bright window in background

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ted medin, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. ted medin

    ted medin Guest

    My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground. I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to solve those darkfaces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA
    ted medin, Apr 12, 2012
    #1
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  2. ted medin

    OG Guest

    On 12/04/2012 23:23, ted medin wrote:
    > My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground. I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA


    Use your flash.
    OG, Apr 13, 2012
    #2
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  3. ted medin

    tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 12 Apr 2012 15:23:13 -0700 (PDT), ted medin
    <> wrote:

    >My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground. I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA


    Use fill flash, preferably with a bounced light, and set the camera to
    spot metering instead of matrix (or whatever Canon calls averaging the
    full frame) metering.

    If you use Photoshop or Elements, "Shadows/Highlights" with the
    midtones set to 15% will help. If it's really bad, you'll have to
    make a selection and lighten just the selection.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Apr 13, 2012
    #3
  4. ted medin <> writes:

    > My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in
    > the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the
    > foreground. I have tried a number of photo editors but need some
    > advice on how to solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA


    Your meter was fooled into underexposing, so increasing exposure is what
    you do. In Adobe Camera Raw, I'd move the exposure slider to the
    right. If it wasn't a RAW image (I shoot nearly entirely RAW, but lots
    of people do things differently), then I'd use the Curves control to
    brighten the mid-tones, or else use the shadow/highlight too.

    What's available and what it's called varies by product of course.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
    David Dyer-Bennet, Apr 13, 2012
    #4
  5. OG <> writes:

    > On 12/04/2012 23:23, ted medin wrote:


    >> My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in
    >> the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the
    >> foreground. I have tried a number of photo editors but need some
    >> advice on how to solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA


    > Use your flash.


    That would give a very different look, and can't be applied after the
    fact. If you wanted a flash-type picture it's certainly the way to go,
    though.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
    David Dyer-Bennet, Apr 13, 2012
    #5
  6. tony cooper <> writes:

    > On Thu, 12 Apr 2012 15:23:13 -0700 (PDT), ted medin
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground. I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA

    >
    > Use fill flash, preferably with a bounced light, and set the camera to
    > spot metering instead of matrix (or whatever Canon calls averaging the
    > full frame) metering.


    Mind you, this is *exactly* the situation used to advertise "matrix" or
    "evaluative" metering when it was new; I'm kind of disappointed at how
    badly it actually handles this sort of thing.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
    David Dyer-Bennet, Apr 13, 2012
    #6
  7. ted medin

    eatmorepies Guest

    "ted medin" <> wrote in message
    news:24898229.660.1334269393293.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@yneo2...
    My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in the
    background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground. I have
    tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to solve those
    dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA

    Not in the correct order ......

    1. Use fill in flash.

    2. Shoot in RAW when in such circumstances. Always a good idea but solving
    the problem with the RAW editor is not as good as getting a decent image in
    the first place.

    3. Overexpose by a stop or two.

    0. Look at your histogram. Take a shot and view the histogram - there will
    probably be tall peak over on the highlight side - this will be the window.
    This will inform you to engage in action (1) or (2). Experiment with (1) and
    (2) using the histogram to inform you.

    John
    eatmorepies, Apr 13, 2012
    #7
  8. ted medin

    otter Guest

    On Thursday, April 12, 2012 5:23:13 PM UTC-5, ted wrote:
    > My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground. I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA


    I had to look up the A530. Looks like it is a 6 yr old powershot with 5 megapixels. A cursory look at the specs didn't turn up a mention of RAW capability, and I expect you don't have that option.

    The first thing to try, like others said, is to use a photo editing tool like elements or lightroom (or several others) and just boost the "fill". That will lighten dark areas, and is often all that is needed.

    If you want to get fancy, you can read up on HDR, and try that, but you areprobably limited by your equipment.
    otter, Apr 14, 2012
    #8
  9. ted medin

    TheRealSteve Guest

    On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 00:57:10 -0700 (PDT), otter
    <> wrote:

    >On Thursday, April 12, 2012 5:23:13 PM UTC-5, ted wrote:
    >> My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in
    >> the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground.
    >> I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to
    >> solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA

    >
    >I had to look up the A530. Looks like it is a 6 yr old powershot with 5
    >megapixels. A cursory look at the specs didn't turn up a mention of
    >RAW capability, and I expect you don't have that option.


    However, that A530 will run CHDK which can give him RAW output, DNG
    format. That would help some in post processing.

    His only really good solutions to his problem is either fill flash or
    HDR. That camera can do exposure compensation of +/- 2EV with the
    Canon firmware but way more and auto braketing with CHDK.

    RAW DNG output with auto braketing and some HDR software sounds like
    the way to go if he doesn't want a fill flash. Although fill flash
    sure is a lot simpler.

    sTEVE
    TheRealSteve, Apr 14, 2012
    #9
  10. ted medin

    otter Guest

    On Saturday, April 14, 2012 9:38:19 AM UTC-5, TheRealSteve wrote:
    > On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 00:57:10 -0700 (PDT), otter
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >On Thursday, April 12, 2012 5:23:13 PM UTC-5, ted wrote:
    > >> My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in
    > >> the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground.
    > >> I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to
    > >> solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA

    > >
    > >I had to look up the A530. Looks like it is a 6 yr old powershot with 5
    > >megapixels. A cursory look at the specs didn't turn up a mention of
    > >RAW capability, and I expect you don't have that option.

