Blockbuster vs. Netflix

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by root, Dec 2, 2006.

  1. root

    root Guest

    I recently finished free trials of both Neflix and Blockbuster video
    rental services. I live in the greater Los Angeles area, about 20
    miles from the Blockbuster center, forty miles from the Netflix site.
    The local Blockbuster rental store is within easy walking distance.
    The Netflix trial was for four weeks, the Blockbuster for two.

    Based upon this experience the Blockbuster service was in every
    way superior to that of Netflix. Netflix does not process orders
    on weekends or holidays, Blockbuster seems to work 24/7. Netflix
    requires two-way mail service for every disk, you can return
    your disks to your local Blockbuster store, have the disks scanned
    in, and the Blockbuster center will ship your next entry.

    As an example, I returned a disk to my local Blockbuster store
    on Thanksgiving day; the Blockbuster center received notice
    and shipped out a replacement that day; I received the replacement
    on the day after Thanksgiving.

    Upon returning a disk to the local Blockbuster you can take out
    a free rental for any disk in the store. Following on my
    Thanksgiving experience above, after I returned the disk I was
    able to take out another immediately. There is no way that Netflix
    can match that.

    If you are interested in video rental by mail I encourage you to
    take advantage of the Blockbuster free trial.
     
    root, Dec 2, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. root

    Bill's News Guest

    root wrote:
    > I recently finished free trials of both Neflix and Blockbuster
    > video
    > rental services. I live in the greater Los Angeles area, about
    > 20
    > miles from the Blockbuster center, forty miles from the
    > Netflix site.
    > The local Blockbuster rental store is within easy walking
    > distance.
    > The Netflix trial was for four weeks, the Blockbuster for two.
    >
    > Based upon this experience the Blockbuster service was in
    > every
    > way superior to that of Netflix. Netflix does not process
    > orders
    > on weekends or holidays, Blockbuster seems to work 24/7.
    > Netflix
    > requires two-way mail service for every disk, you can return
    > your disks to your local Blockbuster store, have the disks
    > scanned
    > in, and the Blockbuster center will ship your next entry.
    >
    > As an example, I returned a disk to my local Blockbuster store
    > on Thanksgiving day; the Blockbuster center received notice
    > and shipped out a replacement that day; I received the
    > replacement
    > on the day after Thanksgiving.
    >
    > Upon returning a disk to the local Blockbuster you can take
    > out
    > a free rental for any disk in the store. Following on my
    > Thanksgiving experience above, after I returned the disk I was
    > able to take out another immediately. There is no way that
    > Netflix
    > can match that.
    >
    > If you are interested in video rental by mail I encourage you
    > to
    > take advantage of the Blockbuster free trial.


    This is a very nice presentation of your argument favoring BB.
    Some points to consider and not necessarily to contravene your
    positives:

    1) I'm about 40 miles south of L.A. in the greater megalopolis.
    Nearest BB store is 5 miles and there are three of them in about
    the same radius. None happens to be adjacent to anywhere else I
    might shop, so visiting them would be the sole purpose of a trip
    there.

    2) The principal reason that I stopped in-store rentals with BB
    was that the lengthened return policy (forced by Netflix's lower
    cost strategy) caused much of the disc rental shelf space to be
    empty much of the time AND that the older items had always
    tended to stagnate, so that there was little of interest to be
    found in the store after several years as a customer.

    3) A perusal of what Netflix had available for rental when
    compared with the "shopping" list I kept, the content of which I
    never found in a BB store, left me no option but to switch -
    Netflix had what I wanted.

    4) Time has passed and BB has had more than enough time to work
    out a competitive strategy - and you've done a nice job of
    highlighting what it is, for those who - like yourself - live
    within walking distance of a store located not too far from an
    on-line-rental distribution center.

    5) Every once in a while a BB promotion entices me back into any
    of the nearby stores. Nothing has changed: the wall is
    virtually empty; the same "old" films I'd seen too often a few
    years back are still on the floor.

    I've not visited BB's on-line-rental web site for quite a while,
    so I will not attempt to make a comparison between it and
    Netflix. However, in a few years now as a Netflix customer they
    have done nothing wrong in amply fulfilling my video rental
    needs - and, I've never needed to go anywhere by foot or by car
    to enhance my experience with them.
     
