British ID cards

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by beenthere, Apr 26, 2006.

  1. beenthere

    beenthere Guest

    Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006

    Subject: ID cards are no joke

    PLEASE PASS THIS ON:

    You may have heard that legislation creating compulsory ID Cards
    passed a crucial stage in the House of Commons. You may feel that ID
    cards are not something to worry about, since we already have Photo ID
    for our Passport and Driving License and an ID Card will be no
    different to that. What you have not been told is the full scope of
    this proposed ID Card, and what it will mean to you personally.

    The proposed ID Card will be different from any card you now hold. It
    will be connected to a database called the NIR (or National Identity
    Register), where all of your personal details will be stored. This
    will include the unique number that will be issued to you, your
    fingerprints, a scan of the back of your eye, and your photograph. Your
    name, address and date of birth will also obviously be stored there.

    There will be spaces on this database for your religion, residence
    status, and many other private and personal facts about you. There is
    unlimited space for every other details of your life on the NIR
    database, which can be expanded by the Government with or without
    further Acts of Parliament.

    By itself, you might think that this register is harmless, but you
    would be wrong to come to this conclusion. This new card will be used
    to check your identity against your entry in the register in real time,
    whenever you present it to 'prove who you are'.

    Every place that sells alcohol or cigarettes, every post office, every
    pharmacy, and every Bank will have an NIR Card Terminal, (very much
    like the Chip and Pin Readers that are everywhere now) into which your
    card can be 'swiped' to check your identity. Each time this happens, a
    record is made at the NIR of the time and place that the Card was
    presented. This means for example, that there will be a government
    record of every time you withdraw more than £99 at your branch of
    NatWest, who now demand ID for these transactions. Every time you have
    to prove that you are over 18, your card will be swiped, and a record
    made at the NIR. Restaurants and off licenses will demand that your
    card is swiped so that each receipt shows that they sold alcohol to
    someone over 18, and that this was proved by the access to the NIR,
    indemnifying them from prosecution.

    Private businesses are going to be given access to the NIR Database.
    If you want to apply for a job, you will have to present your card for
    a swipe. If you want to apply for a London Underground Oyster Card, or
    a supermarket loyalty card, or a driving license you will have to
    present your ID Card for a swipe. The same goes for getting a
    telephone line or a mobile phone or an internet account.

    Oyster, DVLA, BT and Nectar (for example) all run very detailed
    databases of their own. They will be allowed access to the NIR, just
    as every other business will be. This means that each of these
    entities will be able to store your unique number in their database,
    and place all your travel, phone records, driving activities and
    detailed shopping habits under your unique NIR number. These databases,
    which can easily fit on a storage device the size of your hand, will be
    sold to third parties either legally or illegally. It will then be
    possible for a non-governmental entity to create a detailed dossier of
    all your activities. Certainly, the government will have clandestine
    access to all of them, meaning that they will have a complete record of
    all your movements, from how much and when you withdraw from your bank
    account to what medications you are taking, down to the level of what
    sort of bread you eat - all accessible via a single unique number in a
    Central database.

    This is quite a significant leap from a simple ID Card that shows
    simply
    your
    name and face.

    Most people do not know that this is the true character and scope of
    the proposed ID Card. Whenever the details of how it will work are
    explained to them, they quickly change from being ambivalent towards
    it.

    The Government is going to COMPEL you to enter your details into the
    NIR and to carry this card. If you and your children want to obtain or
    renew your passports, you will be forced to have your fingerprints
    taken and your eyes scanned for the NIR, and an ID Card will be issued
    to you whether you want one or not. If you refuse to be fingerprinted
    and eye scanned, you will not be able to get a passport. Your ID Card
    will, just like your passport, not be your property. The Home
    Secretary will have the right to revoke or suspend your ID at any time,
    meaning that you will not be able to withdraw money from your Bank
    Account, for example, or do anything that requires you to present your
    government issued ID Card.

    The arguments that have been put forwarded in favour of ID Cards can be
    easily disproved. ID Cards WILL NOT stop terrorists; every Spaniard
    has a compulsory ID Card as did the Madrid Bombers. ID Cards will not
    'eliminate benefit fraud', which in comparison, is small compared to
    the astronomical cost of this proposal, which will be measured in
    billions according to the LSE (London School of Economics). This scheme
    exists solely to exert total surveillance and control over the ordinary
    free British Citizen, and it will line the pockets of the companies
    that will create the computer systems at the expense of your freedom,
    privacy and money.

    If you did not know the full scope of the proposed ID Card Scheme
    before and you are as unsettled as I am at what it really means to you,
    to this country and its way of life, I urge you to email or photocopy
    this and give it to your friends and colleagues and everyone else you
    think should know and who cares. The Bill has proceeded to this stage
    due to the lack of accurate and complete information on this proposal
    being made public.

    Frances Stonor Saunders.

    Frances Stonor Saunders is the former arts editor of The New Statesman,
    author of The Cultural Cold War, Diabolical Englishman and The Devil's
    Broker, and was awarded the Royal Historical Society's William
    Gladstone
    Memorial Prize. She lives in London.
     
    beenthere, Apr 26, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. beenthere

    D@Z Guest

    so wot?

