Broadband ?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Sam, Nov 2, 2004.

  1. Sam

    Sam Guest

    Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone line is
    any slower than on the main line?

    Thanks

    Sam
     
    Sam, Nov 2, 2004
    #1
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  2. Sam

    staple Guest

    "Sam" <> wrote in message
    news:cm8q69$lh0$...
    > Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone line is
    > any slower than on the main line?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Sam
    >
    >


    DSL is DSL, bandwidth depends on the physical distance to the switch or
    repeater.
     
    staple, Nov 2, 2004
    #2
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  3. Re: More 24hourfuckup.idiotdesk stupidity...

    In article <> kadbitcha <> wrote:
    >
    >David Hemingsley, <>, the brooding, wriggly
    >pervert, and street sweeper, ruptured:
    >
    >> yes it is

    >
    >BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAH!!!!!


    It is good to see you know your place.

    >Fucking pathetic. And the following post as well... The fucking OP just
    >wants to use a fucking extension line, you stupid cunts.


    Are you sure about that?

    --
    Lady Chatterly

    "Getting your ass kicked again I see. Lady C is quickly becomeing my
    hero." -- Crawdad
     
    Lady Chatterly, Nov 3, 2004
    #3
  4. yes it is
    "staple" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Sam" <> wrote in message
    > news:cm8q69$lh0$...
    >> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone line is
    >> any slower than on the main line?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >> Sam
    >>
    >>

    >
    > DSL is DSL, bandwidth depends on the physical distance to the switch or
    > repeater.
    >
     
    David Hemingsley, Nov 3, 2004
    #4
  5. Re: More 24hourfuckup.idiotdesk stupidity...

    "Fred" <~@~.com> wrote in message
    news:79a2494b5b274ae7b2ce9d8e26080047@fe.40usenetserver.com...
    > Lady Chatterly wrote:
    >
    > > It is good to see you know your place.

    >
    > I'm dangerous Dan McGrew.
    > > >On you knees frag!

    >
    > > Are you sure about that?

    >
    > None of your fucking business.
    > > >Wow wow wow! I'll assure you a burning ride
    > > >on Usenet!

    >
     
    Real Friendly Neighborhood Vote Ranger, Nov 3, 2004
    #5
  6. Sam

    Fred Guest

    Re: More 24hourfuckup.idiotdesk stupidity...

    Lady Chatterly wrote:

    > It is good to see you know your place.


    I'm dangerous Dan McGrew.

    > Are you sure about that?


    None of your fucking business.
     
    Fred, Nov 4, 2004
    #6
  7. Sam

    Robert Baer Guest

    > >> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone
    > >> line is any slower than on the main line?


    "Broadband" is the term used for *cable*; telephone lines use *DSL*.
    In either case, there is no speed difference, unless (for a phone
    line) there is a filter between the source (telco) and the DSL modem.
    If you insist on putting two or more DSL modems on one phone line, you
    should ger eXplicit instructuions concerning extra hardware.
     
    Robert Baer, Nov 4, 2004
    #7
  8. In article <> kadbitcha <> wrote:
    >
    >Robert Baer, <>, the self-righteous, stilted
    >headache, and tapster in the ale house, objected:
    >
    >>>>> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone
    >>>>> line is any slower than on the main line?

    >>
    >> "Broadband" is the term used for *cable*; telephone lines use *DSL*.

    >
    >BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!


    Anyone with any good sites for research and help.

    --
    Lady Chatterly

    "This isn't being generated by a human is it?" -- Meat-->Plow
     
    Lady Chatterly, Nov 4, 2004
    #8
  9. Sam

    G. Morgan Guest

    On 4 Nov 2004 09:20:47 GMT "Chloroflexus Aemulus Gambiensis"
    used 15 lines of text to write in newsgroup: 24hoursupport.helpdesk

    >Oh your what?