    Bill's News, Dec 2, 2006
    #2
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  3. root

    dgates Guest

    On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 10:22:05 GMT, root <> wrote:

    >I recently finished free trials of both Neflix and Blockbuster video
    >rental services. I live in the greater Los Angeles area, about 20
    >miles from the Blockbuster center, forty miles from the Netflix site.
    >The local Blockbuster rental store is within easy walking distance.
    >The Netflix trial was for four weeks, the Blockbuster for two.
    >
    >Based upon this experience the Blockbuster service was in every
    >way superior to that of Netflix. Netflix does not process orders
    >on weekends or holidays, Blockbuster seems to work 24/7. Netflix
    >requires two-way mail service for every disk, you can return
    >your disks to your local Blockbuster store, have the disks scanned
    >in, and the Blockbuster center will ship your next entry.
    >
    >As an example, I returned a disk to my local Blockbuster store
    >on Thanksgiving day; the Blockbuster center received notice
    >and shipped out a replacement that day; I received the replacement
    >on the day after Thanksgiving.
    >
    >Upon returning a disk to the local Blockbuster you can take out
    >a free rental for any disk in the store. Following on my
    >Thanksgiving experience above, after I returned the disk I was
    >able to take out another immediately. There is no way that Netflix
    >can match that.
    >
    >If you are interested in video rental by mail I encourage you to
    >take advantage of the Blockbuster free trial.



    Based on your description, if Blockbuster offered the exact same
    selection as NetFlix (and the monthly plan cost about the same), I
    would be very inclined to switch.

    How's the selection at Blockbuster? I just hit their site, as a
    non-member, and searched for a couple of the more obscure movies on my
    Netflix queue:

    Cats (1998)
    Battle Beyond the Stars (1980)
    Soylent Green
    David Bowie: A Reality Tour
    The Cat O' Nine Tails (1971)
    Schizopolis

    I got search results for every single one of these, but I can't tell
    if that means that, as a monthly member, those movies would be
    available to me. (Sometimes, for search results, a site will just
    show any movie in its DB, even if it doesn't actually have the movie
    available.)

    I got search results for the "Pinky Violence Collection," but it's for
    the purchase of a boxed set. I didn't see any sign that I'd be able
    to rent, say, "Pinky Violence Collection: Criminal Woman." (Is "rent"
    the right word to use when you're dealing with Blockbuster's monthly
    plan?)

    Anyway, how's the actual rental selection for Blockbuster online
    members?
     
    dgates, Dec 2, 2006
    #3
  4. root

    Phisherman Guest

    On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 10:22:05 GMT, root <> wrote:

    >I recently finished free trials of both Neflix and Blockbuster video
    >rental services. I live in the greater Los Angeles area, about 20
    >miles from the Blockbuster center, forty miles from the Netflix site.
    >The local Blockbuster rental store is within easy walking distance.
    >The Netflix trial was for four weeks, the Blockbuster for two.
    >
    >Based upon this experience the Blockbuster service was in every
    >way superior to that of Netflix. Netflix does not process orders
    >on weekends or holidays, Blockbuster seems to work 24/7. Netflix
    >requires two-way mail service for every disk, you can return
    >your disks to your local Blockbuster store, have the disks scanned
    >in, and the Blockbuster center will ship your next entry.
    >
    >As an example, I returned a disk to my local Blockbuster store
    >on Thanksgiving day; the Blockbuster center received notice
    >and shipped out a replacement that day; I received the replacement
    >on the day after Thanksgiving.
    >
    >Upon returning a disk to the local Blockbuster you can take out
    >a free rental for any disk in the store. Following on my
    >Thanksgiving experience above, after I returned the disk I was
    >able to take out another immediately. There is no way that Netflix
    >can match that.
    >
    >If you are interested in video rental by mail I encourage you to
    >take advantage of the Blockbuster free trial.



    Either service can be good or poor depending on whatever. I dumped
    both Netflix and Blockbuster and now use the local Hollywood video--3
    rentals for $9.99 a month. And you can exchange as many as you wish
    as often as you wish.
     