    "beenthere" <> wrote in message
    news:6uK3g.2$...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >
    > Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >
    > PLEASE PASS THIS ON:
    >
    > You may have heard that legislation creating compulsory ID Cards
    > passed a crucial stage in the House of Commons. You may feel that ID
    > cards are not something to worry about, since we already have Photo ID
    > for our Passport and Driving License and an ID Card will be no
    > different to that. What you have not been told is the full scope of
    > this proposed ID Card, and what it will mean to you personally.
    >
    > The proposed ID Card will be different from any card you now hold. It
    > will be connected to a database called the NIR (or National Identity
    > Register), where all of your personal details will be stored. This
    > will include the unique number that will be issued to you, your
    > fingerprints, a scan of the back of your eye, and your photograph. Your
    > name, address and date of birth will also obviously be stored there.
    >
    > There will be spaces on this database for your religion, residence
    > status, and many other private and personal facts about you. There is
    > unlimited space for every other details of your life on the NIR
    > database, which can be expanded by the Government with or without
    > further Acts of Parliament.
    >
    > By itself, you might think that this register is harmless, but you
    > would be wrong to come to this conclusion. This new card will be used
    > to check your identity against your entry in the register in real time,
    > whenever you present it to 'prove who you are'.
    >
    > Every place that sells alcohol or cigarettes, every post office, every
    > pharmacy, and every Bank will have an NIR Card Terminal, (very much
    > like the Chip and Pin Readers that are everywhere now) into which your
    > card can be 'swiped' to check your identity. Each time this happens, a
    > record is made at the NIR of the time and place that the Card was
    > presented. This means for example, that there will be a government
    > record of every time you withdraw more than £99 at your branch of
    > NatWest, who now demand ID for these transactions. Every time you have
    > to prove that you are over 18, your card will be swiped, and a record
    > made at the NIR. Restaurants and off licenses will demand that your
    > card is swiped so that each receipt shows that they sold alcohol to
    > someone over 18, and that this was proved by the access to the NIR,
    > indemnifying them from prosecution.
    >
    > Private businesses are going to be given access to the NIR Database.
    > If you want to apply for a job, you will have to present your card for
    > a swipe. If you want to apply for a London Underground Oyster Card, or
    > a supermarket loyalty card, or a driving license you will have to
    > present your ID Card for a swipe. The same goes for getting a
    > telephone line or a mobile phone or an internet account.
    >
    > Oyster, DVLA, BT and Nectar (for example) all run very detailed
    > databases of their own. They will be allowed access to the NIR, just
    > as every other business will be. This means that each of these
    > entities will be able to store your unique number in their database,
    > and place all your travel, phone records, driving activities and
    > detailed shopping habits under your unique NIR number. These databases,
    > which can easily fit on a storage device the size of your hand, will be
    > sold to third parties either legally or illegally. It will then be
    > possible for a non-governmental entity to create a detailed dossier of
    > all your activities. Certainly, the government will have clandestine
    > access to all of them, meaning that they will have a complete record of
    > all your movements, from how much and when you withdraw from your bank
    > account to what medications you are taking, down to the level of what
    > sort of bread you eat - all accessible via a single unique number in a
    > Central database.
    >
    > This is quite a significant leap from a simple ID Card that shows
    > simply
    > your
    > name and face.
    >
    > Most people do not know that this is the true character and scope of
    > the proposed ID Card. Whenever the details of how it will work are
    > explained to them, they quickly change from being ambivalent towards
    > it.
    >
    > The Government is going to COMPEL you to enter your details into the
    > NIR and to carry this card. If you and your children want to obtain or
    > renew your passports, you will be forced to have your fingerprints
    > taken and your eyes scanned for the NIR, and an ID Card will be issued
    > to you whether you want one or not. If you refuse to be fingerprinted
    > and eye scanned, you will not be able to get a passport. Your ID Card
    > will, just like your passport, not be your property. The Home
    > Secretary will have the right to revoke or suspend your ID at any time,
    > meaning that you will not be able to withdraw money from your Bank
    > Account, for example, or do anything that requires you to present your
    > government issued ID Card.
    >
    > The arguments that have been put forwarded in favour of ID Cards can be
    > easily disproved. ID Cards WILL NOT stop terrorists; every Spaniard
    > has a compulsory ID Card as did the Madrid Bombers. ID Cards will not
    > 'eliminate benefit fraud', which in comparison, is small compared to
    > the astronomical cost of this proposal, which will be measured in
    > billions according to the LSE (London School of Economics). This scheme
    > exists solely to exert total surveillance and control over the ordinary
    > free British Citizen, and it will line the pockets of the companies
    > that will create the computer systems at the expense of your freedom,
    > privacy and money.
    >
    > If you did not know the full scope of the proposed ID Card Scheme
    > before and you are as unsettled as I am at what it really means to you,
    > to this country and its way of life, I urge you to email or photocopy
    > this and give it to your friends and colleagues and everyone else you
    > think should know and who cares. The Bill has proceeded to this stage
    > due to the lack of accurate and complete information on this proposal
    > being made public.
    >
    > Frances Stonor Saunders.
    >
    > Frances Stonor Saunders is the former arts editor of The New Statesman,
    > author of The Cultural Cold War, Diabolical Englishman and The Devil's
    > Broker, and was awarded the Royal Historical Society's William
    > Gladstone
    > Memorial Prize. She lives in London.
    >
    >
     
    D@Z, Apr 26, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. beenthere

    antwine Guest

    Wish they would do that here!
    "beenthere" <> wrote in message
    news:6uK3g.2$...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >
    > Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >
    > PLEASE PASS THIS ON:
    >
    > You may have heard that legislation creating compulsory ID Cards
    > passed a crucial stage in the House of Commons. You may feel that ID
    > cards are not something to worry about, since we already have Photo ID
    > for our Passport and Driving License and an ID Card will be no
    > different to that. What you have not been told is the full scope of
    > this proposed ID Card, and what it will mean to you personally.
    >
    > The proposed ID Card will be different from any card you now hold. It
    > will be connected to a database called the NIR (or National Identity
    > Register), where all of your personal details will be stored. This
    > will include the unique number that will be issued to you, your
    > fingerprints, a scan of the back of your eye, and your photograph. Your
    > name, address and date of birth will also obviously be stored there.
    >
    > There will be spaces on this database for your religion, residence
    > status, and many other private and personal facts about you. There is
    > unlimited space for every other details of your life on the NIR
    > database, which can be expanded by the Government with or without
    > further Acts of Parliament.
    >
    > By itself, you might think that this register is harmless, but you
    > would be wrong to come to this conclusion. This new card will be used
    > to check your identity against your entry in the register in real time,
    > whenever you present it to 'prove who you are'.
    >
    > Every place that sells alcohol or cigarettes, every post office, every
    > pharmacy, and every Bank will have an NIR Card Terminal, (very much
    > like the Chip and Pin Readers that are everywhere now) into which your
    > card can be 'swiped' to check your identity. Each time this happens, a
    > record is made at the NIR of the time and place that the Card was
    > presented. This means for example, that there will be a government
    > record of every time you withdraw more than £99 at your branch of
    > NatWest, who now demand ID for these transactions. Every time you have
    > to prove that you are over 18, your card will be swiped, and a record
    > made at the NIR. Restaurants and off licenses will demand that your
    > card is swiped so that each receipt shows that they sold alcohol to
    > someone over 18, and that this was proved by the access to the NIR,
    > indemnifying them from prosecution.
    >
    > Private businesses are going to be given access to the NIR Database.
    > If you want to apply for a job, you will have to present your card for
    > a swipe. If you want to apply for a London Underground Oyster Card, or
    > a supermarket loyalty card, or a driving license you will have to
    > present your ID Card for a swipe. The same goes for getting a
    > telephone line or a mobile phone or an internet account.
    >
    > Oyster, DVLA, BT and Nectar (for example) all run very detailed
    > databases of their own. They will be allowed access to the NIR, just
    > as every other business will be. This means that each of these
    > entities will be able to store your unique number in their database,
    > and place all your travel, phone records, driving activities and
    > detailed shopping habits under your unique NIR number. These databases,
    > which can easily fit on a storage device the size of your hand, will be
    > sold to third parties either legally or illegally. It will then be
    > possible for a non-governmental entity to create a detailed dossier of
    > all your activities. Certainly, the government will have clandestine
    > access to all of them, meaning that they will have a complete record of
    > all your movements, from how much and when you withdraw from your bank
    > account to what medications you are taking, down to the level of what
    > sort of bread you eat - all accessible via a single unique number in a
    > Central database.
    >
    > This is quite a significant leap from a simple ID Card that shows
    > simply
    > your
    > name and face.
    >
    > Most people do not know that this is the true character and scope of
    > the proposed ID Card. Whenever the details of how it will work are
    > explained to them, they quickly change from being ambivalent towards
    > it.
    >
    > The Government is going to COMPEL you to enter your details into the
    > NIR and to carry this card. If you and your children want to obtain or
    > renew your passports, you will be forced to have your fingerprints
    > taken and your eyes scanned for the NIR, and an ID Card will be issued
    > to you whether you want one or not. If you refuse to be fingerprinted
    > and eye scanned, you will not be able to get a passport. Your ID Card
    > will, just like your passport, not be your property. The Home
    > Secretary will have the right to revoke or suspend your ID at any time,
    > meaning that you will not be able to withdraw money from your Bank
    > Account, for example, or do anything that requires you to present your
    > government issued ID Card.
    >
    > The arguments that have been put forwarded in favour of ID Cards can be
    > easily disproved. ID Cards WILL NOT stop terrorists; every Spaniard
    > has a compulsory ID Card as did the Madrid Bombers. ID Cards will not
    > 'eliminate benefit fraud', which in comparison, is small compared to
    > the astronomical cost of this proposal, which will be measured in
    > billions according to the LSE (London School of Economics). This scheme
    > exists solely to exert total surveillance and control over the ordinary
    > free British Citizen, and it will line the pockets of the companies
    > that will create the computer systems at the expense of your freedom,
    > privacy and money.
    >
    > If you did not know the full scope of the proposed ID Card Scheme
    > before and you are as unsettled as I am at what it really means to you,
    > to this country and its way of life, I urge you to email or photocopy
    > this and give it to your friends and colleagues and everyone else you
    > think should know and who cares. The Bill has proceeded to this stage
    > due to the lack of accurate and complete information on this proposal
    > being made public.
    >
    > Frances Stonor Saunders.
    >
    > Frances Stonor Saunders is the former arts editor of The New Statesman,
    > author of The Cultural Cold War, Diabolical Englishman and The Devil's
    > Broker, and was awarded the Royal Historical Society's William
    > Gladstone
    > Memorial Prize. She lives in London.
    >
    >
     
