Brit police assert their right to try to bolster P.M. Brown'sterrible poll numbers

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Jan 23, 2010.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    He's riding along at about 28% and a major terror alert is issued. No
    surprise. I remember this from the U.S. happening more than a few
    times.

    BBC:

    Photographers' terror law protest

    Professional and amateur photographers have gathered in London's
    Trafalgar Square to protest against terror stop and searches.

    The photographers say police are intimidating people with cameras in
    tactics to target possible terrorists.

    Last week the European Court of Human Rights ruled the power to stop
    people without suspicion was indiscriminate.

    The government is appealing, saying it is vital to make cities a
    hostile place for any possible attacker.

    Rising tensions

    Freelance photographer and writer Marc Vallee, who helped organise the
    protest, said: "It's quite surreal today but we are pleased with the
    support.

    "It's quite obvious that professional photographers across the country
    are being searched because they are photographers not because they are
    suspicious.

    "It's a common law right to take pictures in public places and we are
    here to show that."

    The demonstration comes after a year of rising tensions between
    professional photographers and police over the exact scope of Section
    44 of the Terrorism Act 2000.
    “ Stories of photographers being stopped for taking pictures have
    become a regular feature ”
    Phil Coomes BBC News website picture editor

    This special stop and search power allows police in specifically
    designated areas to stop people without suspicion of wrongdoing in an
    attempt to make it difficult for potential attackers to move around.

    It is used in some key areas of London and other cities or airports
    where counter-terrorism officers suspect that violent extremists may
    be looking for targets.

    According to the latest available figures, some 36,000 people were
    stopped under the power between April and June last year.

    But photographers say the practical effect has been that increasing
    numbers of people with cameras are being left intimidated, angry and
    afraid after being asked to account for their actions.

    Shami Chakrabarti, director of human rights group Liberty, said it had
    warned of the dangers of blanket stop and search for a decade.

    She said: "We have been completely vindicated by the Court of Human
    Rights and in the coming weeks MPs will have the chance to change this
    law. Let's hope they step up to their responsibilities."

    A series of controversial incidents over the past year have included
    photographers being stopped while taking pictures of landmarks and
    public buildings.

    A separate counter-terrorism law, which in theory restricts the rights
    to photograph police officers, has added to the tensions.

    Advice to officers

    Shortly before Christmas, Assistant Commissioner John Yates, the head
    of counter-terrorism at the Metropolitan Police, warned officers they
    risked losing public confidence if they did not use the Section 44
    powers sensibly.
    “ In my view, section 44 is being used far too often on a random basis
    without any reasoning behind its use ”
    Lord Carlile Government independent reviewer of anti-terrorist
    legislation

    But last week the European Court of Human Rights ruled the entire law
    was illegal because it was indiscriminate rather than properly
    targeted at the threat.

    The government is appealing against that ruling and the power remains
    in force in the meantime.

    Chief Constable Craig Mackey, the Association of Chief Police
    Officers' (Acpo) spokesman on stop and search, said: "Acpo has stated
    previously that everyone - photographers, members of the media and the
    general public - has a right to take photographs and film in public
    places. That has not changed.

    "It is the job of police officers out on the beat to be vigilant, to
    keep an eye out for any suspicious behaviour and to act accordingly.

    "And there is no doubt that every day their vigilance stops crime.
    Used correctly, stop and search is a powerful tool that can help
    protect all our communities from terrorism. Protecting the public
    remains our priority."
     
    RichA, Jan 23, 2010
    #1
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  2. RichA

    p Guest

    RichA wrote:
    > He's riding along at about 28% and a major terror alert is issued. No
    > surprise. I remember this from the U.S. happening more than a few
    > times.
    >



    Sometimes we need protection from our protectors.


    Peter
     
    p, Jan 23, 2010
    #2
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  3. Re: Brit police assert their right to try to bolster P.M. Brown's terrible poll numbers

    In article <a2a9a2d9-b750-4eda-b164-
    >, says...
    >
    > BBC:
    >
    > Photographers' terror law protest
    >


    It's disgraceful. I saw first signs of this when, shortly after first
    coming into power, Blair and Brown tabled a proposal to allow the police
    to indiscriminately read everybody's email, and requiring ISP to keep
    records of all their customers' activities for the plods to peruse at
    will. (nb: you need a judge to ok reading somebody's snail mail or
    tapping their phone; sooo .... ?!?)

    I was wondering at the time why there wasn't a huge outcry in Britain.

    These guys are on the path to make George Orwell's 1984 come true. Evil
    bastards, the both of them, I'm sure a lot of ex-Stasi agents are
    looking on with envy (too late for the ex-Gestapo guys; they're gone).
    They're working hard to abolish the freedom and security that they're
    claiming to protect. {shudder}

    -P.
     
