Browsers

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Kerodo, Nov 27, 2003.

  1. Kerodo

    Kerodo Guest

    Sponge -- What would you recommend as the most secure browser for
    Windows...
    Kerodo, Nov 27, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Kerodo

    [ Doc Jeff ] Guest

    On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 23:27:39 -0800, Kerodo <>
    wrote:

    >Sponge -- What would you recommend as the most secure browser for
    >Windows...


    Lynx. It's never been compromised on my boxen and I've tried...

    --
    http://www.cotse.net - Use it, you know you want to.
    If you're too scared to go look for yourself, ask me
    about COTSE. I'd be happy to tell you about it.
    [ Doc Jeff ], Nov 27, 2003
    #2
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  3. Kerodo

    sponge Guest

    On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 23:27:39 -0800, Kerodo <>
    wrote:

    >Sponge -- What would you recommend as the most secure browser for
    >Windows...


    Good question. It's a toss-up between Mozilla and Opera, Mozilla
    (Netscape), probably has the best track record in terms of serious
    vulnerabilities. Opera, on the other hand, has had a few serious
    vulnerabilities (all fixed now as of version 7.22, and nothing close
    to the vulnerabilities in IE), but has much better privacy and
    security-control features. This and it's raw speed and
    user-friendliness are why I use it 99% of the time.

    The only drawback to Opera is that, unless you buy it, it will display
    ads, and it does have a tracking GUID embedded in it that gets
    transmitted to the ad service, Advertising.com, if you click an ad.
    However, this feature is (very) easily controlled; you can either 1.
    block Advertising.com's servers in your firewall (I include all
    Advertising.com servers in my "Spyware Blocklist" and Kerio rulesets
    anyway); 2. you can block it with DNSKong, or 3. if you don't use
    either, you can simply block all the ad services by adding the lines
    to your HOSTS file located at the end of my post. You can easily
    change the GUID too, at least on Opera 6.
    There is one thing to point out: virtually all websites are designed
    to work with only two kinds of browsers. First there's Internet
    Explorer, and second there are Gecko browsers (Netscape, Mozilla,
    Firebird, Thunderbird, K-Meleon, etc.) I have never not been able to
    access a website in Mozilla -- and that's several hundred if not a
    thousand over the years -- except for four that were trying to install
    spyware. (One was an MP3 site, the other three were the homepages of
    spyware and browser-hijacker vendors, which is why they wanted you to
    use Internet Explorer.) The moral of the story is, if you can't access
    a website in Mozilla, it's a website you definitely don't want to be
    visiting anyway.
    I've had several websites, in additon to the four mentioned above,
    that wouldn't work with Opera. In almost all of the cases, the problem
    was cleared up once I set Opera to allow referrer logging. It will
    enabled it by default when you install Opera anyway, but since
    referrer logging raises severe abuse concerns, particularly when
    dealing with spam, I normally have it turned off. (There is also a
    hack that lets you do this on Mozilla too, but it involves shutting
    down the browser, manually editing the prefs.js file, and restarting
    the browser each time you want to enable or disable referrer logging.)
    If you're really, really privacy-conscious, using Opera's Delete
    Private Data... feature when closing out the browser will delete your
    cache, cookies, and other stuff. Personally, I only use this feature
    after accessing my webmail account, since there have been exploits
    that make use of webmail data, but a lot of people really love this
    feature and use it all the time.

    HOSTS file to be used with Opera:
    127.0.0.1 opera1-servedby.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 opera2-servedby.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 opera3-servedby.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 opera4-servedby.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 opera5-servedby.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 opera6-servedby.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 opera7-servedby.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 opera8-servedby.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 opera9-servedby.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 opera10-servedby.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 opera-report.advertising.com
    127.0.0.1 ins1.opera.com
    127.0.0.1 ins2.opera.com

    Sponge
    Sponge's Secure Solutions
    www.geocities.com/yosponge
    My new email: yosponge2 att yahoo dott com
    sponge, Nov 28, 2003
    #3
  4. "sponge" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 23:27:39 -0800, Kerodo <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Sponge -- What would you recommend as the most secure browser for
    > >Windows...