    >
    > However, that A530 will run CHDK which can give him RAW output, DNG
    > format. That would help some in post processing.
    >
    > His only really good solutions to his problem is either fill flash or
    > HDR. That camera can do exposure compensation of +/- 2EV with the
    > Canon firmware but way more and auto braketing with CHDK.
    >
    > RAW DNG output with auto braketing and some HDR software sounds like
    > the way to go if he doesn't want a fill flash. Although fill flash
    > sure is a lot simpler.
    >
    > sTEVE


    Oh yeah, didn't think about CHDK. That would help, but its not for the casual user.
    otter, Apr 14, 2012
    #10
  11. ted medin

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 10:38:19 -0400, TheRealSteve <>
    wrote:

    >
    >On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 00:57:10 -0700 (PDT), otter
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Thursday, April 12, 2012 5:23:13 PM UTC-5, ted wrote:
    >>> My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in
    >>> the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground.
    >>> I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to
    >>> solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA

    >>
    >>I had to look up the A530. Looks like it is a 6 yr old powershot with 5
    >>megapixels. A cursory look at the specs didn't turn up a mention of
    >>RAW capability, and I expect you don't have that option.

    >
    >However, that A530 will run CHDK which can give him RAW output, DNG
    >format. That would help some in post processing.
    >
    >His only really good solutions to his problem is either fill flash or
    >HDR. That camera can do exposure compensation of +/- 2EV with the
    >Canon firmware but way more and auto braketing with CHDK.
    >
    >RAW DNG output with auto braketing and some HDR software sounds like
    >the way to go if he doesn't want a fill flash. Although fill flash
    >sure is a lot simpler.
    >

    The Canon A530 is a 5.0 megapixel point-and-shoot that be purchased on
    eBay for as little as $20. It doesn't have a hot shoe, so fill flash
    is going to be chancy.

    Why would anyone bother to add CHDK to this camera?

    Why would someone buy HDR software to use on the type of photos you'll
    get with this camera?

    If it takes acceptable outdoor snapshots, use it for that. That's
    probably all the poster is interested in except for this one type of
    shot. The easy solution is to not pose the person in front of a
    window.




    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Apr 14, 2012
    #11
  12. ted medin

    TheRealSteve Guest

    On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 14:15:09 -0400, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 10:38:19 -0400, TheRealSteve <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 00:57:10 -0700 (PDT), otter
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Thursday, April 12, 2012 5:23:13 PM UTC-5, ted wrote:
    >>>> My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in
    >>>> the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground.
    >>>> I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to
    >>>> solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA
    >>>
    >>>I had to look up the A530. Looks like it is a 6 yr old powershot with 5
    >>>megapixels. A cursory look at the specs didn't turn up a mention of
    >>>RAW capability, and I expect you don't have that option.

    >>
    >>However, that A530 will run CHDK which can give him RAW output, DNG
    >>format. That would help some in post processing.
    >>
    >>His only really good solutions to his problem is either fill flash or
    >>HDR. That camera can do exposure compensation of +/- 2EV with the
    >>Canon firmware but way more and auto braketing with CHDK.
    >>
    >>RAW DNG output with auto braketing and some HDR software sounds like
    >>the way to go if he doesn't want a fill flash. Although fill flash
    >>sure is a lot simpler.
    >>

    >The Canon A530 is a 5.0 megapixel point-and-shoot that be purchased on
    >eBay for as little as $20. It doesn't have a hot shoe, so fill flash
    >is going to be chancy.
    >
    >Why would anyone bother to add CHDK to this camera?
    >
    >Why would someone buy HDR software to use on the type of photos you'll
    >get with this camera?


    Because the camera is cheap, CHDK is free and fun to play around with
    and the combination with HDR software can give impressive results
    considering the price of the equipment. Sometimes it's fun to play
    around like we used to do in a darkroom but now do with software.

    >If it takes acceptable outdoor snapshots, use it for that. That's
    >probably all the poster is interested in except for this one type of
    >shot. The easy solution is to not pose the person in front of a
    >window.


    Not doing it certainly is the easy solution.

    Steve
    TheRealSteve, Apr 15, 2012
    #12
  13. ted medin

    ted medin Guest

    I want to thank all of u for taking the time to advise a casual user. I have been looking for a good excuse to buy a better camera so that's what i will do. Thanks!
    ted medin, Apr 15, 2012
    #13
  14. On 4/13/12 PDT 8:29 AM, David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > tony cooper<> writes:
    >
    >> On Thu, 12 Apr 2012 15:23:13 -0700 (PDT), ted medin
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground. I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA

    >>
    >> Use fill flash, preferably with a bounced light, and set the camera to
    >> spot metering instead of matrix (or whatever Canon calls averaging the
    >> full frame) metering.

