Boot problem

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Jan Berden, Mar 1, 2010.

  1. Jan Berden

    Jan Berden Guest

    After installing and removing the program "Paragon Partition manager 10.0
    Personal" I got a hold-up in the PC upstart.

    In Dos booting I see now a black page with a text message lines: drive 0 :
    primary 00 Vista/2008/7 NTFS and primary 00 Linux.
    Insert startup disk in floppy drive and press F2 to run setup.

    By pressing "enter" Windows 7 Professional starts and runs further normally.

    Is there any suggestion to remove this startup page
     
    Jan Berden, Mar 1, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Jan Berden

    Jerry Guest

    Search for EasyBCD.exe and download and run it. You will be presented with
    options to edit/modify your boot conditions.

    "Jan Berden" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > After installing and removing the program "Paragon Partition manager 10.0
    > Personal" I got a hold-up in the PC upstart.
    >
    > In Dos booting I see now a black page with a text message lines: drive 0 :
    > primary 00 Vista/2008/7 NTFS and primary 00 Linux.
    > Insert startup disk in floppy drive and press F2 to run setup.
    >
    > By pressing "enter" Windows 7 Professional starts and runs further
    > normally.
    >
    > Is there any suggestion to remove this startup page
    >
    >
    >
     
    Jerry, Mar 1, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. The boot manager on your PC has some legacy changes made by the partition
    manager that need to be undone. The Windows command line tool for this is
    bcdedit, but it honestly has the worst user interface of anything I've seen
    from Microsoft since Edlin. There are a couple of graphical interfaces from
    third parties that make the whole thing a lot easier, and even a confirmed
    command line junky like me finds it simpler and safer to use one of these
    GUI wrappers. Dualbootpro and EasyBCD are two that I'm aware of.

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/russel




    "Jan Berden" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > After installing and removing the program "Paragon Partition manager 10.0
    > Personal" I got a hold-up in the PC upstart.
    >
    > In Dos booting I see now a black page with a text message lines: drive 0 :
    > primary 00 Vista/2008/7 NTFS and primary 00 Linux.
    > Insert startup disk in floppy drive and press F2 to run setup.
    >
    > By pressing "enter" Windows 7 Professional starts and runs further
    > normally.
    >
    > Is there any suggestion to remove this startup page
    >
    >
    >
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Mar 1, 2010
    #3
  4. Jan Berden

    Jan Berden Guest

    Thanks for the quick answer.
    EasyBCD did not find unusual entries. Mentioned was that only Windows7 was
    the existing entry.
    So I think there is running somewhere another command by the start up.
    The hold is not that boring ,Windows 7 will run finally.
    If there are more suggestions I shall be glad to hear of it
    I continue my search, maybe I install Windows later on again.


    "Jan Berden" <> schreef in bericht
    news:...
    > After installing and removing the program "Paragon Partition manager 10.0
    > Personal" I got a hold-up in the PC upstart.
    >
    > In Dos booting I see now a black page with a text message lines: drive 0 :
    > primary 00 Vista/2008/7 NTFS and primary 00 Linux.
    > Insert startup disk in floppy drive and press F2 to run setup.
    >
    > By pressing "enter" Windows 7 Professional starts and runs further
    > normally.
    >
    > Is there any suggestion to remove this startup page
     
    Jan Berden, Mar 2, 2010
    #4
  5. If you really want to fix the problem, do a clean install of your system
    and afterwards monitor the start-up and shutdown after installation of
    programs and drivers. You apparently have tried about everything else
    you can try.



    On 2010-03-02 14:23, Jan Berden wrote:
    > Thanks for the quick answer.
    > EasyBCD did not find unusual entries. Mentioned was that only Windows7
    > was the existing entry.
    > So I think there is running somewhere another command by the start up.
    > The hold is not that boring ,Windows 7 will run finally.
    > If there are more suggestions I shall be glad to hear of it
    > I continue my search, maybe I install Windows later on again.
    >
    >
    > "Jan Berden" <> schreef in bericht
    > news:...
    >> After installing and removing the program "Paragon Partition manager
    >> 10.0 Personal" I got a hold-up in the PC upstart.
    >>
    >> In Dos booting I see now a black page with a text message lines: drive
    >> 0 : primary 00 Vista/2008/7 NTFS and primary 00 Linux.
    >> Insert startup disk in floppy drive and press F2 to run setup.
    >>
    >> By pressing "enter" Windows 7 Professional starts and runs further
    >> normally.
    >>
    >> Is there any suggestion to remove this startup page