    Peter Huebner, Jan 24, 2010
    #3
  4. RichA

    RichA Guest

    On Jan 23, 9:03 pm, Peter Huebner <> wrote:
    > In article <a2a9a2d9-b750-4eda-b164-
    > >, says...
    >
    >
    >
    > > BBC:

    >
    > >  Photographers' terror law protest

    >
    > It's disgraceful. I saw first signs of this when, shortly after first
    > coming into power, Blair and Brown tabled a proposal to allow the police
    > to indiscriminately read everybody's email, and requiring ISP to keep
    > records of all their customers' activities for the plods to peruse at
    > will. (nb: you need a judge to ok reading somebody's snail mail or
    > tapping their phone; sooo .... ?!?)


    The NSA sent them both a lovely Christmas basket over that one.
     
    RichA, Jan 24, 2010
    #4
  5. RichA

    Marcus Guest

    Re: Brit police assert their right to try to bolster P.M. Brown's terrible poll numbers

    On Sun, 24 Jan 2010 15:03:05 +1300, Peter Huebner <>
    wrote this:

    >It's disgraceful. I saw first signs of this when, shortly after first
    >coming into power, Blair and Brown tabled a proposal to allow the police
    >to indiscriminately read everybody's email, and requiring ISP to keep
    >records of all their customers' activities for the plods to peruse at
    >will. (nb: you need a judge to ok reading somebody's snail mail or
    >tapping their phone; sooo .... ?!?)


    I thought it was that great campaigner against totalitarian regimes
    Jack Straw when he was Home Secretary?

    Well he appeared to be, in his student days, such a campaigner!!!

    Marcus
    ..
    -------- The Simon Phenomenon ---------
    "Conformity means death for any community. A loyal
    opposition is a necessity in any community."
    Said Karol Wojtyla (1969)
    As he set about destroying those who disagreed with him.
    -------- Oh! Well!! He was Pope. ----------
     
    Marcus, Jan 24, 2010
    #5
  6. RichA

    Adrian Guest

    Re: Brit police assert their right to try to bolster P.M. Brown's terrible poll numbers

    On Sat, 23 Jan 2010 18:17:04 +0000, RichA wrote
    (in article
    <>):

    > Shortly before Christmas, Assistant Commissioner John Yates, the head
    > of counter-terrorism at the Metropolitan Police, warned officers they
    > risked losing public confidence if they did not use the Section 44
    > powers sensibly.


    I am afraid it is already to late to worry about loss of confidence. I am a
    63 year old retired engineer who for most of my life has been a strong
    supporter of our police.

    That is now a thing of the past and while I am sure there are still some
    decent individual coppers, as an institution the police are pretty much a law
    unto themselves and government, and certainly no longer defenders of the
    public and our liberty.

    No, we are not moving towards a police state, we have already arrived, and
    that is something I never thought I would say.

    RIP Freedom, Liberty and Privacy

    Adrian
     
    Adrian, Jan 24, 2010
    #6
  7. Re: Brit police assert their right to try to bolster P.M. Brown's terrible poll numbers

    In article
    <>,
    RichA <> writes
    >BBC:
    >
    > Photographers' terror law protest
    >
    >Professional and amateur photographers have gathered in London's
    >Trafalgar Square to protest against terror stop and searches.
    >
    >The photographers say police are intimidating people with cameras in
    >tactics to target possible terrorists.
    >

    <SNIP>
    >"It's quite obvious that professional photographers across the country
    >are being searched because they are photographers not because they are
    >suspicious.
    >
    >"It's a common law right to take pictures in public places and we are
    >here to show that."
    >


    What is the use of mass protest like the Trafalgar Square rally? All it
    shows is that nobody agrees with the current legislation but does
    nothing to change it.

    Instead, why doesn't every professional and amateur photographer in the
    country abide by Section 44 of the 2009 Anti-terrorism Law to its finest
    letter and *refuse* to photograph or publish any image of the political
    parties, their enforcers the police, or their financiers the bankers and
    landed gentry until *after* the General Election on May 6th. It will be
    interesting to see what sort of government the UK elect if they are
    reduced to media coverage typical of 2 centuries ago.

    Would anyone know who Peter Mandelson or Jack Straw was if their face
    wasn't plastered across the UK media every day? It is in the power of
    photographers and videographers to shut these fuckwits up. Completely
    and legally - as a consequence of the laws the idiots voted in!

    You will see the law being changed soon enough when the political
    parties and the ruling class are starved of the publicity they crave!
    --
    Kennedy
    Yes, Socrates himself is particularly missed;
    A lovely little thinker, but a bugger when he's pissed.
    Python Philosophers (replace 'nospam' with 'kennedym' when replying)
     
    Kennedy McEwen, Jan 24, 2010
    #7
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