bright walls

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by jem, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. jem

    jem Guest

    I am going to pick up the manuel as soon as I send this post...

    I am not very well versed in photography but I own a Fuji 9000. I bought it
    becaue I thought it would automaticlly keep me from getting into trouble....

    Last week I took a picture of a building early in the morning, the sun was
    low but very bright. The brick wall of the building looked almost white.

    Today I took a picture of a wood framed house this morning and the house
    looked almost white... the details were almost undetectable.

    I took other photos in telephoto of other than the outside walls of the
    house and they were fine.

    Solution?

    Thanks,

    jem
    jem, Mar 30, 2006
    #1
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  2. jem

    Crash Gordon Guest

    Read the manual - at least skim through it. Nothing will automatically keep
    you out of trouble...not even Spel Chek.




    "jem" <> wrote in message
    news:%IGWf.70$...
    |I am going to pick up the manuel as soon as I send this post...
    |
    | I am not very well versed in photography but I own a Fuji 9000. I bought
    it
    | becaue I thought it would automaticlly keep me from getting into
    trouble....
    |
    | Last week I took a picture of a building early in the morning, the sun was
    | low but very bright. The brick wall of the building looked almost white.
    |
    | Today I took a picture of a wood framed house this morning and the house
    | looked almost white... the details were almost undetectable.
    |
    | I took other photos in telephoto of other than the outside walls of the
    | house and they were fine.
    |
    | Solution?
    |
    | Thanks,
    |
    | jem
    |
    |
    |
    Crash Gordon, Mar 30, 2006
    #2
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  3. jem

    ASAAR Guest

    On Wed, 29 Mar 2006 20:43:24 -0500, jem wrote:

    > I am not very well versed in photography but I own a Fuji 9000. I bought it
    > becaue I thought it would automaticlly keep me from getting into trouble....


    Only very cheap, limited cameras make an attempt to keep
    photographers from getting into trouble, and they can't always
    succeed. Good cameras offer you the options necessary to get good
    pictures when conditions are less than optimal. No camera is
    omniscient, it's up to the photographer to come to the camera's aid
    when it's confused.


    > Last week I took a picture of a building early in the morning, the sun was
    > low but very bright. The brick wall of the building looked almost white.
    >
    > Today I took a picture of a wood framed house this morning and the house
    > looked almost white... the details were almost undetectable.
    >
    > I took other photos in telephoto of other than the outside walls of the
    > house and they were fine.


    Your camera has several metering modes. Which one did you use?
    Assuming that you know something about histograms, do the ones for
    your overexposed buildings appear to show reasonable exposures or
    not? Lastly, make sure that you haven't accidentally set the camera
    to use excessive exposure compensation. If you have, then disabling
    it would probably fix your building's walls, but then your other
    shots might appear too dark, so either way, you have to figure out
    how your camera is calculating its exposure. Without checking, can
    you state whether it's using spot metering, area or some kind of
    matrix metering? If it's using spot metering, perhaps it got the
    reading off some very dark portion of the building, such as a black
    door, etc. If not using spot metering, did the scene include any
    large areas that are darker than the building's walls, but which
    don't appear as dark as they should be, such as a large green lawn,
    or a black asphalt paved driveway or parking lot?


    > Solution?


    Understand that errors of this type aren't unique to digital
    cameras, and you could have gotten the same results with a 50 year
    old film camera. Most important is knowing (or learning) general
    photographic principles. If you already have some knowledge in this
    area, then read your camera's manual to learn what kind of metering
    options the S9000 has, and which would be more appropriately used in
    conditions where lighting or the subject's coloring presents
    difficulties. Familiarizing yourself with histograms might help get
    you up to speed (at which point you can start using them much more
    sparingly), and I assume that the S9000 can show them before you
    take the picture. If, as with some cameras, it only shows the
    histograms after taking pictures, it's still about as useful, but
    slightly less convenient. Some cameras have a special histogram
    mode that also indicates extreme problem areas in the image, where
    it's too dark for shadow detail or so bright that highlights are
    blown. Check the manual to see if the Fuji S9000 has this feature.
    ASAAR, Mar 30, 2006
    #3
  4. jem

    Stewy Guest

    In article <%IGWf.70$>, "jem" <>
    wrote:

    > I am going to pick up the manuel as soon as I send this post...
    >
    > I am not very well versed in photography but I own a Fuji 9000. I bought it
    > becaue I thought it would automaticlly keep me from getting into trouble....


    Well that depends on what you take pictures of...
    >
    > Last week I took a picture of a building early in the morning, the sun was
    > low but very bright. The brick wall of the building looked almost white.
    >
    > Today I took a picture of a wood framed house this morning and the house
    > looked almost white... the details were almost undetectable.
    >
    > I took other photos in telephoto of other than the outside walls of the
    > house and they were fine.
    >
    > Solution?


    Don't take pictures of bright walls!

    But seriously, post your pictures someplace and perhaps we can advise.
    Stewy, Mar 30, 2006
    #4
  5. jem bedacht in news:%IGWf.70$:

    > I am going to pick up the manuel as soon as I send this post...
    >
    > I am not very well versed in photography but I own a Fuji 9000. I
    > bought it becaue I thought it would automaticlly keep me from getting
    > into trouble....
    >
    > Last week I took a picture of a building early in the morning, the sun
    > was low but very bright. The brick wall of the building looked almost
    > white.
    >
    > Today I took a picture of a wood framed house this morning and the
    > house looked almost white... the details were almost undetectable.
    >
    > I took other photos in telephoto of other than the outside walls of
    > the house and they were fine.
    >
    > Solution?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > jem
    >
    >


    Or show us your EXIF files.

    JL
    Justus Lipsius, Mar 30, 2006
    #5
  6. jem

    Sel Guest

    jem wrote:
    > I am going to pick up the manuel as soon as I send this post...
    >
    > I am not very well versed in photography but I own a Fuji 9000. I bought it
    > becaue I thought it would automaticlly keep me from getting into trouble....
    >
    > Last week I took a picture of a building early in the morning, the sun was
    > low but very bright. The brick wall of the building looked almost white.
    >
    > Today I took a picture of a wood framed house this morning and the house
    > looked almost white... the details were almost undetectable.
    >
    > I took other photos in telephoto of other than the outside walls of the
    > house and they were fine.
    >
    > Solution?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >


    Jem. Use the average metering for bright buildings with high contrast
    and shadow areas, or spot meter the area you want to bring out.
    The s9x00 is more like a DSLr than a point and shoot in the way you use
    it. You must spend time with the manual and learning basic photography
    techniques. I find things I learned 50 years ago about photography are
    just as relevant today as they were then.
    Enjoy the camera, it is a joy to use.

    Sel ........ :)

    http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~selorme/photos.html
    Sel, Mar 31, 2006
    #6
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