Blockbuster Online Rentals

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Richard Nelson, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. I moved from Netflix to Blockbuster for my online rentals. I did this
    mostly for the price and the 2 free local rentals Blockbuster offered.
    I just canceled my blockbuster membership and am moving back to Netflix.
    Blockbuster has a lot of work to do. Of the 30 or 40 movies in my
    queue, All but two are now listed as short or long wait. We are not
    talking about new movies here, but a mixture of new and old.
    Blockbuster received two movies yesterday morning. As of noon today,
    nothing had been moved from my queue to my shipped list.

    I did notice that Blockbuster was selecting one item from the top of my
    queue - where I keep new movies - and one item was selected from the
    bottom of my list when they were shipping more than one movie at a time.
    I called customer service and they confirmed they were doing that to
    be sure all their customers were getting their first choice. In the
    couple of months I have been with blockbuster 3 movies they claimed to
    ship to me never arrived. Blame the post office, but that only happened
    one time in the year or so I was with NetFlix.

    Blockbuster may put NetFlix out of business, but they have a long way to go!

    Its back Netflix for me.

    Richard Nelson
    Richard Nelson, Nov 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. Richard Nelson

    Mike Rowley Guest

    Netflix is the best I think. Besides they just dropped there prices.



    "Richard Nelson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I moved from Netflix to Blockbuster for my online rentals. I did this
    >mostly for the price and the 2 free local rentals Blockbuster offered. I
    >just canceled my blockbuster membership and am moving back to Netflix.
    >Blockbuster has a lot of work to do. Of the 30 or 40 movies in my queue,
    >All but two are now listed as short or long wait. We are not talking about
    >new movies here, but a mixture of new and old. Blockbuster received two
    >movies yesterday morning. As of noon today, nothing had been moved from my
    >queue to my shipped list.
    >
    > I did notice that Blockbuster was selecting one item from the top of my
    > queue - where I keep new movies - and one item was selected from the
    > bottom of my list when they were shipping more than one movie at a time. I
    > called customer service and they confirmed they were doing that to be sure
    > all their customers were getting their first choice. In the couple of
    > months I have been with blockbuster 3 movies they claimed to ship to me
    > never arrived. Blame the post office, but that only happened one time in
    > the year or so I was with NetFlix.
    >
    > Blockbuster may put NetFlix out of business, but they have a long way to
    > go!
    >
    > Its back Netflix for me.
    >
    > Richard Nelson
    >
    Mike Rowley, Nov 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. "Richard Nelson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    <<Blockbuster may put NetFlix out of business, but they have a long way
    to go!>>

    <<Its back Netflix for me.>>


    Blockbuster has been instrumental in making Netflix a success:

    Blockbuster charges $4 for a 1 and 1/2 day DVD rental.

    Blockbuster charges $4 in late fees for DVDs that are only a couple
    of hours late.

    Blockbuster has a lousy DVD selection consisting mainly of action
    junk and lowbrow comedies.

    Blockbuster mixes its VHS tapes and DVDs together so that DVD
    customers have to search through twice the mess to find a title
    worth renting.

    Blockbuster usually takes several weeks to make a meager selection
    of new catalog DVD releases available for rent. Often, new catalog
    releases are available for sale at list prices, but not available
    for rent.

    Blockbuster prefers to rent only fullscreen versions of DVDs that
    are also available in widescreen versions.

    Now that Netflix has solved all of the problems that former Blockbuster
    customers suffered through, Blockbuster wants to compete against Netflix
    by offering a lower price. But with the lower Blockbuster price comes a
    lousy selection, poor service and long waits for out of stock DVD
    titles.

    Every month, Blockbuster sends me coupons for free catalog DVD rentals.
    I don't even bother using them.
    One-Shot Scot, Nov 5, 2004
    #3
  4. Richard Nelson

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <>, One-Shot Scot
    <> wrote:

    > "Richard Nelson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > <<Blockbuster may put NetFlix out of business, but they have a long way
    > to go!>>
    >
    > <<Its back Netflix for me.>>
    >
    >
    > Blockbuster has been instrumental in making Netflix a success:
    >
    > Blockbuster charges $4 for a 1 and 1/2 day DVD rental.
    >

    Also for a 7 day rental.