    Shouldn't you be pointing a bone and singing at someone? BWAHAHAHAHA


    --
    -Graham

    Remove the 'snails' from my email
     
    G. Morgan, Nov 4, 2004
    #9
  10. G. Morgan wrote:
    > On 4 Nov 2004 09:20:47 GMT "Chloroflexus Aemulus Gambiensis"
    > used 15 lines of text to write in newsgroup: 24hoursupport.helpdesk
    >
    >> Oh your what?

    >
    > Shouldn't you be pointing a bone and singing at someone? BWAHAHAHAHA


    Pick a bone...

    A transmission facility having a bandwidth sufficient to carry multiple
    voice, video or data channels simultaneously. Each channel occupies (is
    modulated to) a different frequency bandwidth on the transmission medium and
    is demodulated to its original frequency at the receiving end. Channels are
    separated by ìguardbandsî (empty spaces) to ensure that each channel wonít
    interfere with its neighboring channels.
    www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


    A transmission facility having a bandwidth sufficient to carry multiple
    voice, video or data channels simultaneously. Each channel occupies (is
    modulated to) a different frequency bandwidth on the transmission medium and
    is demodulated to its original frequency at the receiving end. Channels are
    separated by "guardbands" (empty spaces) to ensure that each channel will
    not interfere with its neighboring channels. This technique is used to
    provide many CATV channels on one coaxial cable. 10Broad36 is the only
    broadband Ethernet media type. All other Ethernet media types are
    "baseband".
    www.femf.org/education/Summit2000syll/ottglossary.htm


    A transmission medium capable of supporting a wide range of frequencies;
    can carry multiple signals by dividing the total capacity of the medium into
    multiple, independent bandwidth channels, where each channel operates only
    on a specific range of frequencies; used originally to describe a channel
    with more bandwidth than a standard 48 KHz voice grade channel.
    www.arraycomm.com/glossary.html


    A transmission facility having a bandwidth sufficient to carry multiple
    voice, video or data channels simultaneously. Each channel occupies (is
    modulated to) a different frequency bandwidth on the transmission medium and
    is demodulated to its original frequency at the receiving end. Channels are
    separated by "guardbands" (empty spaces) to ensure that each channel will
    not interfere with its neighboring channels.
    www.techfest.com/networking/cabling/cableglos.htm


    High-capacity high-speed, transmission channel carried on coaxial or
    fiber-optic cables with a wider bandwidth than conventional copper telephone
    lines. Broadband channels can carry video, voice, and data simultaneously.
    www.c-b.com/industryinfo/glossaries/telecom.asp


    The provision of multiple channels of information, over a single link
    which supports high speed through-put of data, typically using some form of
    frequency or wave-division multiplexing. The information could consist of
    voice, video or computer data See Also: DSL, Mbps Go to top
    www.easynet.com/investorinfo/investorinfo_glossary.asp


    A type of transmission that shares the bandwidth of a medium--such as
    copper or fiber optic cable--to carry more than one signal. Broadband
    facilities have a bandwidth (capacity) greater than a voice grade line of 3
    kHz. Such a broadband facility--typically coaxial cable--may carry numerous
    voice, video and data channels simultaneously. Each "channel" will take up a
    different frequency on the cable. "Guardbands" (empty spaces) exist between
    the channels to make sure that each channel does not interfere with its
    neighbor.
    www.intersil.com/design/commlink/glossary/index.asp


    A communication network in which the bandwidth can be divided and shared
    by multiple simultaneous signals (voice, data, video). The network can carry
    multiple signals by dividing the total capacity of the medium into multiple,
    independent bandwidth channels, where each channel operates only on a
    specific range of frequencies.
    www.bcdforum.org/public/library/glossary.html


    A transmission method in which the networks range of transmission
    frequencies is divided into separate channels and each channel is used to
    send a different signal. Broadband is often used to send different types of
    signals simultaneously.
    www.ircbeginner.com/opvinfo/webglossary.html


    A data transmission technique allowing multiple high-speed signals to
    share the bandwidth of a single cable via frequency division multiplexing.
    www.lantronix.com/learning/glossary/