    antwine, Apr 26, 2006
    #3
  4. beenthere

    Tab Guest

    "antwine" <> wrote in message
    news:feP3g.3877$_c1.3613@fed1read05...
    > Wish they would do that here!
    > "beenthere" <> wrote in message
    > news:6uK3g.2$...
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >>
    >> Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >>

    Im not an illegal immigrant,nor do I break the law or draw Social Security
    so I have nothing to worry about
     
    Tab, Apr 26, 2006
    #4
  5. beenthere

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-04-26, D@Z <> wrote:
    > "beenthere" <> wrote in message
    > news:6uK3g.2$...
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >>
    >> Subject: ID cards are no joke


    snip

    > so wot?


    Presumably you are happy to be owned by the government and monitored in all
    you do and wherever you go, and potentially told where you can and can't
    go.

    ID cards are a reversal of the concept of the people being 'free' in any
    way. Ask South Africans about the 'dombook' or 'dompas', for instance.

    (Another thing: how did 'they' tell a Hutu from a Tutsi, or a Serb from
    a Croatian?).

    The proposed British system is far more than just a bit of plastic with a
    photo on it; the card is just a red herring in fact - the massive central
    database is what Blair & Co really want, that's where the power over us
    will come from - and no country anywhere on Earth has ever tried anything
    as invasive or far-reaching. Ireland rejected the idea, just; but
    Australia looks as though the same thing is going to be tried there -
    they've learned from Blair's mistake in one way though, John Howard is
    calling it an "access card"
    <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/04/26/aussie_pseudo_id/>.

    See also uk.politics.id-cards

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Apr 26, 2006
    #5
  6. beenthere

    beenthere Guest

    "Tab" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "antwine" <> wrote in message
    > news:feP3g.3877$_c1.3613@fed1read05...
    >> Wish they would do that here!
    >> "beenthere" <> wrote in message
    >> news:6uK3g.2$...
    >>>
    >>> Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >>>
    >>> Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >>>

    > Im not an illegal immigrant,nor do I break the law or draw Social Security
    > so I have nothing to worry about

    Me too.
    But, millions of people died in the 39-45 war to protect peoples`
    Freedom.
    And it doesn`t matter which `State` controls you, until you realise
    all your freedoms are gone.
     
    beenthere, Apr 26, 2006
    #6
  7. beenthere

    D@Z Guest

    they had ID cards during the 39-45 war for your information.....