    > Blockbuster charges $4 in late fees for DVDs that are only a couple
    > of hours late.
    >

    There has to be a cutoff sometime. I suppose it could be like library
    books, where it's $1 a day or something up till it equals the cost of
    the dvd.

    > Blockbuster mixes its VHS tapes and DVDs together so that DVD
    > customers have to search through twice the mess to find a title
    > worth renting.
    >

    And those still renting vhs see that the same titles are avalible on
    dvd. Early on this probably helped many make the switch.

    > Blockbuster usually takes several weeks to make a meager selection
    > of new catalog DVD releases available for rent. Often, new catalog
    > releases are available for sale at list prices, but not available
    > for rent.
    >

    Netflix is still missing a few Japanese films my local Blockbusters has.

    > Blockbuster prefers to rent only fullscreen versions of DVDs that
    > are also available in widescreen versions.
    >

    Mine rents widescreen. Maybe you should move :)

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
    Invid Fan, Nov 5, 2004
    #4
  5. Richard Nelson

    Black Locust Guest

    In article <>,
    "One-Shot Scot" <> wrote:

    Oy. I hate to yet again come off as a Blockbuster spokesperson, but much
    of you written here is not true Scot.

    > Blockbuster has been instrumental in making Netflix a success:
    >
    > Blockbuster charges $4 for a 1 and 1/2 day DVD rental.
    >
    > Blockbuster charges $4 in late fees for DVDs that are only a couple
    > of hours late.


    This part is true and is the primary reason for Netflix's success.
    However Blockbuster has more recently made the effort to at least offer
    an alternative with their in store subscription based service called the
    "Movie Pass."

    > Blockbuster has a lousy DVD selection consisting mainly of action
    > junk and lowbrow comedies.


    Actually, Blockbuster's selection of more rare and hard to find titles
    has increased significantly since they brought DVD's into their stores.
    Sure, Netflix still has much better selection, but it's not a fair
    comparison. Blockbuster stores are restricted to a space usually no more
    than the size of the average persons backyard. They simply do not have
    the shelf space in their stores to carry every DVD ever released.

    > Blockbuster mixes its VHS tapes and DVDs together so that DVD
    > customers have to search through twice the mess to find a title
    > worth renting.


    This is yet again a shelf space issue. They've done what they've felt is
    best to maximize their limited amount of available shelf space. And
    incase you haven't been into any of their stores lately, they decreased
    their VHS selection so dramatically in the past year or so that finding
    something is not really an issue. When they do carry a new release on
    VHS(keep in mind a good 70% of their new releases are DVD only now) they
    usually only order a 2-6 copies of the VHS version. Hardly a mess to dig
    through. It's anyone still trying to rent VHS who's going to have
    trouble finding anything worth renting these days.

    > Blockbuster usually takes several weeks to make a meager selection
    > of new catalog DVD releases available for rent. Often, new catalog
    > releases are available for sale at list prices, but not available
    > for rent.


    This is a bit of a problem in their stores. But remember most of their
    customers are morons who refuse to watch anything that isn't brand new.
    Blockbuster makes 90% of their profits off of renting new releases. Many
    of their customers rent "White Chicks" simply because it's a new
    release. Sad, but true.

    > Blockbuster prefers to rent only fullscreen versions of DVDs that
    > are also available in widescreen versions.


    Now here's your biggest lie. Blockbuster only rents widescreen DVD's.
    They've even gone on the record saying they prefer widescreen DVD's.
    It's been this way for a couple years now.

    > Every month, Blockbuster sends me coupons for free catalog DVD rentals.
    > I don't even bother using them.