    >
    > Good question. It's a toss-up between Mozilla and Opera, Mozilla
    > (Netscape), probably has the best track record in terms of serious
    > vulnerabilities. Opera, on the other hand, has had a few serious
    > vulnerabilities (all fixed now as of version 7.22, and nothing close
    > to the vulnerabilities in IE), but has much better privacy and
    > security-control features. This and it's raw speed and
    > user-friendliness are why I use it 99% of the time.


    <snip excellent review>

    How's the speed these days? I trialled it a while back, but it was
    frighteningly slow.

    It also slowed the whole machine (turned the test 500MHz Celeron into a very
    good P60 emulator! It was measured as slightly slower than the 100MHz box I
    used to have, running IE 6). I trust that someone's paid a bit of attention
    to that aspect?

    Never had a problem displaying HTML with Opera, bar a few rendering and Java
    problems (there are a few apparent CSS-related problems in both 6 & 7, but
    the will-it/won't-it Java implementation was a bit of a pain).

    --

    Hairy One Kenobi

    Disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this opinion do not necessarily
    reflect the opinions of the highly-opinionated person expressing the opinion
    in the first place. So there!
    Hairy One Kenobi, Nov 28, 2003
    #4
  5. Kerodo

    sponge Guest

    On Fri, 28 Nov 2003 08:59:50 -0000, "Hairy One Kenobi"
    <abuse@[127.0.0.1]> wrote:

    >"sponge" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 23:27:39 -0800, Kerodo

    <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Sponge -- What would you recommend as the most secure browser for
    >> >Windows...

    >>
    >> Good question. It's a toss-up between Mozilla and Opera, Mozilla
    >> (Netscape), probably has the best track record in terms of serious
    >> vulnerabilities. Opera, on the other hand, has had a few serious
    >> vulnerabilities (all fixed now as of version 7.22, and nothing

    close
    >> to the vulnerabilities in IE), but has much better privacy and
    >> security-control features. This and it's raw speed and
    >> user-friendliness are why I use it 99% of the time.

    >
    ><snip excellent review>
    >
    >How's the speed these days? I trialled it a while back, but it was
    >frighteningly slow.
    >
    >It also slowed the whole machine (turned the test 500MHz Celeron into

    a very
    >good P60 emulator! It was measured as slightly slower than the 100MHz

    box I
    >used to have, running IE 6). I trust that someone's paid a bit of

    attention
    >to that aspect?


    Mozilla has improved A LOT! I remember those problems too, especially
    with Netscape 6/Mozilla 1.0. It still isn't as quick as Opera but,
    then again, nothing is.

    >Never had a problem displaying HTML with Opera, bar a few rendering

    and Java
    >problems (there are a few apparent CSS-related problems in both 6 &

    7, but
    >the will-it/won't-it Java implementation was a bit of a pain).


    That's about the same as I've experienced, plus I had a few pages that
    would get stuck in a form because you couldn't POST to advance. That's
    due to poorly-written JavaScript, but even though there's still some
    of that here and there, it seems like more and more web designers are
    getting their stuff straight, and Opera copes very well even with some
    pretty bad stuff.

    BTW, I should have also included rps1.opera.com and rps2.opera.com in
    the HOSTS file I mentioned in my last post.

    Sponge
    Sponge's Secure Solutions
    www.geocities.com/yosponge
    My new email: yosponge2 att yahoo dott com
    sponge, Nov 28, 2003
    #5
  6. Kerodo

    Kerodo Guest

    Thanks for all the input! I'm currently using both Firebird and
    Mozilla. I like both a lot. Firebird because I like testing and
    playing with new software, and Mozilla because I wanted something more
    stable for certain occasions. I'm very glad to hear you speak highly
    of Mozilla.