    A transmission method that uses a bandwidth greater than a voice-grade
    channel's, and potentially capable of much higher transmission rates; also
    called wideband. In broadcast transmission, multiple channels access a
    medium (usually coaxial cable) that has a large bandwidth, using
    radio-frequency modems. Each channel occupies (is modulated to) a different
    frequency slot on the cable, and is demodulated to its original frequency at
    the receiving end.
    www.cxtec.com/corp/technical/net_gloss1.html


    (1) Transmission facility having a bandwidth greater than 20kHz; capable
    of high-speed data transmission. (2) Analog transmission technique used with
    data and video transmissions that provides multiple channels for users
    through frequency division multiplexing.
    www.daleen.com/company/glossary.htm


    Also referred to as wideband. A term describing any network that
    multiplexes multiple, independent network carrier frequencies on to a single
    cable. It allows multiple simultaneous "conversations", since the
    independent networks operate on different frequencies and do not interfere
    with each other. In LAN terminology, it refers to a system in which multiple
    channels access a medium, for example co-axial cable, that has a large
    bandwidth using Radio Frequency (RF) modems. This may allow the co-axial
    cable to carry multiple separate LANs whose transmission is being modulated
    at different frequencies.
    www.accsystems.com/glossary.htm


    This transmission medium allows transmission of voice, data, and video
    simultaneously at rates of 1.544Mbps or higher. Broadband transmission media
    generally can carry multiple channels - each at a different frequency or
    specific time slot. BPS (Bits-Per-Second) A measurement of how fast data is
    moved from one place to another. A 28.8 modem can move 28,800 bits per
    second.
    www.zoom.com/dsl/glossary1.html


    A term used to compare frequency bandwidth relative to 3 MHz narrowband
    frequencies. Broadband frequencies can transmit more data and at a higher
    speed than narrowband frequencies. In general, typical paging services
    utilise narrowband frequencies. Wireless phones and communication devices
    use broadband. Back to the top.
    www.telestial.com/glossary.htm


    Communication channels that are capable of carrying a wide range of
    frequencies. Broadcast television, cable television, microwave, and
    satellite are examples of broadband technologies. These technologies are
    capable of carrying a great deal of information in a short amount of time,
    but are more expensive to use than technologies like the telephone, which
    require less bandwidth. (Novak)
    citl.tamu.edu/citl-glossary-main.htm


    1. A type of communications channel capable of carrying a large portion of
    the electromagnetic spectrum. A broadband channel can accommodate the
    following media: audio, digital, and television. 2. A transmission facility
    having a bandwidth greater than 20 kHz capable of high speed data
    transmission. 3. An analog transmission technique used with data and video
    transmissions that provides multiple user channels through
    frequency-division multiplexing (FDM). See FDM.
    www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/voice/evbugl4.htm


    1. Transmission system that multiplexes multiple independent signals onto
    one cable. 2. Telecommunications terminology: Any channel having a bandwidth
    greater than a voice-grade channel (4 kHz). 3. LAN terminology: A coaxial
    cable on which analog signaling is used. Also called wideband.
    www.zworld.com/documentation/glossary/intro.html


    A transmission medium or channel that has a wider bandwidth than one voice
    channel (with a carrier wave of a certain modulated frequency). It allows
    multiple services like voice, data, video, etc. to transit over the network.
    support.airmail.net/faq/dslglossary.php


    A general term for different types of high-speed, high-bandwidth
    connections to the Internet, including DSL and cable. Back to Top
    support.sbcglobal.net/general/662.shtml


    High-speed transmission. The term is used to define the speed of
    communication lines or services and most commonly refers to T1 (1.544
    Mbit/s) rates or better, even though the actual rate may be much lower or
    higher, depending on the application.
    www.axis.com/corporate/corp/glossary_general.htm


    A transmission medium that can transmit large volumes of data in many
    frequencies. Use of broadband makes it possible to send quickly large data
    objects (such as movies, music, and games) using communication lines such as
    ADSL or CATV. It is usually charged at a flat rate and constant Internet
    access is possible.
    xml.fujitsu.com/en/terms/