    I do. Free is free as far as I'm concerned. But hey, it's your choice.
    --
    "Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we.
    They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people,
    and neither do we." - George Dumbya Bush
    Black Locust, Nov 6, 2004
    #5
  6. "Black Locust" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > "One-Shot Scot" <> wrote:
    >
    > Oy. I hate to yet again come off as a Blockbuster spokesperson, but
    > much of you written here is not true Scot.



    What I wrote was true in 2002. I have not set foot in a Blockbuster
    store for over 2 years, so I have not seen any attempts by Blockbuster
    to become more like Netflix. One thing is certain: If it had not been
    for Netflix, Blockbuster would have made none of the changes you have
    noted.

    Maybe things have changed for the better at Blockbuster, but renting
    DVDs from Netflix is so vastly superior to renting from Blockbuster, I
    will probably never rent from Blockbuster again.

    One thing is certain, renting DVDs from Netflix is a LOT cheaper and
    MUCH more convenient than renting from Blockbuster.
    One-Shot Scot, Nov 6, 2004
    #6
  7. "Invid Fan" <> wrote in message
    news:051120041412076724%...
    > In article <>, One-Shot Scot
    > <> wrote:


    <<That Blockbuster isn't as bad as it used to be.>>


    Once you have been pissed off by a company and found a better way to do
    business, it is very difficult to go back. I feel that Blockbuster is
    only doing what is forced to do in an attempt to hang on to its
    shrinking customer base.

    It's kind of like what is happening with cable TV vs. satellite. After
    years of lousy service, poor reception and high prices, the cable TV
    companies are trying to win back former customers who have switched to
    satellite. My local cable company has even offered to buy my satellite
    dish if I sign up for more of their lousy service, poor reception and
    high prices.

    Well, it's too late. The cable companies never cared about their
    customers and they are only pretending to care about them now. If it
    weren't for the satellite companies, cable TV service would be worse
    than ever. I feel the same way about Blockbuster.

    But I don't cry over the cable company's dwindling customer base. Cable
    companies will always have a captive audience comprised of people who do
    not have line of sight access to the southern sky. The cable companies
    can continue to screw these customers unmercifully.
    One-Shot Scot, Nov 6, 2004
    #7
  8. Richard Nelson

    Joseph Guest

    Another thing no one has mentioned - those horrible edited movies that
    BB carries. BB always claimed to be a "family store" and thus would
    not carry films that received an NC-17 rating (or some that didn't
    receive a rating at all due to content).

    Example:

    If you're looking for Cronenberg's film "Crash", you will have to
    settle for the "R-rated" version that, from what I understand, was
    created specifically for sell to BB. I have not seen this version, but
    heard it doesn't make much sense with all the "objectable" material
    removed. (So now it's "family friendly"??)

    After leaving BB because I couldn't find anything and they never
    seemed to carry several new independent or foreign films (AND the fact
    that they used to carry only fullscreen versions of DVDs (I don't have
    any first hand experience that this has changed) - this problem has
    been much discussed in the past on Roger Ebert's website in the Answer
    Man column), I started going across the street to Hollywood Video.
    What do you know, I caught them doing the same thing - carrying only
    R-rated versions and not original unrated or NC-17 (hey, I'm no perv,
    but I believe in maintaining a director's vision and I HATE
    censorship).

    So it was bye-bye video stores, and hello Netflix. I had a bumpy ride
    the first year, but it's been smooth sailing ever since (helped
    greatly by more shipping locations - one in the D.C. area).

    Netflix member since June 2001.


    "One-Shot Scot" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > "Black Locust" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > In article <>,
    > > "One-Shot Scot" <> wrote:
    > >
    > > Oy. I hate to yet again come off as a Blockbuster spokesperson, but
    > > much of you written here is not true Scot.