    >
    >
     
    Bobby Johnson, Mar 2, 2010
    #5
  6. "Jan Berden" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > After installing and removing the program "Paragon Partition manager 10.0
    > Personal" I got a hold-up in the PC upstart.
    >
    > In Dos booting I see now a black page with a text message lines: drive 0 :
    > primary 00 Vista/2008/7 NTFS and primary 00 Linux.
    > Insert startup disk in floppy drive and press F2 to run setup.
    >
    > By pressing "enter" Windows 7 Professional starts and runs further
    > normally.
    >
    > Is there any suggestion to remove this startup page



    <title>How to use the Bootrec.exe tool in the Windows Recovery Environment
    to troubleshoot and repair startup issues in Windows</title><
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/927392

    (Microsoft search for
    fixboot "Windows 7"
    )

    <quote>
    /FixBoot
    The /FixBoot option writes a new boot sector to the system partition by
    using a boot sector that is compatible with Windows Vista or Windows 7.

    Use this option if one of the following conditions is true:

    The boot sector has been replaced with a non-standard Windows Vista or
    Windows 7 boot sector.

    The boot sector is damaged.

    An earlier Windows operating system has been installed after Windows Vista
    or Windows 7 was installed. In this scenario, the computer starts by using
    Windows NT Loader (NTLDR) instead of Windows Boot Manager (Bootmgr.exe).

    </quote>


    Good luck

    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---
     
    Robert Aldwinckle, Mar 3, 2010
    #6
  7. Jan Berden

    John Barnes Guest

    You can try running startup repair from the install disk. Otherwise it
    would appear you have to rewrite your master boot record.

    "Jan Berden" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for the quick answer.
    > EasyBCD did not find unusual entries. Mentioned was that only Windows7 was
    > the existing entry.
    > So I think there is running somewhere another command by the start up.
    > The hold is not that boring ,Windows 7 will run finally.
    > If there are more suggestions I shall be glad to hear of it
    > I continue my search, maybe I install Windows later on again.
    >
    >
    > "Jan Berden" <> schreef in bericht
    > news:...
    >> After installing and removing the program "Paragon Partition manager 10.0
    >> Personal" I got a hold-up in the PC upstart.
    >>
    >> In Dos booting I see now a black page with a text message lines: drive 0
    >> : primary 00 Vista/2008/7 NTFS and primary 00 Linux.
    >> Insert startup disk in floppy drive and press F2 to run setup.
    >>
    >> By pressing "enter" Windows 7 Professional starts and runs further
    >> normally.
    >>
    >> Is there any suggestion to remove this startup page

    >
    >
     
    John Barnes, Mar 5, 2010
    #7
  8. Jan Berden

    Mark McGinty Guest

    "Jan Berden" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > After installing and removing the program "Paragon Partition manager 10.0
    > Personal" I got a hold-up in the PC upstart.
    >
    > In Dos booting I see now a black page with a text message lines: drive 0 :
    > primary 00 Vista/2008/7 NTFS and primary 00 Linux.
    > Insert startup disk in floppy drive and press F2 to run setup.
    >
    > By pressing "enter" Windows 7 Professional starts and runs further
    > normally.
    >
    > Is there any suggestion to remove this startup page
    >


    Is it possible both partitions were marked as active? Use DISKPART.EXE to
    view/change the active partition.


    -Mark
     
    Mark McGinty, Mar 9, 2010
    #8
  9. Mark McGinty wrote:
    > "Jan Berden" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> After installing and removing the program "Paragon Partition manager 10.0
    >> Personal" I got a hold-up in the PC upstart.
    >>
    >> In Dos booting I see now a black page with a text message lines: drive 0 :
    >> primary 00 Vista/2008/7 NTFS and primary 00 Linux.
    >> Insert startup disk in floppy drive and press F2 to run setup.
    >>
    >> By pressing "enter" Windows 7 Professional starts and runs further
    >> normally.
    >>
    >> Is there any suggestion to remove this startup page
    >>

    >
    > Is it possible both partitions were marked as active?