    "beenthere" <> wrote in message
    news:6uK3g.2$...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >
    > Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >
    > PLEASE PASS THIS ON:
    >
    > You may have heard that legislation creating compulsory ID Cards
    > passed a crucial stage in the House of Commons. You may feel that ID
    > cards are not something to worry about, since we already have Photo ID
    > for our Passport and Driving License and an ID Card will be no
    > different to that. What you have not been told is the full scope of
    > this proposed ID Card, and what it will mean to you personally.
    >
    > The proposed ID Card will be different from any card you now hold. It
    > will be connected to a database called the NIR (or National Identity
    > Register), where all of your personal details will be stored. This
    > will include the unique number that will be issued to you, your
    > fingerprints, a scan of the back of your eye, and your photograph. Your
    > name, address and date of birth will also obviously be stored there.
    >
    > There will be spaces on this database for your religion, residence
    > status, and many other private and personal facts about you. There is
    > unlimited space for every other details of your life on the NIR
    > database, which can be expanded by the Government with or without
    > further Acts of Parliament.
    >
    > By itself, you might think that this register is harmless, but you
    > would be wrong to come to this conclusion. This new card will be used
    > to check your identity against your entry in the register in real time,
    > whenever you present it to 'prove who you are'.
    >
    > Every place that sells alcohol or cigarettes, every post office, every
    > pharmacy, and every Bank will have an NIR Card Terminal, (very much
    > like the Chip and Pin Readers that are everywhere now) into which your
    > card can be 'swiped' to check your identity. Each time this happens, a
    > record is made at the NIR of the time and place that the Card was
    > presented. This means for example, that there will be a government
    > record of every time you withdraw more than £99 at your branch of
    > NatWest, who now demand ID for these transactions. Every time you have
    > to prove that you are over 18, your card will be swiped, and a record
    > made at the NIR. Restaurants and off licenses will demand that your
    > card is swiped so that each receipt shows that they sold alcohol to
    > someone over 18, and that this was proved by the access to the NIR,
    > indemnifying them from prosecution.
    >
    > Private businesses are going to be given access to the NIR Database.
    > If you want to apply for a job, you will have to present your card for
    > a swipe. If you want to apply for a London Underground Oyster Card, or
    > a supermarket loyalty card, or a driving license you will have to
    > present your ID Card for a swipe. The same goes for getting a
    > telephone line or a mobile phone or an internet account.
    >
    > Oyster, DVLA, BT and Nectar (for example) all run very detailed
    > databases of their own. They will be allowed access to the NIR, just
    > as every other business will be. This means that each of these
    > entities will be able to store your unique number in their database,
    > and place all your travel, phone records, driving activities and
    > detailed shopping habits under your unique NIR number. These databases,
    > which can easily fit on a storage device the size of your hand, will be
    > sold to third parties either legally or illegally. It will then be
    > possible for a non-governmental entity to create a detailed dossier of
    > all your activities. Certainly, the government will have clandestine
    > access to all of them, meaning that they will have a complete record of
    > all your movements, from how much and when you withdraw from your bank
    > account to what medications you are taking, down to the level of what
    > sort of bread you eat - all accessible via a single unique number in a
    > Central database.
    >
    > This is quite a significant leap from a simple ID Card that shows
    > simply
    > your
    > name and face.
    >
    > Most people do not know that this is the true character and scope of
    > the proposed ID Card. Whenever the details of how it will work are
    > explained to them, they quickly change from being ambivalent towards
    > it.
    >
    > The Government is going to COMPEL you to enter your details into the
    > NIR and to carry this card. If you and your children want to obtain or
    > renew your passports, you will be forced to have your fingerprints
    > taken and your eyes scanned for the NIR, and an ID Card will be issued
    > to you whether you want one or not. If you refuse to be fingerprinted
    > and eye scanned, you will not be able to get a passport. Your ID Card
    > will, just like your passport, not be your property. The Home
    > Secretary will have the right to revoke or suspend your ID at any time,
    > meaning that you will not be able to withdraw money from your Bank
    > Account, for example, or do anything that requires you to present your
    > government issued ID Card.
    >
    > The arguments that have been put forwarded in favour of ID Cards can be
    > easily disproved. ID Cards WILL NOT stop terrorists; every Spaniard
    > has a compulsory ID Card as did the Madrid Bombers. ID Cards will not
    > 'eliminate benefit fraud', which in comparison, is small compared to
    > the astronomical cost of this proposal, which will be measured in
    > billions according to the LSE (London School of Economics). This scheme
    > exists solely to exert total surveillance and control over the ordinary
    > free British Citizen, and it will line the pockets of the companies
    > that will create the computer systems at the expense of your freedom,
    > privacy and money.
    >
    > If you did not know the full scope of the proposed ID Card Scheme
    > before and you are as unsettled as I am at what it really means to you,
    > to this country and its way of life, I urge you to email or photocopy
    > this and give it to your friends and colleagues and everyone else you
    > think should know and who cares. The Bill has proceeded to this stage
    > due to the lack of accurate and complete information on this proposal
    > being made public.
    >
    > Frances Stonor Saunders.
    >
    > Frances Stonor Saunders is the former arts editor of The New Statesman,
    > author of The Cultural Cold War, Diabolical Englishman and The Devil's
    > Broker, and was awarded the Royal Historical Society's William
    > Gladstone
    > Memorial Prize. She lives in London.
    >
    >
     
    D@Z, Apr 26, 2006
    #7
  8. beenthere wrote:
    > "Tab" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >>"antwine" <> wrote in message
    >>news:feP3g.3877$_c1.3613@fed1read05...
    >>
    >>>Wish they would do that here!
    >>>"beenthere" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:6uK3g.2$...
    >>>
    >>>>Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >>>>
    >>>>Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >>>>

    >>
    >>Im not an illegal immigrant,nor do I break the law or draw Social Security
    >>so I have nothing to worry about

    >
    > Me too.
    > But, millions of people died in the 39-45 war to protect peoples`
    > Freedom.
    > And it doesn`t matter which `State` controls you, until you realise
    > all your freedoms are gone.
    >
    >


    If it means my freedom to travel in an aeroplane without fear of some
    shithead sitting next to me with a pipe bomb shoved up his arse, then
    give me an ID card.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Brian_H=B9=A9?=, Apr 26, 2006
    #8
  9. beenthere

    beenthere Guest

    "Brian H¹©" <> wrote in message
    news:z3Q3g.62$...
    > beenthere wrote:
    >> "Tab" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>>"antwine" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:feP3g.3877$_c1.3613@fed1read05...
    >>>
    >>>>Wish they would do that here!
    >>>>"beenthere" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:6uK3g.2$...
    >>>>
    >>>>>Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >>>>>
    >>>
    >>>Im not an illegal immigrant,nor do I break the law or draw Social
    >>>Security so I have nothing to worry about

    >>
    >> Me too.
    >> But, millions of people died in the 39-45 war to protect peoples`
    >> Freedom.
    >> And it doesn`t matter which `State` controls you, until you realise
    >> all your freedoms are gone.

    >
    > If it means my freedom to travel in an aeroplane without fear of some
    > shithead sitting next to me with a pipe bomb shoved up his arse, then give
    > me an ID card.
    >

    Sadly Brian, you already know that an ID card won`t stop a pipe bomb,
    no matter how far out in front of you you hold it.
    How can anyone trust a Government that let`s over 1000 extra
    criminals out onto our streets, when they could have deported the
    lot of `em ?.
    This is about State control, not your\my\our safety
     
    beenthere, Apr 26, 2006
    #9
  10. beenthere

    beenthere Guest

    "D@Z" <> wrote in message
    news:444fcc66$...
    >
    >
    > they had ID cards during the 39-45 war for your information.....
    >

