Broken light bulb - pic

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by DeanB, Mar 18, 2007.

  1. DeanB

    DeanB Guest

    http://i18.tinypic.com/48c0kgh.jpg

    This was taken on a Minolta 7000 with 50/1.4 and flash. Its a scan of
    the print, not a good scan either. The bulb was shot with a pellet
    gun, fixed up to trip the flash.
    DeanB, Mar 18, 2007
    #1
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  2. DeanB

    Justin C Guest

    On 2007-03-18, DeanB <> wrote:
    > http://i18.tinypic.com/48c0kgh.jpg
    >
    > This was taken on a Minolta 7000 with 50/1.4 and flash. Its a scan of
    > the print, not a good scan either. The bulb was shot with a pellet
    > gun, fixed up to trip the flash.


    .... and what about it?

    Justin.

    --
    Justin C, by the sea.
    Justin C, Mar 18, 2007
    #2
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  3. DeanB

    acl Guest

    On Mar 18, 7:10 am, "DeanB" <> wrote:
    > http://i18.tinypic.com/48c0kgh.jpg
    >
    > This was taken on a Minolta 7000 with 50/1.4 and flash. Its a scan of
    > the print, not a good scan either. The bulb was shot with a pellet
    > gun, fixed up to trip the flash.



    Excellent, thanks! Do you have any more similar shots?
    acl, Mar 18, 2007
    #3
  4. DeanB

    DeanB Guest

    On Mar 18, 1:21 pm, "acl" <> wrote:
    > On Mar 18, 7:10 am, "DeanB" <> wrote:
    >
    > >http://i18.tinypic.com/48c0kgh.jpg

    >
    > > This was taken on a Minolta 7000 with 50/1.4 and flash. Its a scan of
    > > the print, not a good scan either. The bulb was shot with a pellet
    > > gun, fixed up to trip the flash.

    >
    > Excellent, thanks! Do you have any more similar shots?


    Many thanks! I had one of a frosted bulb breaking in similar
    circumstances, but its not quite so good. I can't find it now anyway.

    Anyone know if some flashes are faster than others, and if so, which
    ones? I think low-energy flashes are shorter, but not sure.
    DeanB, Mar 18, 2007
    #4
  5. DeanB

    Pete D Guest

    I built an electronic flash activator years ago that was activated by sound
    so I could photograph balloons bursting, still have it, must dust it off and
    have a play.


    "DeanB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > http://i18.tinypic.com/48c0kgh.jpg
    >
    > This was taken on a Minolta 7000 with 50/1.4 and flash. Its a scan of
    > the print, not a good scan either. The bulb was shot with a pellet
    > gun, fixed up to trip the flash.
    >
    Pete D, Mar 19, 2007
    #5
  6. DeanB

    Richard H. Guest

    DeanB wrote:
    > Anyone know if some flashes are faster than others, and if so, which
    > ones? I think low-energy flashes are shorter, but not sure.


    Get a stronger flash and reduce it's power. It's designed to dump X
    amount of light in Y time period; the easiest way for them to reduce the
    output is to shorten the strobe's burst (not reduce its intensity).

    So, how did you trigger the flash, and how did you tune the timing of
    the trigger? A creation of your own, or a commercial product?

    Cheers,
    Richard
    Richard H., Mar 19, 2007
    #6
  7. DeanB

    DeanB Guest

    > So, how did you trigger the flash, and how did you tune the timing of
    > the trigger? A creation of your own, or a commercial product?


    I fixed a needle facing toward the bulb, and a tobacco tin lie about
    1/4" in front of the pin, and both were fitted to close a circuit on
    the flash contact on the bottom of the flash.

    When I shot the bulb, the pellet went through the bulb, and on into
    the tin lid, which then pushed onto the needle, setting off the
    flash.
    DeanB, Mar 19, 2007
    #7
  8. DeanB

    Richard H. Guest

    DeanB wrote:
    > I fixed a needle facing toward the bulb, and a tobacco tin lie about
    > 1/4" in front of the pin, and both were fitted to close a circuit on
    > the flash contact on the bottom of the flash.
    >
    > When I shot the bulb, the pellet went through the bulb, and on into
    > the tin lid, which then pushed onto the needle, setting off the
    > flash.