    That is impossible.


    Use DISKPART.EXE to
    > view/change the active partition.


    The boot manager changed the boot sector of the active partition and
    inserted its code in there. It is also possible that the boot manager
    would have changed the IPL code in the MBR and added its code in there,
    for example some Linux boot loaders load from the MBR instead of the
    boot sector of the active partition. Robert has pointed the OP in the
    right direction, but depending on the boot manager the OP may also need
    to use the /FixMbr command to rewrite the MBR.

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927392
    How to use the Bootrec.exe tool in the Windows Recovery Environment to
    troubleshoot and repair startup issues in Windows

    John
     
    John John - MVP, Mar 9, 2010
    #9
  10. Jan Berden

    Jeff Gaines Guest

    On 09/03/2010 in message <#> John John
    - MVP wrote:

    >>Is it possible both partitions were marked as active?

    >
    >That is impossible.


    Why do you say that?

    --
    Jeff Gaines Dorset UK
    Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his friends for his
    life.
    (Jeremy Thorpe, 1962)
     
    Jeff Gaines, Mar 9, 2010
    #10
  11. Jeff Gaines wrote:
    > On 09/03/2010 in message <#> John
    > John - MVP wrote:
    >
    >>> Is it possible both partitions were marked as active?

    >>
    >> That is impossible.

    >
    > Why do you say that?


    Because that is how it is, only one partition can be marked as active at
    any given time. If you mark another partition as active the active flag
    of the currently active partition will be removed. This is just the way
    things work on MBR disks, if there were more than one active partition
    the MBR IPL wouldn't know where to pass the boot process. When the
    computer is booted it goes something like this:

    1- The boot order is set in the BIOS and the BIOS selects the device to
    be booted, in this case the hard disk.

    2- The BIOS locates sector 0 on the hard disk and loads the MBR and then
    passes the boot process to the MBR.

    3- The MBR locates the Active partition and loads the Boot Sector of the
    active partition and then in turn passes the boot process to the boot
    sector.

    4- A bit of code is executed in the boot sector and this code finds and
    loads the designated boot loader, on NT systems it loads NTLDR and it
    then passes the boot process to the boot loader.

    In step #3 the MBR would be lost if there were to be more than one
    active partition so the flagging mechanism for the active partition
    doesn't allow this to happen, there can only be one active partition at
    any given time on the disk. You can move the active flag to another
    primary partition but you cannot flag more than one partition at a time.

    John
     
    John John - MVP, Mar 9, 2010
    #11
  12. Jan Berden

    Jeff Gaines Guest

    On 09/03/2010 in message <#> John John
    - MVP wrote:

    >Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>On 09/03/2010 in message <#> John
    >>John - MVP wrote:
    >>
    >>>>Is it possible both partitions were marked as active?
    >>>
    >>>That is impossible.

    >>
    >>Why do you say that?

    >
    >Because that is how it is, only one partition can be marked as active at
    >any given time. If you mark another partition as active the active flag
    >of the currently active partition will be removed. This is just the way
    >things work on MBR disks, if there were more than one active partition the
    >MBR IPL wouldn't know where to pass the boot process. When the computer
    >is booted it goes something like this:


    That may be true using FDISK but I have certainly ended up with a PC with
    more than one drive with an active partition. It may have been when I
    fitted a 2nd drive from another PC or when I was playing with Linux. It is
    much harder to get out of than to get into in the first place.

    --
    Jeff Gaines Dorset UK
    The facts, although interesting, are irrelevant
     
    Jeff Gaines, Mar 9, 2010
    #12
  13. Jeff Gaines wrote:
    > On 09/03/2010 in message <#> John
    > John - MVP wrote:
    >
    >> Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>> On 09/03/2010 in message <#>
    >>> John John - MVP wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> Is it possible both partitions were marked as active?
    >>>>
    >>>> That is impossible.
    >>>
    >>> Why do you say that?