    >
    >
    > What I wrote was true in 2002. I have not set foot in a Blockbuster
    > store for over 2 years, so I have not seen any attempts by Blockbuster
    > to become more like Netflix. One thing is certain: If it had not been
    > for Netflix, Blockbuster would have made none of the changes you have
    > noted.
    >
    > Maybe things have changed for the better at Blockbuster, but renting
    > DVDs from Netflix is so vastly superior to renting from Blockbuster, I
    > will probably never rent from Blockbuster again.
    >
    > One thing is certain, renting DVDs from Netflix is a LOT cheaper and
    > MUCH more convenient than renting from Blockbuster.
    Joseph, Nov 9, 2004
    #8
  9. Richard Nelson

    Edward Reid Guest

    On Sat, 6 Nov 2004 0:12:39 -0500, Black Locust wrote
    > They simply do not have
    > the shelf space in their stores to carry every DVD ever released.


    They could do it easily if they really wanted to and were willing to
    throw a lot of money at it.

    Kept in plain envelopes, I estimate about 15 DVDs per inch. I think
    Netflix now says 25,000 DVDs, so about 1700 inches, or 140 feet. Say 14
    feet of wall space with 10 shelves (total height 5 feet). Of course,
    they'd have to be labeled and organized in some way to enable finding a
    specific one, and maintaining that organization would mean that only
    staff would be allowed to take them on and off the shelves. (How many
    here are old enough to remember closed stacks in university libraries?)
    Even tripling my estimates to allow for less dense storage, 40 feet of
    wall space should suffice.

    That's a trivial amount of space for a video rental store. Of course,
    the cost would be enormous, and in any given store most would never be
    rented. To make money on that part of the store, they'd have to charge
    an arm and a leg for them. It just wouldn't make sense.

    So it's an economic issue, not a space issue. A neighborhood rental
    store will never have physical stock of 25,000 DVDs, not even in a
    large city. The ability to rent any of 25,000 DVDs from a local store
    might arrive when the local store can keep them all on a petabyte disk
    and burn one in five minutes for a customer, along with the changes in
    licensing that would have to go with such a scheme.

    Edward
    Edward Reid, Nov 9, 2004
    #9
  10. Richard Nelson

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <>, Joseph
    <> wrote:

    > Another thing no one has mentioned - those horrible edited movies that
    > BB carries. BB always claimed to be a "family store" and thus would
    > not carry films that received an NC-17 rating (or some that didn't
    > receive a rating at all due to content).
    >
    > Example:
    >
    > If you're looking for Cronenberg's film "Crash", you will have to
    > settle for the "R-rated" version that, from what I understand, was
    > created specifically for sell to BB. I have not seen this version, but
    > heard it doesn't make much sense with all the "objectable" material
    > removed. (So now it's "family friendly"??)
    >

    My local BB has a dvd of 'Crash' with both R and NC-17 on it.

    > After leaving BB because I couldn't find anything and they never
    > seemed to carry several new independent or foreign films (AND the fact
    > that they used to carry only fullscreen versions of DVDs (I don't have
    > any first hand experience that this has changed) - this problem has
    > been much discussed in the past on Roger Ebert's website in the Answer
    > Man column), I started going across the street to Hollywood Video.
    > What do you know, I caught them doing the same thing - carrying only
    > R-rated versions and not original unrated or NC-17 (hey, I'm no perv,
    > but I believe in maintaining a director's vision and I HATE
    > censorship).
    >

    Locally BB has the unrated versions of the American Pie movies, Y Tu
    Mama Tambien, and many others. Hollywood Video doesn't.

    > So it was bye-bye video stores, and hello Netflix. I had a bumpy ride
    > the first year, but it's been smooth sailing ever since (helped
    > greatly by more shipping locations - one in the D.C. area).
    >
    > Netflix member since June 2001.
    >

    I was going to drop Netflix, as I'm renting films I don't care about at
    the moment and they still have gaps in the selection. With the price
    drop I'll wait another month or two and get what few titles I'm still
    interested in.

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
    Invid Fan, Nov 10, 2004
    #10
  11. Richard Nelson

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <>,
    Edward Reid <> wrote:

    > On Sat, 6 Nov 2004 0:12:39 -0500, Black Locust wrote
    > > They simply do not have
    > > the shelf space in their stores to carry every DVD ever released.