    Clever, and simple too!
    Richard H., Mar 19, 2007
    #8
  9. DeanB

    DeanB Guest

    On Mar 18, 7:48 pm, "Pete D" <> wrote:
    > I built an electronic flash activator years ago that was activated by sound
    > so I could photograph balloons bursting, still have it, must dust it off and
    > have a play.
    >
    > "DeanB" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > >http://i18.tinypic.com/48c0kgh.jpg

    >
    > > This was taken on a Minolta 7000 with 50/1.4 and flash. Its a scan of
    > > the print, not a good scan either. The bulb was shot with a pellet
    > > gun, fixed up to trip the flash.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Pete- can you give details on this? Is this a radio shack job or
    something you had to build yourself?
    DeanB, Mar 19, 2007
    #9
  10. DeanB

    Allen Guest

    DeanB wrote:
    > On Mar 18, 1:21 pm, "acl" <> wrote:
    >> On Mar 18, 7:10 am, "DeanB" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> http://i18.tinypic.com/48c0kgh.jpg
    >>> This was taken on a Minolta 7000 with 50/1.4 and flash. Its a scan of
    >>> the print, not a good scan either. The bulb was shot with a pellet
    >>> gun, fixed up to trip the flash.

    >> Excellent, thanks! Do you have any more similar shots?

    >
    > Many thanks! I had one of a frosted bulb breaking in similar
    > circumstances, but its not quite so good. I can't find it now anyway.
    >
    > Anyone know if some flashes are faster than others, and if so, which
    > ones? I think low-energy flashes are shorter, but not sure.
    >

    Remembering things I read when Harold Edgerton invented and was
    developing what was he called "stroboscopic photography", the duration
    of the flash is inversely proportional to the voltage applied to the
    tube. His famous pictures such as one showing a bullet halfway through a
    playing card were taken with equipment pouring tens of thousands of
    volts (30K comes to mind) through the tube. Not sure now, but I recall
    that his tubes were filled with xenon; I have no idea what is used now,
    but all his early attempts were in BW, and I don't know what color
    pictures would have looked like--perhaps monochrome. I remember pictures
    of some of his equipment with power supplies that would have probably
    required two strong people to lift. This is going back 60 years or so,
    and different gases in the tubes might produce different results.
    Allen
    Allen, Mar 19, 2007
    #10
  11. DeanB

    Karl Winkler Guest

    On Mar 19, 8:09 am, Allen <> wrote:
    > DeanB wrote:
    > > On Mar 18, 1:21 pm, "acl" <> wrote:
    > >> On Mar 18, 7:10 am, "DeanB" <> wrote:

    >
    > >>>http://i18.tinypic.com/48c0kgh.jpg
    > >>> This was taken on a Minolta 7000 with 50/1.4 and flash. Its a scan of
    > >>> the print, not a good scan either. The bulb was shot with a pellet
    > >>> gun, fixed up to trip the flash.
    > >> Excellent, thanks! Do you have any more similar shots?

    >
    > > Many thanks! I had one of a frosted bulb breaking in similar
    > > circumstances, but its not quite so good. I can't find it now anyway.

    >
    > > Anyone know if some flashes are faster than others, and if so, which
    > > ones? I think low-energy flashes are shorter, but not sure.