    I know D@Z, I was there !. I`m 74 years old. <g>.
    >
    > "beenthere" <> wrote in message
    > news:6uK3g.2$...
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >>
    >> Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >>
    >> PLEASE PASS THIS ON:
    >>
    >> You may have heard that legislation creating compulsory ID Cards
    >> passed a crucial stage in the House of Commons. You may feel that ID
    >> cards are not something to worry about, since we already have Photo ID
    >> for our Passport and Driving License and an ID Card will be no
    >> different to that. What you have not been told is the full scope of
    >> this proposed ID Card, and what it will mean to you personally.
    >>
    >> The proposed ID Card will be different from any card you now hold. It
    >> will be connected to a database called the NIR (or National Identity
    >> Register), where all of your personal details will be stored. This
    >> will include the unique number that will be issued to you, your
    >> fingerprints, a scan of the back of your eye, and your photograph. Your
    >> name, address and date of birth will also obviously be stored there.
    >>
    >> There will be spaces on this database for your religion, residence
    >> status, and many other private and personal facts about you. There is
    >> unlimited space for every other details of your life on the NIR
    >> database, which can be expanded by the Government with or without
    >> further Acts of Parliament.
    >>
    >> By itself, you might think that this register is harmless, but you
    >> would be wrong to come to this conclusion. This new card will be used
    >> to check your identity against your entry in the register in real time,
    >> whenever you present it to 'prove who you are'.
    >>
    >> Every place that sells alcohol or cigarettes, every post office, every
    >> pharmacy, and every Bank will have an NIR Card Terminal, (very much
    >> like the Chip and Pin Readers that are everywhere now) into which your
    >> card can be 'swiped' to check your identity. Each time this happens, a
    >> record is made at the NIR of the time and place that the Card was
    >> presented. This means for example, that there will be a government
    >> record of every time you withdraw more than £99 at your branch of
    >> NatWest, who now demand ID for these transactions. Every time you have
    >> to prove that you are over 18, your card will be swiped, and a record
    >> made at the NIR. Restaurants and off licenses will demand that your
    >> card is swiped so that each receipt shows that they sold alcohol to
    >> someone over 18, and that this was proved by the access to the NIR,
    >> indemnifying them from prosecution.
    >>
    >> Private businesses are going to be given access to the NIR Database.
    >> If you want to apply for a job, you will have to present your card for
    >> a swipe. If you want to apply for a London Underground Oyster Card, or
    >> a supermarket loyalty card, or a driving license you will have to
    >> present your ID Card for a swipe. The same goes for getting a
    >> telephone line or a mobile phone or an internet account.
    >>
    >> Oyster, DVLA, BT and Nectar (for example) all run very detailed
    >> databases of their own. They will be allowed access to the NIR, just
    >> as every other business will be. This means that each of these
    >> entities will be able to store your unique number in their database,
    >> and place all your travel, phone records, driving activities and
    >> detailed shopping habits under your unique NIR number. These databases,
    >> which can easily fit on a storage device the size of your hand, will be
    >> sold to third parties either legally or illegally. It will then be
    >> possible for a non-governmental entity to create a detailed dossier of
    >> all your activities. Certainly, the government will have clandestine
    >> access to all of them, meaning that they will have a complete record of
    >> all your movements, from how much and when you withdraw from your bank
    >> account to what medications you are taking, down to the level of what
    >> sort of bread you eat - all accessible via a single unique number in a
    >> Central database.
    >>
    >> This is quite a significant leap from a simple ID Card that shows
    >> simply
    >> your
    >> name and face.
    >>
    >> Most people do not know that this is the true character and scope of
    >> the proposed ID Card. Whenever the details of how it will work are
    >> explained to them, they quickly change from being ambivalent towards
    >> it.
    >>
    >> The Government is going to COMPEL you to enter your details into the
    >> NIR and to carry this card. If you and your children want to obtain or
    >> renew your passports, you will be forced to have your fingerprints
    >> taken and your eyes scanned for the NIR, and an ID Card will be issued
    >> to you whether you want one or not. If you refuse to be fingerprinted
    >> and eye scanned, you will not be able to get a passport. Your ID Card
    >> will, just like your passport, not be your property. The Home
    >> Secretary will have the right to revoke or suspend your ID at any time,
    >> meaning that you will not be able to withdraw money from your Bank
    >> Account, for example, or do anything that requires you to present your
    >> government issued ID Card.
    >>
    >> The arguments that have been put forwarded in favour of ID Cards can be
    >> easily disproved. ID Cards WILL NOT stop terrorists; every Spaniard
    >> has a compulsory ID Card as did the Madrid Bombers. ID Cards will not
    >> 'eliminate benefit fraud', which in comparison, is small compared to
    >> the astronomical cost of this proposal, which will be measured in
    >> billions according to the LSE (London School of Economics). This scheme
    >> exists solely to exert total surveillance and control over the ordinary
    >> free British Citizen, and it will line the pockets of the companies
    >> that will create the computer systems at the expense of your freedom,
    >> privacy and money.
    >>
    >> If you did not know the full scope of the proposed ID Card Scheme
    >> before and you are as unsettled as I am at what it really means to you,
    >> to this country and its way of life, I urge you to email or photocopy
    >> this and give it to your friends and colleagues and everyone else you
    >> think should know and who cares. The Bill has proceeded to this stage
    >> due to the lack of accurate and complete information on this proposal
    >> being made public.
    >>
    >> Frances Stonor Saunders.
    >>
    >> Frances Stonor Saunders is the former arts editor of The New Statesman,
    >> author of The Cultural Cold War, Diabolical Englishman and The Devil's
    >> Broker, and was awarded the Royal Historical Society's William
    >> Gladstone
    >> Memorial Prize. She lives in London.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    beenthere, Apr 26, 2006
    #10
  11. beenthere

    Jim Scott Guest

    On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 19:49:17 GMT, beenthere wrote:

    > "D@Z" <> wrote in message
    > news:444fcc66$...
    >>
    >>
    >> they had ID cards during the 39-45 war for your information.....
    >>

    > I know D@Z, I was there !. I`m 74 years old. <g>.
    >>

    But that was like your bus pass compared to this.
    --
    Jim
    Tyneside UK
    http://www.jimscot.plus.com
     
    Jim Scott, Apr 26, 2006
    #11
  12. beenthere

    Margolotta Guest

    On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 20:43:27 +0100, Brian H¹© wrote
    (in article <z3Q3g.62$>):

    > beenthere wrote:
    >> "Tab" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>> "antwine" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:feP3g.3877$_c1.3613@fed1read05...
    >>>
    >>>> Wish they would do that here!
    >>>> "beenthere" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:6uK3g.2$...
    >>>>
    >>>>> Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >>>>>
    >>>
    >>> Im not an illegal immigrant,nor do I break the law or draw Social Security
    >>> so I have nothing to worry about

    >>
    >> Me too.
    >> But, millions of people died in the 39-45 war to protect peoples`
    >> Freedom.
    >> And it doesn`t matter which `State` controls you, until you realise
    >> all your freedoms are gone.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > If it means my freedom to travel in an aeroplane without fear of some
    > shithead sitting next to me with a pipe bomb shoved up his arse, then
    > give me an ID card.