    Phisherman, Dec 2, 2006
    #4
  5. root

    Mac Cool Guest

    Phisherman:

    > 3 rentals for $9.99 a month. And you can exchange as many as you
    > wish as often as you wish.


    What does that mean, to exchange a rental?

    --
    Mac Cool
     
    Mac Cool, Dec 4, 2006
    #5
  6. Mac Cool wrote:

    > Phisherman:
    >
    >
    >>3 rentals for $9.99 a month. And you can exchange as many as you
    >>wish as often as you wish.

    >
    >
    > What does that mean, to exchange a rental?


    Well, if it were Netflix, it would mean "3 rentals out at a time", and
    unlimited exchanges all month--

    But, since Blockbuster's copying the wording without quite understanding
    the essence, we're not really sure.

    Derek Janssen
     
    Derek Janssen, Dec 4, 2006
    #6
  7. root

    Dan P. Guest

    "root" <> wrote in message
    news:htcch.114$...
    >I recently finished free trials of both Neflix and Blockbuster video
    > rental services. I live in the greater Los Angeles area, about 20
    > miles from the Blockbuster center, forty miles from the Netflix site.
    > The local Blockbuster rental store is within easy walking distance.
    > The Netflix trial was for four weeks, the Blockbuster for two.
    >
    > Based upon this experience the Blockbuster service was in every
    > way superior to that of Netflix. Netflix does not process orders
    > on weekends or holidays, Blockbuster seems to work 24/7. Netflix
    > requires two-way mail service for every disk, you can return
    > your disks to your local Blockbuster store, have the disks scanned
    > in, and the Blockbuster center will ship your next entry.
    >
    > As an example, I returned a disk to my local Blockbuster store
    > on Thanksgiving day; the Blockbuster center received notice
    > and shipped out a replacement that day; I received the replacement
    > on the day after Thanksgiving.
    >
    > Upon returning a disk to the local Blockbuster you can take out
    > a free rental for any disk in the store. Following on my
    > Thanksgiving experience above, after I returned the disk I was
    > able to take out another immediately. There is no way that Netflix
    > can match that.
    >
    > If you are interested in video rental by mail I encourage you to
    > take advantage of the Blockbuster free trial.


    One of the main reasons I use a home-delivery service is for the convenience
    of being able to return movies by simply placing the envelopes back into my
    mailbox. So being able to return movies to a local BB is not desirable.
     
    Dan P., Dec 4, 2006
    #7
  8. root

    funkifized Guest

    Dan P. wrote:
    > "root" <> wrote in message
    > news:htcch.114$...
    > >I recently finished free trials of both Neflix and Blockbuster video
    > > rental services. I live in the greater Los Angeles area, about 20
    > > miles from the Blockbuster center, forty miles from the Netflix site.
    > > The local Blockbuster rental store is within easy walking distance.
    > > The Netflix trial was for four weeks, the Blockbuster for two.
    > >
    > > Based upon this experience the Blockbuster service was in every
    > > way superior to that of Netflix. Netflix does not process orders
    > > on weekends or holidays, Blockbuster seems to work 24/7. Netflix
    > > requires two-way mail service for every disk, you can return
    > > your disks to your local Blockbuster store, have the disks scanned
    > > in, and the Blockbuster center will ship your next entry.
    > >
    > > As an example, I returned a disk to my local Blockbuster store
    > > on Thanksgiving day; the Blockbuster center received notice
    > > and shipped out a replacement that day; I received the replacement
    > > on the day after Thanksgiving.
    > >
    > > Upon returning a disk to the local Blockbuster you can take out
    > > a free rental for any disk in the store. Following on my
    > > Thanksgiving experience above, after I returned the disk I was
    > > able to take out another immediately. There is no way that Netflix
    > > can match that.
    > >
    > > If you are interested in video rental by mail I encourage you to
    > > take advantage of the Blockbuster free trial.

    >
    > One of the main reasons I use a home-delivery service is for the convenience
    > of being able to return movies by simply placing the envelopes back into my
    > mailbox. So being able to return movies to a local BB is not desirable.