    >>
    >> Because that is how it is, only one partition can be marked as active
    >> at any given time. If you mark another partition as active the active
    >> flag of the currently active partition will be removed. This is just
    >> the way things work on MBR disks, if there were more than one active
    >> partition the MBR IPL wouldn't know where to pass the boot process.
    >> When the computer is booted it goes something like this:

    >
    > That may be true using FDISK but I have certainly ended up with a PC
    > with more than one drive with an active partition. It may have been when
    > I fitted a 2nd drive from another PC or when I was playing with Linux.
    > It is much harder to get out of than to get into in the first place.


    If you have more than one hard disk then of course you can have more
    than one active partition as each disk can have an active partition.
    But a single disk can only have one active partition, if by some glitch
    (or by ill designed tools) more than one partition is set to be active
    the disk will not be able to boot.

    Is it possible that glitches or ill designed tools might set more than
    one active partition on the disk? None of the Microsoft tools do this,
    but certainly other poorly designed tools might be able to screw up a
    disk and software glitches can and do happen so it may be possible for
    this to happen but I have never personally seen this... or been able to
    inadvertently do it with any of the disk tools that I have worked with.

    Of course some boot managers install special boot partitions on the disk
    and then from this special partition they can create hundreds of pseudo
    primary partitions and possibly assign so called "active" status to any
    or all of these partitions but these are not standard MBR defined
    partitions, they are proprietary to the third party boot manager.

    John
     
    John John - MVP, Mar 9, 2010
    #13
  14. Jan Berden

    Tom Guest

    "John John - MVP" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >> On 09/03/2010 in message <#> John
    >> John - MVP wrote:
    >>
    >>> Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>>> On 09/03/2010 in message <#> John
    >>>> John - MVP wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>> Is it possible both partitions were marked as active?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That is impossible.
    >>>>
    >>>> Why do you say that?
    >>>
    >>> Because that is how it is, only one partition can be marked as active at
    >>> any given time. If you mark another partition as active the active flag
    >>> of the currently active partition will be removed. This is just the way
    >>> things work on MBR disks, if there were more than one active partition
    >>> the MBR IPL wouldn't know where to pass the boot process. When the
    >>> computer is booted it goes something like this:

    >>
    >> That may be true using FDISK but I have certainly ended up with a PC with
    >> more than one drive with an active partition. It may have been when I
    >> fitted a 2nd drive from another PC or when I was playing with Linux. It
    >> is much harder to get out of than to get into in the first place.

    >
    > If you have more than one hard disk then of course you can have more than
    > one active partition as each disk can have an active partition. But a
    > single disk can only have one active partition, if by some glitch (or by
    > ill designed tools) more than one partition is set to be active the disk
    > will not be able to boot.
    >
    > Is it possible that glitches or ill designed tools might set more than one
    > active partition on the disk? None of the Microsoft tools do this, but
    > certainly other poorly designed tools might be able to screw up a disk and
    > software glitches can and do happen so it may be possible for this to
    > happen but I have never personally seen this... or been able to
    > inadvertently do it with any of the disk tools that I have worked with.
    >
    > Of course some boot managers install special boot partitions on the disk
    > and then from this special partition they can create hundreds of pseudo
    > primary partitions and possibly assign so called "active" status to any or
    > all of these partitions but these are not standard MBR defined partitions,
    > they are proprietary to the third party boot manager.
    >
    > John


    Well, since you corrected yourself, it certainly is possible. You did say
    that it was impossible, when I know I have done this on one single disk by
    creating two primary partitions, instead of the usual creation of the
    logical/extended flavor.
     
    Tom, Mar 9, 2010
    #14
  15. Tom wrote:
    >
    >
    > "John John - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>> On 09/03/2010 in message <#> John
    >>> John - MVP wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>>>> On 09/03/2010 in message <#>
    >>>>> John John - MVP wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> Is it possible both partitions were marked as active?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> That is impossible.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Why do you say that?
    >>>>
    >>>> Because that is how it is, only one partition can be marked as
    >>>> active at any given time. If you mark another partition as active
    >>>> the active flag of the currently active partition will be removed.
    >>>> This is just the way things work on MBR disks, if there were more
    >>>> than one active partition the MBR IPL wouldn't know where to pass
    >>>> the boot process. When the computer is booted it goes something
    >>>> like this:
    >>>
    >>> That may be true using FDISK but I have certainly ended up with a PC
    >>> with more than one drive with an active partition. It may have been
    >>> when I fitted a 2nd drive from another PC or when I was playing with
    >>> Linux. It is much harder to get out of than to get into in the first
    >>> place.

