's been covered here, but you missed it.
    > >> They'd tell you this at Colonial or Harmon.

    > >
    > >hopefully what they would tell you is actually correct.
    > >
    > >*all* af-s lenses (or equivalent if non-nikon) will autofocus. dx just
    > >means the lens won't cover a full frame sensor (not an issue on a d40).
    > >there are over 70 different lenses available, many of which can be
    > >found used. lenses that aren't af-s still work fine, they just require
    > >manual focusing.

    >
    > The term "fully functional" means all features function. The novice
    > that purchases a D40 with the autofocus lenses expects any Nikon lens
    > to autofocus if it fits his D40. That's not the case.


    nobody said otherwise. my point is that you said only af-s dx lenses
    work. that's wrong. af-s lenses that are not dx are fully functional
    on a d40, including autofocus. examples include the 24-70 and the now
    discontinued 80-200 af-s which can *only* be found used.
     
    nospam, Dec 5, 2008
    #18
  19. tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 04 Dec 2008 19:29:49 -0800, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, tony cooper
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> >> >> While I own a D40, I think I'd steer this user to a Pentax because of
    >> >> >> lens capability. The daughter will find adding lenses to be cheaper
    >> >> >> in the long run.
    >> >> >
    >> >> >I doubt it. With Nikon there are tons of used lenses available.
    >> >>
    >> >> You see, you're here, you're reading, and you're not paying attention.
    >> >> The D40 lens choices are limited. Not all Nikon lenses work with the
    >> >> D40 as far as providing all functions. Only AS-S DX lenses are fully
    >> >> functional with a D40. That's been covered here, but you missed it.
    >> >> They'd tell you this at Colonial or Harmon.
    >> >
    >> >hopefully what they would tell you is actually correct.
    >> >
    >> >*all* af-s lenses (or equivalent if non-nikon) will autofocus. dx just
    >> >means the lens won't cover a full frame sensor (not an issue on a d40).
    >> >there are over 70 different lenses available, many of which can be
    >> >found used. lenses that aren't af-s still work fine, they just require
    >> >manual focusing.

    >>
    >> The term "fully functional" means all features function. The novice
    >> that purchases a D40 with the autofocus lenses expects any Nikon lens
    >> to autofocus if it fits his D40. That's not the case.

    >
    >nobody said otherwise. my point is that you said only af-s dx lenses
    >work. that's wrong. af-s lenses that are not dx are fully functional
    >on a d40, including autofocus. examples include the 24-70 and the now
    >discontinued 80-200 af-s which can *only* be found used.


    For Christ's sake...read what is posted before you reply: "Not all
    Nikon lenses work with the D40 as far as providing all functions.
    Only AF-S DX lenses are fully functional with a D40."

    I didn't say only AF-S lenses work with the D40. I didn't say there
    are no other Nikon lenses other than the DX lenses that can be used
    with the D40. I said "not all" and "providing all functions. You've
    circled around and said the same thing.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Dec 5, 2008
    #19
  20. nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > For Christ's sake...read what is posted before you reply: "Not all
    > Nikon lenses work with the D40 as far as providing all functions.
    > Only AF-S DX lenses are fully functional with a D40."


    i did read it.

    the *only* thing that's needed is a focus motor in the lens. dx has
    nothing to do with it. nikon calls it af-s, sigma calls it hsm, and i
    don't think tamron or tokina have a special designation. *any* lens
    that is af-s or equivalent will be fully functional on a d40, d40x or
    d60, namely autofocus.

    dx means the lens has a smaller image circle, suitable for crop sensor
    cameras. there are older full frame af-s lenses that are not dx which
    will provide all functions on a d40, namely autofocus. i gave two
    examples in the previous post.
     
    nospam, Dec 5, 2008
    #20
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