    Yeah, no kidding. If I want to go to Blockbuster, I'd go to
    Blockbuster. The free trial works for me, as I can return to the store
    and get twice as many discs for the trial month. However many of them
    aren't copy protected can certainly be watched later. However, I'm
    heading back to Netflix as soon as the month is up.
     
    funkifized, Dec 4, 2006
    #8
  9. root

    root Guest

    Dan P. <> wrote:
    >
    > One of the main reasons I use a home-delivery service is for the convenience
    > of being able to return movies by simply placing the envelopes back into my
    > mailbox. So being able to return movies to a local BB is not desirable.
    >
    >


    Of course you have that option with Blockbuster, but then BB has no advantage
    over Netflix.
     
    root, Dec 4, 2006
    #9
  10. root

    AZ Nomad Guest

    On 4 Dec 2006 01:37:35 GMT, Mac Cool <> wrote:


    >Phisherman:


    >> 3 rentals for $9.99 a month. And you can exchange as many as you
    >> wish as often as you wish.


    >What does that mean, to exchange a rental?


    which word don't you understand?
     
    AZ Nomad, Dec 4, 2006
    #10
  11. root

    Citizen Bob Guest

    On Mon, 04 Dec 2006 03:37:34 GMT, "Dan P." <> wrote:

    >One of the main reasons I use a home-delivery service is for the convenience
    >of being able to return movies by simply placing the envelopes back into my
    >mailbox. So being able to return movies to a local BB is not desirable.


    There is no assurance that the local BB store even has any DVDs you
    want.


    --

    "Yet the legislative being only a fiduciary power to act for certain
    ends, there remains still in the people a supreme power to remove or
    alter the legislative, when they find the legislative act contrary to
    the trust reposed in them....And thus the community perpetually retains
    a supreme power of saving themselves from the attempts and designs of
    any body, even of their legislators, whenever they shall be so foolish
    or so wicked as to lay and carry on designs against the liberties and
    properties of the subject."
    --John Locke
     
    Citizen Bob, Dec 4, 2006
    #11
  12. root

    Citizen Bob Guest

    On Mon, 04 Dec 2006 09:30:26 GMT, root <> wrote:

    >Of course you have that option with Blockbuster, but then BB has no advantage
    >over Netflix.


    My experience has been that Netflix usually delivers your top requests
    whereas BB doesn't. I have had BB skip several top entries to send a
    request that is down in the queue.

    Plus that, BB does not have as large a selection as Netflix. For
    example, NF has had Battlestar Galactica Season 2.5 available for a
    while (released September 19, 2006 according to amazon.com) whereas BB
    doesn't even show it online - they only show Season 2.0 which has been
    out for ages.


    --

    "Yet the legislative being only a fiduciary power to act for certain
    ends, there remains still in the people a supreme power to remove or
    alter the legislative, when they find the legislative act contrary to
    the trust reposed in them....And thus the community perpetually retains
    a supreme power of saving themselves from the attempts and designs of
    any body, even of their legislators, whenever they shall be so foolish
    or so wicked as to lay and carry on designs against the liberties and
    properties of the subject."
    --John Locke
     
    Citizen Bob, Dec 4, 2006
    #12
  13. root

    TH Guest

    root wrote:
    > I recently finished free trials of both Neflix and Blockbuster video
    > rental services. I live in the greater Los Angeles area, about 20
    > miles from the Blockbuster center, forty miles from the Netflix site.
    > The local Blockbuster rental store is within easy walking distance.
    > The Netflix trial was for four weeks, the Blockbuster for two.
    >
    > Based upon this experience the Blockbuster service was in every
    > way superior to that of Netflix.


    Well I've been trying the BB service for a few days now and so far I
    see no evidence they work 24/7 or on weekends. I also live in Los
    Angeles. Two of my first two disks took two days to get here and one
    took three. I returned one on Saturday and it still hasn't shown up on
    my queue as returned. Granted I've only had the service barely a week
    so far, but I'm not impressed in any way so far. (at least during the
    Netflix's non-throttling periods, disks would be sent one day, show up
    the next)

    I tried the service for a month last year and it was awful. Besides not
    sending out movies for a week at a time (they say because I only had 14
    movies in my queue instead of 30 despite the fact all were 'available
    now'), they were sending movies out of order, rather than in my order.