    >>
    >> If you have more than one hard disk then of course you can have more
    >> than one active partition as each disk can have an active partition.
    >> But a single disk can only have one active partition, if by some
    >> glitch (or by ill designed tools) more than one partition is set to be
    >> active the disk will not be able to boot.
    >>
    >> Is it possible that glitches or ill designed tools might set more than
    >> one active partition on the disk? None of the Microsoft tools do
    >> this, but certainly other poorly designed tools might be able to screw
    >> up a disk and software glitches can and do happen so it may be
    >> possible for this to happen but I have never personally seen this...
    >> or been able to inadvertently do it with any of the disk tools that I
    >> have worked with.
    >>
    >> Of course some boot managers install special boot partitions on the
    >> disk and then from this special partition they can create hundreds of
    >> pseudo primary partitions and possibly assign so called "active"
    >> status to any or all of these partitions but these are not standard
    >> MBR defined partitions, they are proprietary to the third party boot
    >> manager.
    >>
    >> John

    >
    > Well, since you corrected yourself, it certainly is possible. You did
    > say that it was impossible, when I know I have done this on one single
    > disk by creating two primary partitions, instead of the usual creation
    > of the logical/extended flavor.


    We are not talking about "Primary Partitions", an MBR disk can have four
    primary partitions but only one of these primary partitions can be
    active at any given time. A primary partition is not necessarily an
    active partition. You can use the built-in Disk Management tool (or
    many other disk preparation tools) and create 4 primary partitions on
    the disk without any problems, making more than one of them active is
    another story altogether.

    John
     
    John John - MVP, Mar 9, 2010
    #15
  16. Jan Berden

    Tom Guest

    "John John - MVP" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Tom wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> "John John - MVP" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>>> On 09/03/2010 in message <#> John
    >>>> John - MVP wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>>>>> On 09/03/2010 in message <#> John
    >>>>>> John - MVP wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Is it possible both partitions were marked as active?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> That is impossible.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Why do you say that?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Because that is how it is, only one partition can be marked as active
    >>>>> at any given time. If you mark another partition as active the active
    >>>>> flag of the currently active partition will be removed. This is just
    >>>>> the way things work on MBR disks, if there were more than one active
    >>>>> partition the MBR IPL wouldn't know where to pass the boot process.
    >>>>> When the computer is booted it goes something like this:
    >>>>
    >>>> That may be true using FDISK but I have certainly ended up with a PC
    >>>> with more than one drive with an active partition. It may have been
    >>>> when I fitted a 2nd drive from another PC or when I was playing with
    >>>> Linux. It is much harder to get out of than to get into in the first
    >>>> place.
    >>>
    >>> If you have more than one hard disk then of course you can have more
    >>> than one active partition as each disk can have an active partition. But
    >>> a single disk can only have one active partition, if by some glitch (or
    >>> by ill designed tools) more than one partition is set to be active the
    >>> disk will not be able to boot.
    >>>
    >>> Is it possible that glitches or ill designed tools might set more than
    >>> one active partition on the disk? None of the Microsoft tools do this,
    >>> but certainly other poorly designed tools might be able to screw up a
    >>> disk and software glitches can and do happen so it may be possible for
    >>> this to happen but I have never personally seen this... or been able to
    >>> inadvertently do it with any of the disk tools that I have worked with.
    >>>
    >>> Of course some boot managers install special boot partitions on the disk
    >>> and then from this special partition they can create hundreds of pseudo
    >>> primary partitions and possibly assign so called "active" status to any
    >>> or all of these partitions but these are not standard MBR defined
    >>> partitions, they are proprietary to the third party boot manager.
    >>>
    >>> John

    >>
    >> Well, since you corrected yourself, it certainly is possible. You did say
    >> that it was impossible, when I know I have done this on one single disk
    >> by creating two primary partitions, instead of the usual creation of the
    >> logical/extended flavor.