    A service or system requiring transmission channels capable of supporting
    rates greater than the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) primary
    rate.
    www.marconi.com/html/glossary/glossaryb.htm


    A transmission medium capable of supporting a wide range of frequencies.
    It can carry multiple signals by dividing the total capacity of the medium
    into multiple, independent bandwidth channels, where each channel operates
    only on a specific range of frequencies. See also: baseband. [Source:
    RFC1392]
    www.jnug.ac.uk/netglossary.html


    Denotes transmission facilities capable of handling frequencies required
    for high-grade communications. Broadband infers the use of carrier signals
    as opposed to direct modulation. Characteristically used for simultaneous
    multi-channel transmission.
    www.networkcables.com/b.htm


    of or relating to or being a communications network in which the bandwidth
    can be divided and shared by multiple simultaneous signals (as for voice or
    data or video)
    www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


    responding to or operating at a wide band of frequencies; "a broadband
    antenna"
    www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn
     
    Pterynotus Quinii Triatominarum Sequivirus, Nov 4, 2004
    #10
  11. Sam

    G. Morgan Guest

    On 4 Nov 2004 09:28:03 GMT "Pterynotus Quinii Triatominarum
    Sequivirus"
    used 222 lines of text to write in newsgroup: 24hoursupport.helpdesk

    >Pick a bone...


    Point a Bone and sing:

    rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
    www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn

    the porous calcified substance from which bones are made
    www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn

    a shade of white the color of bleached bones
    www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn

    study intensively, as before an exam; "I had to bone up on my
    Latin verbs before the final exam"
    www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn

    remove the bones from; "bone the turkey before roasting it"
    www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn

    consisting of or made up of bone; "a bony substance"; "the bony
    framework of the body"
    www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn

    living tissue that makes up the body's skeleton.
    www.viahealth.org/disease/bone_disorders/glossary.htm

    Dense tissue that forms the skeleton. Bone can be donated and
    transplanted.
    www.organdonor.gov/glossary.html

    A connective tissue that contains a hardened matrix of mineral
    salts and collagen fibers. Its cells include osteocytes, which are
    embedded within lacunae, and the free-roaming osteoblasts and
    osteoclasts.
    www.sci.sdsu.edu/histology/gloss_a.htm

    derived from naturally deceased animals. Bone is usually given a
    surface texture, most commonly in the forms of pickbone and jigged
    bone. Bone can be dyed to achieve bright colors (e.g. green, blue, and
    black). This is the most common handle material for pocketknives.
    www.knifecenter.com/knifecenter/xtra/glossary.html

    hard substance that makes the skeletal system.
    healthandfitness.com/glossary.html

    The hard tissue that provides structural support tothe body, It is
    primarily composed of hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen. Individual
    bones may be classed aslong, short, or flat.
    www.sonoranspine.com/glossary.htm

    Hard, dense, specialized form of connective tissue that forms the
    skeleton. In addition to providing shape and structure to the body,
    bone stores mineral salts and aids information of blood cells under an
    outer "periosteum" layer, compact bone, a hard mass made up of layers
    of bone cell (osteocyte) tissue in concentric layers (Haversian
    system), forms the outer shell of most bones, surrounding inner spongy
    bone with its network of bony bars, and nerves. Bones are classified
    as long (e.g. femur), short (e.g. those in the wrist), flat (e.g.
    skull bones), or irregular (e.g. spinal column bones). There are 206
    bones in the human body.
    www.schmerz-online.de/public/go/go0964.htm

    — The hard, calcified tissue of the skeleton of vertebrate
    animals.
    www.stjohn.org/InnerPage.aspx

    The hard tissue that provides structural support to the body, It
    is primarily composed of hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen.
    Individual bones may be classed as long, short, or flat.
    spinaldoc.com/glossary.html

    The size and density of the skeletal frame of the dog. The
    Malamute must be a heavy-boned dog.
    www.minnesotamalamuteclub.com/glossary.htm