    I desperately am looking for an alternative to Netflix (and their
    throttling practices) so I hope BB ends up working out and I will give
    them every chance to impress me.
     
    TH, Dec 4, 2006
    #13
  14. In article <>,
    (Citizen Bob) wrote:

    > On Mon, 04 Dec 2006 09:30:26 GMT, root <> wrote:
    >
    > >Of course you have that option with Blockbuster, but then BB has no advantage
    > >over Netflix.

    >
    > My experience has been that Netflix usually delivers your top requests
    > whereas BB doesn't. I have had BB skip several top entries to send a
    > request that is down in the queue.
    >
    > Plus that, BB does not have as large a selection as Netflix. For
    > example, NF has had Battlestar Galactica Season 2.5 available for a
    > while (released September 19, 2006 according to amazon.com) whereas BB
    > doesn't even show it online - they only show Season 2.0 which has been
    > out for ages.
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > "Yet the legislative being only a fiduciary power to act for certain
    > ends, there remains still in the people a supreme power to remove or
    > alter the legislative, when they find the legislative act contrary to
    > the trust reposed in them....And thus the community perpetually retains
    > a supreme power of saving themselves from the attempts and designs of
    > any body, even of their legislators, whenever they shall be so foolish
    > or so wicked as to lay and carry on designs against the liberties and
    > properties of the subject."
    > --John Locke


    Netflix is dandy for most folks with reasonable viewing habits - amazing
    selection and prompt service other than temporary bottlenecks for popular new
    releases. The folks who complain the most seem to be those who want some
    maximized ideal of throughput so that they can copy as many titles as possible
    to build a library (they can't possibly watch that many flicks, if they have a
    job and/or a life). They don't want to pay for more than the 3-out "unlimited"
    plan, and look forward to the on-demand download model, but will be disappointed
    when that has (as it must) an even more rigid "throttling" or pay-per-download
    scheme.

    --
     
    Haddatten Huttendrut, Dec 5, 2006
    #14
  15. root

    TH Guest

    Haddatten Huttendrut wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > >

    > Netflix is dandy for most folks with reasonable viewing habits - amazing
    > selection and prompt service other than temporary bottlenecks for popular new
    > releases. The folks who complain the most seem to be those who want some
    > maximized ideal of throughput so that they can copy as many titles as possible
    > to build a library (they can't possibly watch that many flicks, if they have a
    > job and/or a life). They don't want to pay for more than the 3-out "unlimited"
    > plan, and look forward to the on-demand download model, but will be disappointed
    > when that has (as it must) an even more rigid "throttling" or pay-per-download
    > scheme.
    >
    > --


    I always find it odd that people find fault when someone says Netflix
    throttles them. Whether you think someone should only be allowed a
    certain number of disks a month or not is moot. The fact is Netflix
    claims you can have as many disks as you want, meaning if you turn it
    over the next day, another shouldl be sent right out, not "you can get
    as many as you want unless we deem it's too many, then we'll hold back
    some." If somoene turns over their disks the next day, they have the
    right to have the next disk in their queue sent out with the same speed
    as anyone else. OR, Netflix can simply change their motto to "as many
    disks as we think is fair to us." The fact you have decided what is a
    "reasonable viewing habit" shows you think your opinion is the one
    everyone should adhere to and that's that. After all, you've decided
    what is a "reasonable viewing habit."
     
    TH, Dec 5, 2006
    #15
  16. TH wrote:

    > Haddatten Huttendrut wrote:
    >> >

    >>Netflix is dandy for most folks with reasonable viewing habits - amazing
    >>selection and prompt service other than temporary bottlenecks for popular new
    >>releases. The folks who complain the most seem to be those who want some
    >>maximized ideal of throughput so that they can copy as many titles as possible
    >>to build a library (they can't possibly watch that many flicks, if they have a
    >>job and/or a life). They don't want to pay for more than the 3-out "unlimited"
    >>plan, and look forward to the on-demand download model, but will be disappointed
    >>when that has (as it must) an even more rigid "throttling" or pay-per-download
    >>scheme.