    >
    > We are not talking about "Primary Partitions", an MBR disk can have four
    > primary partitions but only one of these primary partitions can be active
    > at any given time. A primary partition is not necessarily an active
    > partition. You can use the built-in Disk Management tool (or many other
    > disk preparation tools) and create 4 primary partitions on the disk
    > without any problems, making more than one of them active is another story
    > altogether.
    >


    I am not disputing that and you can describe this as you see fit on how it
    works, I know (I build PCs). You stated it was impossible, but no matter, it
    is possible. I also know they would be primary partitions (did I not say
    that?), but you at least corrected yourself. I wasn't getting into the nut
    and bolts of how to do it, just that you stated it was "impossible".
     
    Tom, Mar 10, 2010
    #16
  17. Tom wrote:
    >
    >
    > "John John - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Tom wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "John John - MVP" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>>>> On 09/03/2010 in message <#>
    >>>>> John John - MVP wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>>>>>> On 09/03/2010 in message <#>
    >>>>>>> John John - MVP wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Is it possible both partitions were marked as active?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> That is impossible.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Why do you say that?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Because that is how it is, only one partition can be marked as
    >>>>>> active at any given time. If you mark another partition as active
    >>>>>> the active flag of the currently active partition will be
    >>>>>> removed. This is just the way things work on MBR disks, if there
    >>>>>> were more than one active partition the MBR IPL wouldn't know
    >>>>>> where to pass the boot process. When the computer is booted it
    >>>>>> goes something like this:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That may be true using FDISK but I have certainly ended up with a
    >>>>> PC with more than one drive with an active partition. It may have
    >>>>> been when I fitted a 2nd drive from another PC or when I was
    >>>>> playing with Linux. It is much harder to get out of than to get
    >>>>> into in the first place.
    >>>>
    >>>> If you have more than one hard disk then of course you can have more
    >>>> than one active partition as each disk can have an active partition.
    >>>> But a single disk can only have one active partition, if by some
    >>>> glitch (or by ill designed tools) more than one partition is set to
    >>>> be active the disk will not be able to boot.
    >>>>
    >>>> Is it possible that glitches or ill designed tools might set more
    >>>> than one active partition on the disk? None of the Microsoft tools
    >>>> do this, but certainly other poorly designed tools might be able to
    >>>> screw up a disk and software glitches can and do happen so it may be
    >>>> possible for this to happen but I have never personally seen this...
    >>>> or been able to inadvertently do it with any of the disk tools that
    >>>> I have worked with.
    >>>>
    >>>> Of course some boot managers install special boot partitions on the
    >>>> disk and then from this special partition they can create hundreds
    >>>> of pseudo primary partitions and possibly assign so called "active"
    >>>> status to any or all of these partitions but these are not standard
    >>>> MBR defined partitions, they are proprietary to the third party boot
    >>>> manager.
    >>>>
    >>>> John
    >>>
    >>> Well, since you corrected yourself, it certainly is possible. You did
    >>> say that it was impossible, when I know I have done this on one
    >>> single disk by creating two primary partitions, instead of the usual
    >>> creation of the logical/extended flavor.

    >>
    >> We are not talking about "Primary Partitions", an MBR disk can have
    >> four primary partitions but only one of these primary partitions can
    >> be active at any given time. A primary partition is not necessarily
    >> an active partition. You can use the built-in Disk Management tool
    >> (or many other disk preparation tools) and create 4 primary partitions
    >> on the disk without any problems, making more than one of them active
    >> is another story altogether.
    >>

    >
    > I am not disputing that and you can describe this as you see fit on how
    > it works, I know (I build PCs). You stated it was impossible, but no
    > matter, it is possible. I also know they would be primary partitions
    > (did I not say that?), but you at least corrected yourself. I wasn't
    > getting into the nut and bolts of how to do it, just that you stated it
    > was "impossible".


    If you know how to flag more than one partition active at the same time
    then tell us how you do it! You are confusing primary partitions with
    active partitions. The plain and simple fact of the matter is that an
    MBR disk cannot have more than one active partition at a given time, you
    can toggle the active partition back and forth between primary
    partitions but only one partition can be set active, that is the way it
    is was designed by IBM years ago and that is the way it is still today.
    If you do end up with more than one active partition then the disk is
    corrupt and you will get an invalid partition table error message when
    you try to boot the disk.