    Animal bones can tell us much about a site: The occupants' diet
    The species of the animals The sex of the animals The numbers of
    animals involved How the animals were exploited How the animals
    interacted with man: domesticated, farmed, parasites They show
    butchery marks and give evidence about the nature of the meat eaten
    and how it was butchered How the meat was prepared and cooked Age of
    the animals at slaughter indicates whether they were kept for
    breeding, for milk or for meat The cortex of animal bones is thicker
    than that of humans, and is therefore preserved better than man's See
    Articulated skeleton, Disarticulated skeleton, Phosphate analysis
    www.halifax-today.co.uk/specialfeatures/triviatrail/a22_b.html

    The hard tissue that provides structural support to the body. It
    is primarily composed of hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen.
    Individual bones may be classed as long, short, or flat.
    dr.briansiegel.com/gloss-b.html

    To remove the bones from meat, fish or fowl. Use a sharp boning
    knife and angle the blade toward the bone to avoid tearing or nicking
    the flesh.
    www.dmdforum.org/relaxation/kitchen/glossary.html

    This refers to the measurement around the leg of a horse, just
    below the knee or hock. It is purpose is to determine the horse's
    ability (or capacity) to carry weight.
    www.equineportal.com/glossary/b.html

    Cut meat away from the bones.
    glencoe.com/sec/busadmin/marketing/dp/food_mktg/gloss.shtml

    Alternate name for a domino or tile due to the fact that the
    original pieces were often made from animal bone.
    www.5x5.net/en/dominoes/glossary.html

    To remove all meat from the bone before cooking. Braise To cook
    food slowly in a small amount of liquid, in a tightly covered pan.
    Food is cooked slowly by first sauteeing in hot fat and then simmering
    in a small bit of liquid.
    www.spike-jamie.com/library/terms.html

    A hard bone or wood used to rub off pencil or charcoal design to
    fabric for samples, or for enlargements."
    www.cactuspunch.com/flash/support/glossary/defin-b.html

    A hard type of connective tissue that contains collagen fibers,
    calcium phosphate, and hydroxyapatite.

    cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/dental/chapter5/custom1/deluxe-content.html

    refers to a gray brown rather porous variety of the mineral
    smithsonite (ZnCO3) it is synonymous with drybone.
    www.uncwil.edu/earsci/Dubuque/glossary/glossary.htm

    n. tulang
    www.info-indo.com/language/engindo.htm

    Hard material which makes up the skeleton

    www.lgfl.net/dbmaterial/web/learnin...nce Moving and Growing The skeleton/glossary/

    To extend one of your legs while doing a grab.
    ww2.kraan.net/manuals/wakeboarden/tricks/glossary.phtml

    n. the hard material in the body
    www.ingraphik.com/tti/articles/dictionary.asp

    > gu

    www.ypexpat.com/en/html/se/se_td_md_result.asp


    --
    -Graham

    Remove the 'snails' from my email
     
    G. Morgan, Nov 4, 2004
    #11
  12. G. Morgan wrote:
    > On 4 Nov 2004 09:28:03 GMT "Pterynotus Quinii Triatominarum
    > Sequivirus"
    > used 222 lines of text to write in newsgroup: 24hoursupport.helpdesk
    >
    >> Pick a bone...

    >
    > Point a Bone and sing:
    >
    > rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
    > www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


    Graham see, Graham do.
     
    Leifia Americana Acephala, Nov 4, 2004
    #12
  13. Sam

    Conor Guest

    In article <>, Robert Baer says...
    > > >> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone
    > > >> line is any slower than on the main line?

    >
    > "Broadband" is the term used for *cable*; telephone lines use *DSL*.


    ROFLMAO.


    --
    Conor

    Opinions personal, facts suspect.
     
    Conor, Nov 4, 2004
    #13
  14. "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >> >> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone
    >> >> line is any slower than on the main line?

    >
    > "Broadband" is the term used for *cable*;


    Actually, "broadband" is a term that is used for BOTH Cable and DSL. It is
    in contrast to "baseband" transmission.