    >
    > Mind you, this is *exactly* the situation used to advertise "matrix" or
    > "evaluative" metering when it was new; I'm kind of disappointed at how
    > badly it actually handles this sort of thing.


    Interesting to me that the iPhone 4G handles this pretty well.
    Exceptionally well for a tiny camera. When you tap on, say, a face or
    chest, it both focuses there, and meters that area delineated by a box
    on the screen.
    John McWilliams, Apr 15, 2012
    #14
  15. ted medin

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <26637096.965.1334418741385.JavaMail.geo-discussion-
    forums@ynee1>, says...
    >
    > On Saturday, April 14, 2012 9:38:19 AM UTC-5, TheRealSteve wrote:
    > > On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 00:57:10 -0700 (PDT), otter
    > > <> wrote:
    > >
    > > >On Thursday, April 12, 2012 5:23:13 PM UTC-5, ted wrote:
    > > >> My canon a530 does good outdoors but indoor with a bright window in
    > > >> the background the printed pictures show dark faces in the foreground.
    > > >> I have tried a number of photo editors but need some advice on how to
    > > >> solve those dark faces. Anyone got any ideas? TIA
    > > >
    > > >I had to look up the A530. Looks like it is a 6 yr old powershot with 5
    > > >megapixels. A cursory look at the specs didn't turn up a mention of
    > > >RAW capability, and I expect you don't have that option.

    > >
    > > However, that A530 will run CHDK which can give him RAW output, DNG
    > > format. That would help some in post processing.
    > >
    > > His only really good solutions to his problem is either fill flash or
    > > HDR. That camera can do exposure compensation of +/- 2EV with the
    > > Canon firmware but way more and auto braketing with CHDK.
    > >
    > > RAW DNG output with auto braketing and some HDR software sounds like
    > > the way to go if he doesn't want a fill flash. Although fill flash
    > > sure is a lot simpler.
    > >
    > > sTEVE

    >
    > Oh yeah, didn't think about CHDK. That would help, but its not for the casual user.


    The A530 can be set for spot metering, which exists pretty much for the
    situation described. Meter on the faces. If you can't stand having the
    window highlight blown, then it's time to get fancy.
    J. Clarke, Apr 15, 2012
    #15
  16. ted medin

    Bruce Guest

    ted medin <> wrote:

    >I want to thank all of u for taking the time to advise a casual user. I have been looking for a good excuse to buy a better camera so that's what i will do. Thanks!



    There is no camera - at any price - that will expose correctly in an
    automatic mode for the faces of people in the situation you describe.

    The camera you already own is perfectly suitable to obtain correctly
    exposed faces in the situation you described. You just need to learn
    how to use it properly. A little informed manual intervention by you
    would easily solve the "problem".

    Don't waste your money on more expensive equipment that will not solve
    the "problem". Just learn how to use what you already have.
    Bruce, Apr 15, 2012
    #16
  17. ted medin

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Bruce
    <> wrote:

    > There is no camera - at any price - that will expose correctly in an
    > automatic mode for the faces of people in the situation you describe.


    a camera with face detection will.
    nospam, Apr 15, 2012
    #17
  18. ted medin

    TheRealSteve Guest

    On Sun, 15 Apr 2012 10:25:16 -0400, nospam <>
    wrote:

    >In article <>, Bruce
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> There is no camera - at any price - that will expose correctly in an
    >> automatic mode for the faces of people in the situation you describe.

    >
    >a camera with face detection will.


    No it won't. It will just blow the highlights coming through the
    window. You can do the same thing as face detection by spot metering
    on the face and it still won't solve his problem.

    Steve
    TheRealSteve, Apr 15, 2012
    #18
  19. ted medin

    TheRealSteve Guest

    On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 17:03:47 -0700 (PDT), ted medin
    <> wrote:

    >I want to thank all of u for taking the time to advise a casual user. I have
    > been looking for a good excuse to buy a better camera so that's what
    > i will do. Thanks!


    A better camera isn't going to help much in your situation unless you
    learn how to use it, which you can do with that A530.

    Steve
    TheRealSteve, Apr 15, 2012
    #19
  20. ted medin

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, TheRealSteve
    <> wrote:

    > >> There is no camera - at any price - that will expose correctly in an
    > >> automatic mode for the faces of people in the situation you describe.

    > >
    > >a camera with face detection will.

    >
    > No it won't. It will just blow the highlights coming through the
    > window.


    it depends how bright it is outside, how dark it is inside and how wide
    a dynamic range the camera can capture. it may work out just fine (and
    probably will), but there's always going to be an extreme where it
    won't.

    he also said 'at any price', so if money is no object, a camera that
    has sufficient dynamic range for whatever scene is out there can be
    designed and built.

    > You can do the same thing as face detection by spot metering
    > on the face and it still won't solve his problem.


    sure, but the issue was 'automatic mode.'
    nospam, Apr 16, 2012
    #20
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