    I did try Opera the other day, but I don't like it much. Struck me as
    something that AOL would write. Too much junk and frills in it. But
    apparently a lot of people like it, so there you go...

    It's funny. You would think that Microsoft would try to fix up IE
    after all the criticisms and maybe ad tabs and a few other things that
    almost all of the current browsers have. But apparently they have no
    plans to even release an IE 7.0 at all.

    For now I'll stick with the Gecko browsers.

    Thanks for all your comments...

    On 27 Nov 2003 21:45:46 -0800, (sponge) wrote:

    >On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 23:27:39 -0800, Kerodo <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Sponge -- What would you recommend as the most secure browser for
    >>Windows...

    >
    >Good question. It's a toss-up between Mozilla and Opera, Mozilla
    >(Netscape), probably has the best track record in terms of serious
    >vulnerabilities. Opera, on the other hand, has had a few serious
    >vulnerabilities (all fixed now as of version 7.22, and nothing close
    >to the vulnerabilities in IE), but has much better privacy and
    >security-control features. This and it's raw speed and
    >user-friendliness are why I use it 99% of the time.
    >
    >The only drawback to Opera is that, unless you buy it, it will display
    >ads, and it does have a tracking GUID embedded in it that gets
    >transmitted to the ad service, Advertising.com, if you click an ad.
    >However, this feature is (very) easily controlled; you can either 1.
    >block Advertising.com's servers in your firewall (I include all
    >Advertising.com servers in my "Spyware Blocklist" and Kerio rulesets
    >anyway); 2. you can block it with DNSKong, or 3. if you don't use
    >either, you can simply block all the ad services by adding the lines
    >to your HOSTS file located at the end of my post. You can easily
    >change the GUID too, at least on Opera 6.
    >There is one thing to point out: virtually all websites are designed
    >to work with only two kinds of browsers. First there's Internet
    >Explorer, and second there are Gecko browsers (Netscape, Mozilla,
    >Firebird, Thunderbird, K-Meleon, etc.) I have never not been able to
    >access a website in Mozilla -- and that's several hundred if not a
    >thousand over the years -- except for four that were trying to install
    >spyware. (One was an MP3 site, the other three were the homepages of
    >spyware and browser-hijacker vendors, which is why they wanted you to
    >use Internet Explorer.) The moral of the story is, if you can't access
    >a website in Mozilla, it's a website you definitely don't want to be
    >visiting anyway.
    >I've had several websites, in additon to the four mentioned above,
    >that wouldn't work with Opera. In almost all of the cases, the problem
    >was cleared up once I set Opera to allow referrer logging. It will
    >enabled it by default when you install Opera anyway, but since
    >referrer logging raises severe abuse concerns, particularly when
    >dealing with spam, I normally have it turned off. (There is also a
    >hack that lets you do this on Mozilla too, but it involves shutting
    >down the browser, manually editing the prefs.js file, and restarting
    >the browser each time you want to enable or disable referrer logging.)
    >If you're really, really privacy-conscious, using Opera's Delete
    >Private Data... feature when closing out the browser will delete your
    >cache, cookies, and other stuff. Personally, I only use this feature
    >after accessing my webmail account, since there have been exploits
    >that make use of webmail data, but a lot of people really love this
    >feature and use it all the time.
    >
    >HOSTS file to be used with Opera:
    >127.0.0.1 opera1-servedby.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 opera2-servedby.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 opera3-servedby.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 opera4-servedby.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 opera5-servedby.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 opera6-servedby.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 opera7-servedby.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 opera8-servedby.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 opera9-servedby.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 opera10-servedby.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 opera-report.advertising.com
    >127.0.0.1 ins1.opera.com
    >127.0.0.1 ins2.opera.com
    >
    >Sponge
    >Sponge's Secure Solutions
    >www.geocities.com/yosponge
    >My new email: yosponge2 att yahoo dott com
    Kerodo, Nov 28, 2003
    #6
    1. Advertising

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