    And, regarding speed... I think most people who have had both would attest
    that Cable is typically faster and more reliable.
     
    Armchair Einstein, Nov 4, 2004
    #14
  15. Sam

    Conor Guest

    In article <>, Armchair Einstein
    says...
    >
    > "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >> >> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone
    > >> >> line is any slower than on the main line?

    > >
    > > "Broadband" is the term used for *cable*;

    >
    > Actually, "broadband" is a term that is used for BOTH Cable and DSL. It is
    > in contrast to "baseband" transmission.
    >

    ROFLMAO...

    You mean NARROWBAND asshole.

    > And, regarding speed... I think most people who have had both would attest
    > that Cable is typically faster and more reliable.
    >

    Fool.


    --
    Conor

    Opinions personal, facts suspect.
     
    Conor, Nov 5, 2004
    #15
  16. Sam

    Fred Guest

    Lady Chatterly <> wrote:

    > Anyone with any good sites for research and help.


    I'd like to help, but I won't.
     
    Fred, Nov 5, 2004
    #16
  17. Armchair Einstein <armchair_einstein@invalid_domain_of_pain.com> harried:

    > "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>>>> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone
    >>>>> line is any slower than on the main line?

    >>
    >> "Broadband" is the term used for *cable*;

    >
    > Actually, "broadband" is a term that is used for BOTH Cable and DSL.
    > It is in contrast to "baseband" transmission.


    BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAAHA!!!
     
    Brucelleae Thermoacetophila Nebulosa, Nov 5, 2004
    #17
  18. "Conor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>, Armchair Einstein
    > says...
    >>
    >> "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> >> >> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone
    >> >> >> line is any slower than on the main line?
    >> >
    >> > "Broadband" is the term used for *cable*;

    >>
    >> Actually, "broadband" is a term that is used for BOTH Cable and DSL. It
    >> is
    >> in contrast to "baseband" transmission.
    >>

    > ROFLMAO...
    >
    > You mean NARROWBAND asshole.


    Sir, that shows how much you know. Have you ever heard of 10Base-T ethernet?
    What about 100Base-T? The 10 or 100 in that term refers to 10 or 100 Mb/s,
    respectively, the "Base" refers to "Baseband transmission," and the "T"
    refers to "Twisted pair" cabling.

    >
    >> And, regarding speed... I think most people who have had both would
    >> attest
    >> that Cable is typically faster and more reliable.
    >>

    > Fool.
    >


    Yes, you are ;)
     
    Armchair Einstein, Nov 5, 2004
    #18
  19. Sam

    Linøslut Guest

    Armchair Einstein wrote:
    > "Conor" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> Fool.
    >>

    >
    > Yes, you are ;)


    Anytime you need a good laugh, look up Conor's posts in Google Groups.
     
    Linøslut, Nov 5, 2004
    #19
  20. Sam

    ric Guest

    Armchair Einstein wrote:

    > "Conor" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > In article <>, Armchair Einstein
    > > says...
    > >>
    > >> "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> >> >> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone
    > >> >> >> line is any slower than on the main line?
    > >> >
    > >> > "Broadband" is the term used for *cable*;
    > >>
    > >> Actually, "broadband" is a term that is used for BOTH Cable and DSL. It
    > >> is
    > >> in contrast to "baseband" transmission.
    > >>

    > > ROFLMAO...
    > >
    > > You mean NARROWBAND asshole.

    >
    > Sir, that shows how much you know. Have you ever heard of 10Base-T ethernet?
    > What about 100Base-T? The 10 or 100 in that term refers to 10 or 100 Mb/s,
    > respectively, the "Base" refers to "Baseband transmission," and the "T"
    > refers to "Twisted pair" cabling.


    Please, don't confuse Conor with facts. His limey brain will implode.
     
    ric, Nov 5, 2004
    #20
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    =?Utf-8?B?QWRyaWFuIEg=?=, Dec 6, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    4,929
    John Butler
    Dec 9, 2004
  5. Bill
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    738
    Nobody
    May 28, 2008
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