    Er, no Brian, it won't. There has been extensive research done to prove that
    the only people who'll be harmed by this piece of Draconian legislation will
    be the law-abiding citizen. It will have no effect on criminals. If a
    terrorist is going to blow up anything then you can be damned sure he can
    forge an ID card. Ditto with illegal immigrants - a couple of grand bunged to
    the right person(s) and he can have a fake card in a matter of days.

    The facts are as follows: -

    The problems with "ID Cards"

    Not just a card. The card is the least of it...

    The proposed identity management system has multiple layers



    The NIR (National Identity Register) ‹ individual checking and numbering of
    the population ‹ marking many personal details as "registrable facts" to be
    disclosed and constantly updated ‹ collection and checking of biometrics
    (e.g. fingerprints) ‹ the card itself ‹ a widespread scanner network and
    secure (one hopes) infrastructure connecting it to the central database ‹
    provision for use across the private and public sectors ‹ data-sharing
    between organisations on an unprecedented scale.


    Massive accumulation of personal data

    50 categories of registrable fact are set out in the Bill, though they could
    be added to. Effectively an index to all other official and quasi-official
    records, through cross-references and an audit trail of all checks on the
    Register, the NIR would be the key to a total life history of every
    individual, to be retained even after death.


    Lifelong surveillance and the meta-database


    Every registered individual will be under an obligation to notify any change
    in registrable facts. It is a clear aim of the system to require identity
    verification for many more civil transactions, the occasions to be stored in
    the audit trail. Information verified and indexed by numbers from the NIR
    would be easily cross-referenced in any database or set of databases. The
    "meta-database" of all the thousands of databases cross-referenced is much
    more powerful and much less secure than the NIR itself.


    Overseas ID cards are not comparable

    Many western countries that have ID cards do not have a shared register.
    Mostly ID cards have been limited in use, with strong legal privacy
    protections. In Germany centralisation is forbidden for historical reasons,
    and when cards are replaced, the records are not linked. Belgium has made use
    of modern encryption methods and local storage to protect privacy and prevent
    data-sharing, an approach opposite to the Home Office's. The UK scheme is
    closest to those of some Middle Eastern countries and of the People's
    Republic of China‹though the latter has largely given up on biometrics.

    The Government has not made a case. There is no evidence the system will
    produce the stated benefits. Less liberty does not imply greater security.

    Terrorism


    ID does not establish intention. Competent criminals and terrorists will be
    able to subvert the identity system. Random outrages by individuals can't be
    stopped. Ministers agree that ID cards will not prevent atrocities. A blank
    assertion that the department would find it helpful is not an argument that
    would be entertained for fundamental change in any other sphere of government
    but national security. Where is the evidence? Research suggests there is no
    link between the use of identity cards and the prevalence of terrorism, and
    in no instance has the presence of an identity card system been shown a
    significant deterrent to terrorist activity. Experts attest that ID
    unjustifiably presumed secure actually diminishes security.


    Illegal immigration and working


    People will still enter Britain using foreign documents‹genuine or forged‹and
    ID cards offer no more deterrent to people smugglers than passports and
    visas. Employers already face substantial penalties for failing to obtain
    proof of entitlement to work, yet there are only a handful of prosecutions a
    year.


    Benefit fraud and abuse of public services

    Identity is "only a tiny part of the problem in the benefit system." Figures
    for claims under false identity are estimated at £50 million (2.5%) of an
    (estimated) £2 billion per year in fraudulent claims.


    "Identity fraud"

    Both Australia and the USA have far worse problems of identity theft than
    Britain, precisely because of general reliance on a single reference source.
    Costs usually cited for of identity-related crime here include much fraud not
    susceptible to an ID system. Nominally "secure", trusted, ID is more useful
    to the fraudster. The Home Office has not explained how it will stop
    registration by identity thieves in the personae of innocent others. Coherent
    collection of all sensitive personal data by government, and its easy
    transmission between departments, will create vast new opportunities for
    data-theft.

    Overcomplicated, unproven technology #

    Computer system


    IT providers find that identity systems work best when limited in design. The
    Home Office scheme combines untested technologies on an unparalleled scale.
    Its many inchoate purposes create innumerable points for failure. The
    government record with computer projects is poor, and the ID system is likely
    to end up a broken mess.


    Biometrics

    Not all biometrics will work for all people. Plenty are missing digits, or
    eyes, or have physical conditions that render one or more biometrics unstable
    or hard to read. All systems have error. Deployment on a vast scale, with
    variably trained operators and variably maintained and calibrated equipment,
    will produce vast numbers of mismatches, leading to potentially gross
    inconvenience to millions.

    Identity Cards will cost money that could be better spent

    No ceiling


    The Government has not ventured figures for the cost to the country as whole
    of the identity management scheme. That makes evaluation difficult. Civil
    Service IT experience suggests current projections are likely to be seriously
    underestimated. Home Office figures are for internal costs only, and have
    risen sharply‹where they are not utterly obscure. Industry estimates suggest
    that public and private sector compliance costs could easily be double
    whatever is spent centrally.


    Opportunity costs


    The Government has not even tried to show that national ID management will be
    more cost-effective than less spectacular alternative, targeted, solutions to
    the same problems (whether tried and tested or novel). We are to trust to
    luck that it is.


    Taxpayer pain


    Even at current Home Office estimates, the additional tax burden of setting
    up the scheme will be of the order of £200 per person. The direct cost to
    individuals (of a combined passport and ID card package) is quoted as £93.
    The impact on other departmental and local authority budgets is unknown. The
    scope and impact of arbitrary penalties would make speed cameras trivial by
    comparison.

    Unchecked executive powers

    Broad delegated power

    The Home Office seeks wide discretion over the future shape of the scheme.
    There are more than 30 types of regulatory power for future Secretaries of
    State that would change the functions and content of the system ad lib. The
    scope, application and possible extension are extra-parliamentary decisions,
    even if nominally subject to approval.

    Presumption of accuracy

    Data entered onto the National Identity Register (NIR) is arbitrarily
    presumed to be accurate, and the Home Secretary made a judge of accuracy of
    information provided to him. Meanwhile, the Home Office gets the power to
    enter information without informing the individual. But theres no duty to
    ensure that such data is accurate, or criterion of accuracy. Personal
    identity is implicitly made wholly subject to state control.


    Compulsion by stealth


    Even during the so-called "voluntary phase", the Home Secretary can add any
    person to the Register without their consent, and categories of individuals
    might be compelled selectively to register using powers under any future
    legislation. Anyone newly applying for a passport or other "designated
    document", or renewing an existing one, will automatically have to be
    interviewed and submit all required details. This is less a phased
    introduction than a clandestine one. There is to be no choice. And the
    minimum of notice to the public about the change in the handling of their
    registrable information.