    >
    > Remembering things I read when Harold Edgerton invented and was
    > developing what was he called "stroboscopic photography", the duration
    > of the flash is inversely proportional to the voltage applied to the
    > tube. His famous pictures such as one showing a bullet halfway through a
    > playing card were taken with equipment pouring tens of thousands of
    > volts (30K comes to mind) through the tube. Not sure now, but I recall
    > that his tubes were filled with xenon; I have no idea what is used now,
    > but all his early attempts were in BW, and I don't know what color
    > pictures would have looked like--perhaps monochrome. I remember pictures
    > of some of his equipment with power supplies that would have probably
    > required two strong people to lift. This is going back 60 years or so,
    > and different gases in the tubes might produce different results.
    > Allen


    Edgerton did plenty of stuff in color as well, including the famous
    bullet hitting an apple:

    http://graphics.stanford.edu/~levoy/images/bullet-apple-s.jpg

    My understanding is that he also used sound to trigger his strobes,
    although I'm not sure exactly how he did it.

    Karl Winkler
    http://www.karlwinkler.com
    Karl Winkler, Mar 19, 2007
    #11
  12. DeanB

    DeanB Guest

    On Mar 19, 1:10 pm, "Karl Winkler" <> wrote:
    > On Mar 19, 8:09 am, Allen <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > DeanB wrote:
    > > > On Mar 18, 1:21 pm, "acl" <> wrote:
    > > >> On Mar 18, 7:10 am, "DeanB" <> wrote:

    >
    > > >>>http://i18.tinypic.com/48c0kgh.jpg
    > > >>> This was taken on a Minolta 7000 with 50/1.4 and flash. Its a scan of
    > > >>> the print, not a good scan either. The bulb was shot with a pellet
    > > >>> gun, fixed up to trip the flash.
    > > >> Excellent, thanks! Do you have any more similar shots?

    >
    > > > Many thanks! I had one of a frosted bulb breaking in similar
    > > > circumstances, but its not quite so good. I can't find it now anyway.

    >
    > > > Anyone know if some flashes are faster than others, and if so, which
    > > > ones? I think low-energy flashes are shorter, but not sure.

    >
    > > Remembering things I read when Harold Edgerton invented and was
    > > developing what was he called "stroboscopic photography", the duration
    > > of the flash is inversely proportional to the voltage applied to the
    > > tube. His famous pictures such as one showing a bullet halfway through a
    > > playing card were taken with equipment pouring tens of thousands of
    > > volts (30K comes to mind) through the tube. Not sure now, but I recall
    > > that his tubes were filled with xenon; I have no idea what is used now,
    > > but all his early attempts were in BW, and I don't know what color
    > > pictures would have looked like--perhaps monochrome. I remember pictures
    > > of some of his equipment with power supplies that would have probably
    > > required two strong people to lift. This is going back 60 years or so,
    > > and different gases in the tubes might produce different results.
    > > Allen

    >
    > Edgerton did plenty of stuff in color as well, including the famous
    > bullet hitting an apple:
    >
    > http://graphics.stanford.edu/~levoy/images/bullet-apple-s.jpg
    >
    > My understanding is that he also used sound to trigger his strobes,
    > although I'm not sure exactly how he did it.
    >
    > Karl Winklerhttp://www.karlwinkler.com- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Awesome pic that, I've seen it before.
    DeanB, Mar 19, 2007
    #12
  13. DeanB

    DeanB Guest

    Re: Exit wound! was Broken light bulb - pic

    On Mar 19, 5:22 pm, Rita Ä Berkowitz <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> wrote:
    > DeanB wrote:
    > > Pete- can you give details on this? Is this a radio shack job or
    > > something you had to build yourself?

    >
    > If you think you're good with a pellet gun, see if you can top this shot!
    > Now, that's an exit wound!
    >
    > http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2006/pressure.htm
    >
    > Rita


    Ok, so that's a glass-blower messing with a bulb! Its not a fast
    action shot!
    DeanB, Mar 19, 2007
    #13
  14. Exit wound! was Broken light bulb - pic

    DeanB wrote:

    > Pete- can you give details on this? Is this a radio shack job or
    > something you had to build yourself?


    If you think you're good with a pellet gun, see if you can top this shot!
    Now, that's an exit wound!

    http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2006/pressure.htm







    Rita
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=, Mar 19, 2007
    #14
  15. Re: Exit wound! was Broken light bulb - pic

    Rita Ä Berkowitz wrote:
    > DeanB wrote:
    >
    >> Pete- can you give details on this? Is this a radio shack job or
    >> something you had to build yourself?