    >
    > I always find it odd that people find fault when someone says Netflix
    > throttles them. Whether you think someone should only be allowed a
    > certain number of disks a month or not is moot. The fact is Netflix
    > claims you can have as many disks as you want, meaning if you turn it
    > over the next day, another shouldl be sent right out, not "you can get
    > as many as you want unless we deem it's too many, then we'll hold back
    > some." If somoene turns over their disks the next day, they have the
    > right to have the next disk in their queue sent out with the same speed
    > as anyone else. OR, Netflix can simply change their motto to "as many
    > disks as we think is fair to us." The fact you have decided what is a
    > "reasonable viewing habit" shows you think your opinion is the one
    > everyone should adhere to and that's that. After all, you've decided
    > what is a "reasonable viewing habit."


    ....Maybe you're not the person to decide that?

    Derek Janssen (heeeeere we go again: "In Defense of Video Gluttony")
     
    Derek Janssen, Dec 5, 2006
    #16
  17. root

    Guest

    Blockbuster Total Access is a much better service than Netflix, here is
    a holiday deal with 4 week free. Happy holidays !

    Blockbuster Total Access - 4 Weeks Free - Promotion Code : 1969ta

    Visit web at http://www.blockbuster.com/bbfamily and enter promo code
    "1969ta"

    root wrote:
    > I recently finished free trials of both Neflix and Blockbuster video
    > rental services. I live in the greater Los Angeles area, about 20
    > miles from the Blockbuster center, forty miles from the Netflix site.
    > The local Blockbuster rental store is within easy walking distance.
    > The Netflix trial was for four weeks, the Blockbuster for two.
    >
    > Based upon this experience the Blockbuster service was in every
    > way superior to that of Netflix. Netflix does not process orders
    > on weekends or holidays, Blockbuster seems to work 24/7. Netflix
    > requires two-way mail service for every disk, you can return
    > your disks to your local Blockbuster store, have the disks scanned
    > in, and the Blockbuster center will ship your next entry.
    >
    > As an example, I returned a disk to my local Blockbuster store
    > on Thanksgiving day; the Blockbuster center received notice
    > and shipped out a replacement that day; I received the replacement
    > on the day after Thanksgiving.
    >
    > Upon returning a disk to the local Blockbuster you can take out
    > a free rental for any disk in the store. Following on my
    > Thanksgiving experience above, after I returned the disk I was
    > able to take out another immediately. There is no way that Netflix
    > can match that.
    >
    > If you are interested in video rental by mail I encourage you to
    > take advantage of the Blockbuster free trial.
     
    , Dec 5, 2006
    #17
  18. In article <>,
    "TH" <> wrote:

    > Haddatten Huttendrut wrote:
    > > In article <>,
    > > >

    > > Netflix is dandy for most folks with reasonable viewing habits - amazing
    > > selection and prompt service other than temporary bottlenecks for popular
    > > new
    > > releases. The folks who complain the most seem to be those who want some
    > > maximized ideal of throughput so that they can copy as many titles as
    > > possible
    > > to build a library (they can't possibly watch that many flicks, if they
    > > have a
    > > job and/or a life). They don't want to pay for more than the 3-out
    > > "unlimited"
    > > plan, and look forward to the on-demand download model, but will be
    > > disappointed
    > > when that has (as it must) an even more rigid "throttling" or
    > > pay-per-download
    > > scheme.
    > >
    > > --

    >
    > I always find it odd that people find fault when someone says Netflix
    > throttles them. Whether you think someone should only be allowed a
    > certain number of disks a month or not is moot. The fact is Netflix
    > claims you can have as many disks as you want, meaning if you turn it
    > over the next day, another shouldl be sent right out, not "you can get
    > as many as you want unless we deem it's too many, then we'll hold back
    > some." If somoene turns over their disks the next day, they have the
    > right to have the next disk in their queue sent out with the same speed
    > as anyone else. OR, Netflix can simply change their motto to "as many
    > disks as we think is fair to us." The fact you have decided what is a
    > "reasonable viewing habit" shows you think your opinion is the one
    > everyone should adhere to and that's that. After all, you've decided
    > what is a "reasonable viewing habit."