    Limited oversight

    As proposed, the National Identity Scheme Commissioner would have very
    limited powers and is excluded from considering a number of key issues. He
    does not even report directly to Parliament. The reliance on administrative
    penalties means severe punishments may be inflicted without judicial process.
    The onus is on the individual to seek relief from the courts, at a civil
    standard of proof. Those who most require the protection of a fair trial are
    the least likely to be able to resort to legal action.

    Individuals managed by executive order

    Without reference to the courts or any appeals process, the Home Secretary
    may cancel or require surrender of an identity card, without a right of
    appeal, at any time. Given that the object of the scheme is that an ID card
    will be eventually required to exercise any ordinary civil function, this
    amounts to granting the Home Secretary the power of civic life and death.

    The National Identity Register creates specific new threats to individuals

    Discrimination‹no guarantees

    There have been vapid "assurances" made to some minority groups. That
    underlines the potential for threat. The system offers a ready-made
    police-state tool for a future government less trustworthy than the current
    one. A Home Secretary could create classifications of individuals to be
    registered as he sees fit, introducing onerous duties backed by severe
    penalties for fractions of the population. Religious or ethnic affiliation,
    for example, could be added to the Register by regulation‹or be inferred by
    cross-referencing other information using a National Identity Register Number
    or associated data.

    "Papers, please"

    ID cards in practice would provide a pretext for those in authority‹public or
    private‹to question individuals who stand out for reasons of personal
    appearance or demeanour. This is likely to exacerbate divisions in society.
    The Chairman of the Bar Council has asked, "is there not a great risk that
    those who feel at the margins of society‹the somewhat disaffected‹will be
    driven into the arms of extremists?"


    Third party abuse

    The requirement that all those registered notify all changes in details risks
    creating the means of tracking and persecution through improper use of the
    database. A variety of persons have good reason to conceal their identity and
    whereabouts; for example: those fleeing domestic abuse; victims of "honour"
    crimes; witnesses in criminal cases; those at risk of kidnapping; undercover
    investigators; refugees from oppressive regimes overseas; those pursued by
    the press; those who may be terrorist targets. The seizure of ID cards (like
    benefit-books and passports now) will become a means for extortion by
    gangsters.

    Lost identity, becoming an un-person

    By making ordinary life dependent on the reliability of a complex
    administrative system, the scheme makes myriad small errors potentially
    catastrophic. There's no hint from the government how it will deal with
    inevitably large numbers of misidentifications and errors, or deliberate
    attacks on or corruption of what would become a critical piece of national
    infrastructure. A failure in any part of the system at a check might deny a
    person access to his or her rights or property or to public services, with no
    immediate solution or redress‹"license to live" withdrawn.


    The above is fact. ID cards will do NOTHING WHATSOEVER to stop any kind of
    illegal activity and will, almost certainly, increase it.

    Still like the idea, Brian...?
     
    Margolotta, Apr 26, 2006
    #12
  13. beenthere

    beenthere Guest

    "Jim Scott" <> wrote in message
    news:1hox2tsqwc2u1$...
    > On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 19:49:17 GMT, beenthere wrote:
    >
    >> "D@Z" <> wrote in message
    >> news:444fcc66$...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> they had ID cards during the 39-45 war for your information.....
    >>>

    >> I know D@Z, I was there !. I`m 74 years old. <g>.
    >>>

    > But that was like your bus pass compared to this.
    >

    Our identity cards didn`t stop the jerry bombs dropping on
    us in London then Jim
    >
    > Jim
    > Tyneside UK
    > http://www.jimscot.plus.com
     
    beenthere, Apr 26, 2006
    #13
  14. beenthere

    Margolotta Guest

    On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 20:39:28 +0100, D@Z wrote
    (in article <444fcc66$>):

    >
    >
    > they had ID cards during the 39-45 war for your information.....


    So what? The cards were just that - cards with someone's name and address on.
    I don't believe they even had a photo as the costs would have been
    prohibitive for a country at the time of war.

    Tell me: -

    1) Did they have computers during WWII? I mean computers that could store
    vast amounts of data in the way they can today?

    2) Had biometrics been invented?

    3) Did chip and PIN technology exist?

    4) Were law abiding citizens forced to carry them?

    5) Were you fined or sent to prison for not doing so?

    6) Did they enable the government to treat you like a criminal?

    7) Were you forced to pay, out of your own pocket, up to £300 for the
    privilege of being robbed of your liberty, dignity and privacy?

    It would appear that the facts have completely gone over your head. These are
    NOT just cards with someone's name, address and photo on - these are gross
    invasions of privacy and must be stopped at all costs.

    This borders on fascism. At the risk of invoking Godwin's Law in a thread
    that's only a half-dozen or so posts long, this will turn the country, in
    effect, into a concentration camp. So, yes, in one respect you are correct -
    it will be like being back in the Second World War again.
     
    Margolotta, Apr 26, 2006
    #14
  15. beenthere

    beenthere Guest

    "Margolotta" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 20:39:28 +0100, D@Z wrote
    > (in article <444fcc66$>):
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> they had ID cards during the 39-45 war for your information.....

    >
    > So what? The cards were just that - cards with someone's name and address
    > on.
    > I don't believe they even had a photo as the costs would have been
    > prohibitive for a country at the time of war.
    >
    > Tell me: -
    >
    > 1) Did they have computers during WWII? I mean computers that could store
    > vast amounts of data in the way they can today?
    >
    > 2) Had biometrics been invented?
    >
    > 3) Did chip and PIN technology exist?
    >
    > 4) Were law abiding citizens forced to carry them?
    >
    > 5) Were you fined or sent to prison for not doing so?
    >
    > 6) Did they enable the government to treat you like a criminal?
    >
    > 7) Were you forced to pay, out of your own pocket, up to £300 for the
    > privilege of being robbed of your liberty, dignity and privacy?
    >
    > It would appear that the facts have completely gone over your head. These
    > are
    > NOT just cards with someone's name, address and photo on - these are gross
    > invasions of privacy and must be stopped at all costs.
    >
    > This borders on fascism. At the risk of invoking Godwin's Law in a thread
    > that's only a half-dozen or so posts long, this will turn the country, in
    > effect, into a concentration camp. So, yes, in one respect you are
    > correct -
    > it will be like being back in the Second World War again.
    >

    love your tirade M.
    It`s seems you`ve really got the gist of what my OP was about.
    It if makes people Think, it will have been a worthwhile post,
    or is it, s some say `poast` <g>.
     
    beenthere, Apr 26, 2006
    #15
  16. beenthere

    beenthere Guest

    "Whiskers" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2006-04-26, D@Z <> wrote:
    >> "beenthere" <> wrote in message
    >> news:6uK3g.2$...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >>>
    >>> Subject: ID cards are no joke

    >
    > snip
    >
    >> so wot?