    John
     
    John John - MVP, Mar 10, 2010
    #17
  18. Tom wrote:
    >
    >
    > "John John - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Tom wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "John John - MVP" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>>>> On 09/03/2010 in message <#>
    >>>>> John John - MVP wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Jeff Gaines wrote:
    >>>>>>> On 09/03/2010 in message <#>
    >>>>>>> John John - MVP wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Is it possible both partitions were marked as active?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> That is impossible.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Why do you say that?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Because that is how it is, only one partition can be marked as
    >>>>>> active at any given time. If you mark another partition as active
    >>>>>> the active flag of the currently active partition will be
    >>>>>> removed. This is just the way things work on MBR disks, if there
    >>>>>> were more than one active partition the MBR IPL wouldn't know
    >>>>>> where to pass the boot process. When the computer is booted it
    >>>>>> goes something like this:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That may be true using FDISK but I have certainly ended up with a
    >>>>> PC with more than one drive with an active partition. It may have
    >>>>> been when I fitted a 2nd drive from another PC or when I was
    >>>>> playing with Linux. It is much harder to get out of than to get
    >>>>> into in the first place.
    >>>>
    >>>> If you have more than one hard disk then of course you can have more
    >>>> than one active partition as each disk can have an active partition.
    >>>> But a single disk can only have one active partition, if by some
    >>>> glitch (or by ill designed tools) more than one partition is set to
    >>>> be active the disk will not be able to boot.
    >>>>
    >>>> Is it possible that glitches or ill designed tools might set more
    >>>> than one active partition on the disk? None of the Microsoft tools
    >>>> do this, but certainly other poorly designed tools might be able to
    >>>> screw up a disk and software glitches can and do happen so it may be
    >>>> possible for this to happen but I have never personally seen this...
    >>>> or been able to inadvertently do it with any of the disk tools that
    >>>> I have worked with.
    >>>>
    >>>> Of course some boot managers install special boot partitions on the
    >>>> disk and then from this special partition they can create hundreds
    >>>> of pseudo primary partitions and possibly assign so called "active"
    >>>> status to any or all of these partitions but these are not standard
    >>>> MBR defined partitions, they are proprietary to the third party boot
    >>>> manager.
    >>>>
    >>>> John
    >>>
    >>> Well, since you corrected yourself, it certainly is possible. You did
    >>> say that it was impossible, when I know I have done this on one
    >>> single disk by creating two primary partitions, instead of the usual
    >>> creation of the logical/extended flavor.

    >>
    >> We are not talking about "Primary Partitions", an MBR disk can have
    >> four primary partitions but only one of these primary partitions can
    >> be active at any given time. A primary partition is not necessarily
    >> an active partition. You can use the built-in Disk Management tool
    >> (or many other disk preparation tools) and create 4 primary partitions
    >> on the disk without any problems, making more than one of them active
    >> is another story altogether.
    >>

    >
    > I am not disputing that and you can describe this as you see fit on how
    > it works, I know (I build PCs). You stated it was impossible, but no
    > matter, it is possible. I also know they would be primary partitions
    > (did I not say that?), but you at least corrected yourself. I wasn't
    > getting into the nut and bolts of how to do it, just that you stated it
    > was "impossible".


    http://www.linfo.org/active_partition.html
    Active partition definition by The Linux Information Project (LINFO)

    http://partitionlogic.org.uk/manual/partition-ops/active.html
    Partition Logic - User Manual - Active Partition

    http://blog.easeus.com/basic-guide/How-to-Set-an-Active-Partition-182.html
    How to Set an Active Partition? - EASEUS Data Recovery Blog

    http://www.computerhope.com/jargon/a/activepa.htm
    Active partition

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc779300(WS.10).aspx
    Mark a partition as active (32-bit only): Storage Services; Local File
    Systems

    http://www.partitionwizard.com/help/set-active.html
    Set Active/Inactive - Partition Wizard Help

    Are these authoritative enough for you?
     
    John John - MVP, Mar 10, 2010
    #18
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