    It's really simple. "Unlimited" is exactly that for folks with normal
    renting/viewing habits, and allows for the odd spikes of a flick or more per day
    (within the limits of postal service). What's "reasonable" is what allows the
    company to make a profit while serving most customers - without that, there'd be
    no company, service, selection, etc. If you aren't getting your desired number
    of discs per month, try the 8-out plan, or see if you can do better with a
    competitor.

    Maybe Netflix should change their advertising, but it doesn't seem to be a
    problem for any but a few determined to push it to the limit.

    --
     
    Haddatten Huttendrut, Dec 5, 2006
    #18
  19. Haddatten Huttendrut wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > "TH" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Haddatten Huttendrut wrote:
    >>
    >>>In article <>,
    >>> >
    >>>Netflix is dandy for most folks with reasonable viewing habits - amazing
    >>>selection and prompt service other than temporary bottlenecks for popular
    >>>new
    >>>releases. The folks who complain the most seem to be those who want some
    >>>maximized ideal of throughput so that they can copy as many titles as
    >>>possible
    >>>to build a library (they can't possibly watch that many flicks, if they
    >>>have a
    >>>job and/or a life). They don't want to pay for more than the 3-out
    >>>"unlimited"
    >>>plan, and look forward to the on-demand download model, but will be
    >>>disappointed
    >>>when that has (as it must) an even more rigid "throttling" or
    >>>pay-per-download
    >>>scheme.
    >>>
    >>>--

    >>
    >>I always find it odd that people find fault when someone says Netflix
    >>throttles them. Whether you think someone should only be allowed a
    >>certain number of disks a month or not is moot. The fact is Netflix
    >>claims you can have as many disks as you want, meaning if you turn it
    >>over the next day, another shouldl be sent right out, not "you can get
    >>as many as you want unless we deem it's too many, then we'll hold back
    >>some." If somoene turns over their disks the next day, they have the
    >>right to have the next disk in their queue sent out with the same speed
    >>as anyone else. OR, Netflix can simply change their motto to "as many
    >>disks as we think is fair to us." The fact you have decided what is a
    >>"reasonable viewing habit" shows you think your opinion is the one
    >>everyone should adhere to and that's that. After all, you've decided
    >>what is a "reasonable viewing habit."

    >
    >
    > It's really simple. "Unlimited" is exactly that for folks with normal
    > renting/viewing habits, and allows for the odd spikes of a flick or more per day
    > (within the limits of postal service). What's "reasonable" is what allows the
    > company to make a profit while serving most customers - without that, there'd be
    > no company, service, selection, etc. If you aren't getting your desired number
    > of discs per month, try the 8-out plan, or see if you can do better with a
    > competitor.
    >
    > Maybe Netflix should change their advertising, but it doesn't seem to be a
    > problem for any but a few determined to push it to the limit.


    Up till now, they've been assuming the unspoken "All You Can Eat" rule
    that customers will interpret standard business practices in standard
    reasonable fashion, without the need for excessively spelled-out
    disclaimers to prevent unreasonable activity--

    ....So far, Netflix seems to be one of the few companies to encounter the
    exception. -_-

    Derek Janssen (and gosh, kiddies, how did THAT happen?)
     
    Derek Janssen, Dec 5, 2006
    #19
  20. In article <>,
    Derek Janssen <> wrote:

    > Up till now, they've been assuming the unspoken "All You Can Eat" rule
    > that customers will interpret standard business practices in standard
    > reasonable fashion, without the need for excessively spelled-out
    > disclaimers to prevent unreasonable activity--
    >
    > ...So far, Netflix seems to be one of the few companies to encounter the
    > exception. -_-
    >
    > Derek Janssen (and gosh, kiddies, how did THAT happen?)
    >


    "Free is when you don't have to pay for nothing or do nothing.
    We got to be free! Free as the wind!"
    - Frank Zappa, "Teenage Wind"

    --
     
    Haddatten Huttendrut, Dec 5, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

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