    >
    > Presumably you are happy to be owned by the government and monitored in
    > all
    > you do and wherever you go, and potentially told where you can and can't
    > go.
    >
    > ID cards are a reversal of the concept of the people being 'free' in any
    > way. Ask South Africans about the 'dombook' or 'dompas', for instance.
    >
    > (Another thing: how did 'they' tell a Hutu from a Tutsi, or a Serb from
    > a Croatian?).
    >
    > The proposed British system is far more than just a bit of plastic with a
    > photo on it; the card is just a red herring in fact - the massive central
    > database is what Blair & Co really want, that's where the power over us
    > will come from - and no country anywhere on Earth has ever tried anything
    > as invasive or far-reaching. Ireland rejected the idea, just; but
    > Australia looks as though the same thing is going to be tried there -
    > they've learned from Blair's mistake in one way though, John Howard is
    > calling it an "access card"
    > <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/04/26/aussie_pseudo_id/>.
    >
    > See also uk.politics.id-cards
    >

    nice one Whiskers, Perhaps a few `converts` will help to stop
    this cr*p happening to us all.
    (I should worry tho`, I`m too old to worry about all this anyway.
    Unless of course, `they` bring in compulsory euthanasia <G>.)
     
    beenthere, Apr 26, 2006
    #16
  17. beenthere

    pandamonium Guest

    On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 13:22:10 GMT, beenthere wrote:

    > Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >
    > Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >
    > PLEASE PASS THIS ON:
    >


    <SNIP>

    I'm afraid passing these circulars around won't help much. The next
    generations are already being conditioned into using their fingerprints in
    schools for library borrowing, registrations, paying for school trips. I
    even read of one school that plans to scan pupils' fingerprints in the
    canteen and keep a record of their lunchtime choices so that a nutrition
    profile can be built and sent to their parents. They're being conditioned
    into accepting it as the norm. All of those scary sci-fi films are coming
    true.

    You bunch of arseholes!

    --
    All replies to above email address are delivered to /dev/null
    If you really want to email me, replace nospam with liam
    http://www.eggwhisk.co.uk - Warning! Low quality drivel!
     
    pandamonium, Apr 26, 2006
    #17
  18. beenthere

    pandamonium Guest

    On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 21:56:56 +0100, pandamonium wrote:

    > On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 13:22:10 GMT, beenthere wrote:
    >
    >> Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >>
    >> Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >>
    >> PLEASE PASS THIS ON:
    >>

    >
    > <SNIP>
    >
    > I'm afraid passing these circulars around won't help much. The next
    > generations are already being conditioned into using their fingerprints in
    > schools for library borrowing, registrations, paying for school trips. I
    > even read of one school that plans to scan pupils' fingerprints in the
    > canteen and keep a record of their lunchtime choices so that a nutrition
    > profile can be built and sent to their parents. They're being conditioned
    > into accepting it as the norm. All of those scary sci-fi films are coming
    > true.
    >
    > You bunch of arseholes!


    Ah, knew I'd seen it somewhere:
    http://www.mailonsunday.co.uk/pages...ess.html?in_article_id=383913&in_page_id=1798

    Hairy armpitted sock sniffer!

    --
    All replies to above email address are delivered to /dev/null
    If you really want to email me, replace nospam with liam
    http://www.eggwhisk.co.uk - Warning! Low quality drivel!
     
    pandamonium, Apr 26, 2006
    #18
  19. beenthere

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-04-26, Brian H¹© <> wrote:
    > beenthere wrote:
    >> "Tab" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>>"antwine" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:feP3g.3877$_c1.3613@fed1read05...
    >>>
    >>>>Wish they would do that here!
    >>>>"beenthere" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:6uK3g.2$...
    >>>>
    >>>>>Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2006
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Subject: ID cards are no joke
    >>>>>
    >>>
    >>>Im not an illegal immigrant,nor do I break the law or draw Social Security
    >>>so I have nothing to worry about

    >>
    >> Me too.
    >> But, millions of people died in the 39-45 war to protect peoples`
    >> Freedom.
    >> And it doesn`t matter which `State` controls you, until you realise
    >> all your freedoms are gone.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > If it means my freedom to travel in an aeroplane without fear of some
    > shithead sitting next to me with a pipe bomb shoved up his arse, then
    > give me an ID card.


    I suspect that terrorists and suicide bombers and other criminals will
    have the very best ID cards, fully legal and legitimate and bang
    up-to-date. Like the ones who flew those planes into the WTC, and the
    ones who bombed the trains in Spain, and all those suicide bombers in th
    'Holy Land'.

    They might even have yours.

    But if you get stopped for speeding or for walking in a supicious manner
    the day after you forgot to queue up at the local registration office to
    get your 'ID Card' updated with your new address o beard, then you'll be
    in for a very uncomfortable few days.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Apr 26, 2006
    #19
  20. beenthere

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-04-26, beenthere <> wrote:
    >
    > "Jim Scott" <> wrote in message
    > news:1hox2tsqwc2u1$...
    >> On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 19:49:17 GMT, beenthere wrote:
    >>
    >>> "D@Z" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:444fcc66$...
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> they had ID cards during the 39-45 war for your information.....
    >>>>
    >>> I know D@Z, I was there !. I`m 74 years old. <g>.
    >>>>

    >> But that was like your bus pass compared to this.


    Mine didn't even have a photo on it (I was too young). It was just a piece
    of card with typed and hand-written answers to printed questions.

    > Our identity cards didn`t stop the jerry bombs dropping on
    > us in London then Jim


    Oh, the Germans had ID cards too. Probably more efficient than ours.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Apr 26, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. falsename
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    1,372
    Hendrik Maryns
    Dec 7, 2005
  2. Bill Schowengerdt

    What are British Council taxes?

    Bill Schowengerdt, Oct 4, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    78
    Views:
    1,733
    Brian H¹©
    Oct 9, 2003
  3. PuppyKatt

    British-type siren on startup

    PuppyKatt, Jan 6, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    2,054
  4. Rob K

    Best British comedy

    Rob K, Jan 11, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    43
    Views:
    1,435
    slumpy
    Jan 16, 2004
  5. Ch. Rajinder Nijjhar Jatt

    Language British English Spell Check American

    Ch. Rajinder Nijjhar Jatt, Nov 8, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    633
Loading...

Share This Page