    >
    > If you think you're good with a pellet gun, see if you can top this
    > shot! Now, that's an exit wound!
    >
    > http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2006/pressure.htm


    Ah, a decisive moment!
    David Dyer-Bennet, Mar 19, 2007
    #15
  16. "DeanB" <> writes:

    >Pete- can you give details on this? Is this a radio shack job or
    >something you had to build yourself?


    I built something like this years ago too. It followed the basic idea
    of plans that had been published in an electronics or photo magazine.
    I used an ordinary microphone, connected to a tape recorder used as a
    mike preamp (if you put many tape recorders in record pause mode, the
    microphone signal appears amplified on the line outputs for monitoring).
    The audio output from the tape recorder then went to a simple circuit
    with a diac (bidirectional Zener diode, basically) and an SCR.
    Sufficient voltage in the audio signal triggers the SCR, which is
    connected to trigger the flash through a standard PC flash cable.

    At that time, flash trigger voltages could be several hundred volts, so
    the SCR had to be rated to withstand that. These days, most flashes
    have low-voltage trigger circuits so that would not be necessary.

    Sensitivity is controlled by the mic gain on the tape recorder. Delay
    between impact and flash is adjusted by the distance between the bulb
    (or whatever the target is) and the microphone, at a rate of about 1
    millisecond per foot.

    You get short (action-stopping) flash pulses by using a fairly powerful
    flash and then operate it way below maximum output, either by setting it
    to "auto" exposure mode and placing it near the target, or by manually
    selecting fractional power output if it has manual power control.

    I didn't try shooting things with a gun, but it worked well for hitting
    light bulbs with a hammer and for splashing water.

    Dave
    Dave Martindale, Mar 21, 2007
    #16
  17. DeanB

    John Turco Guest

    Allen wrote:
    >
    > DeanB wrote:
    > > On Mar 18, 1:21 pm, "acl" <> wrote:
    > >> On Mar 18, 7:10 am, "DeanB" <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> http://i18.tinypic.com/48c0kgh.jpg
    > >>> This was taken on a Minolta 7000 with 50/1.4 and flash. Its a scan of
    > >>> the print, not a good scan either. The bulb was shot with a pellet
    > >>> gun, fixed up to trip the flash.
    > >> Excellent, thanks! Do you have any more similar shots?

    > >
    > > Many thanks! I had one of a frosted bulb breaking in similar
    > > circumstances, but its not quite so good. I can't find it now anyway.
    > >
    > > Anyone know if some flashes are faster than others, and if so, which
    > > ones? I think low-energy flashes are shorter, but not sure.
    > >

    > Remembering things I read when Harold Edgerton invented and was
    > developing what was he called "stroboscopic photography", the duration
    > of the flash is inversely proportional to the voltage applied to the
    > tube. His famous pictures such as one showing a bullet halfway through a
    > playing card were taken with equipment pouring tens of thousands of
    > volts (30K comes to mind) through the tube. Not sure now, but I recall
    > that his tubes were filled with xenon; I have no idea what is used now,
    > but all his early attempts were in BW, and I don't know what color
    > pictures would have looked like--perhaps monochrome. I remember pictures
    > of some of his equipment with power supplies that would have probably
    > required two strong people to lift. This is going back 60 years or so,
    > and different gases in the tubes might produce different results.
    > Allen



    Hello, Allen:

    Yes, indeed, Harold Edgerton was a brilliant Nebraskan, whether pun
    intended...or not. <g>

    On a more serious note, his powerful, airborne strobe units helped pave
    the way for the 1944 Allied invasion of Normandy, France, during World
    War II. They allowed aerial photographic reconnaissance of enemy
    positions, at night, while the Germans suspected nothing.


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
    John Turco, Mar 24, 2007
    #17
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