    >
    > They could do it easily if they really wanted to and were willing to
    > throw a lot of money at it.
    >
    > Kept in plain envelopes, I estimate about 15 DVDs per inch. I think
    > Netflix now says 25,000 DVDs, so about 1700 inches, or 140 feet. Say 14
    > feet of wall space with 10 shelves (total height 5 feet). Of course,
    > they'd have to be labeled and organized in some way to enable finding a
    > specific one, and maintaining that organization would mean that only
    > staff would be allowed to take them on and off the shelves. (How many
    > here are old enough to remember closed stacks in university libraries?)
    > Even tripling my estimates to allow for less dense storage, 40 feet of
    > wall space should suffice.
    >

    And it would be a bitch to browse there :) As for closed stacks, I
    assume most large libraries still have them. The downtown Buffalo one
    still did the last time I went down there.

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
    Invid Fan, Nov 10, 2004
    #11
  12. Richard Nelson

    Edward Reid Guest

    On Tue, 9 Nov 2004 19:29:08 -0500, Invid Fan wrote
    > And it would be a bitch to browse there :)


    Yeah, they'd actually have to provide, imagine it, terminals so you can
    look up what you want ... do any brick and mortar video stores do this
    now? I haven't been in one in a long time (probably 5+ years), but
    every time I've done that, one of my biggest objections has been that I
    can't just go in and look up a movie or actor or director. They wanted
    me to browse and nothing else.

    My favorite video store story: I once walked up to the counter and
    asked the young girl there, do you have 'Rope'? She said, you mean like
    to wrap a package? And she was serious. And needless to say, the store
    did not have it. Eventually I found it at the public library.

    > As for closed stacks, I
    > assume most large libraries still have them. The downtown Buffalo one
    > still did the last time I went down there.


    Interesting. I haven't run into closed stacks in a long time except for
    special collections and other things too valuable to have the hoi
    polloi sticking their fingers in. Maybe it's a regional thing.

    Edward

    I see the brevity of truth
    Edward Reid, Nov 10, 2004
    #12
  13. Richard Nelson

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <>,
    Edward Reid <> wrote:

    > On Tue, 9 Nov 2004 19:29:08 -0500, Invid Fan wrote
    > > And it would be a bitch to browse there :)

    >
    > Yeah, they'd actually have to provide, imagine it, terminals so you can
    > look up what you want ... do any brick and mortar video stores do this
    > now? I haven't been in one in a long time (probably 5+ years), but
    > every time I've done that, one of my biggest objections has been that I
    > can't just go in and look up a movie or actor or director. They wanted
    > me to browse and nothing else.
    >

    Me, I enjoy browsing. If I can't look at random dvd cases I'll end up
    not renting anything.

    > > As for closed stacks, I
    > > assume most large libraries still have them. The downtown Buffalo one
    > > still did the last time I went down there.

    >
    > Interesting. I haven't run into closed stacks in a long time except for
    > special collections and other things too valuable to have the hoi
    > polloi sticking their fingers in. Maybe it's a regional thing.
    >

    Or they just have more books then they can fit out on the shelves. The
    main areas have lots of room to walk around, or sit and read. The
    stacks are probably tightly packed with books. They also have a rare
    book room, naturally.

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
    Invid Fan, Nov 10, 2004
    #13
  14. Richard Nelson

    awknod Guest

    Just wondering what they charge for dvd rentals online, I can rent unlimited
    new releases for 99 cents each, on mondays at a local store. I bet they
    can`t beat that for new releases.
    "Invid Fan" <> wrote in message
    news:101120040351499806%...
    > In article <>,
    > Edward Reid <> wrote:
    >
    > > On Tue, 9 Nov 2004 19:29:08 -0500, Invid Fan wrote
    > > > And it would be a bitch to browse there :)

    > >
    > > Yeah, they'd actually have to provide, imagine it, terminals so you can
    > > look up what you want ... do any brick and mortar video stores do this
    > > now? I haven't been in one in a long time (probably 5+ years), but
    > > every time I've done that, one of my biggest objections has been that I
    > > can't just go in and look up a movie or actor or director. They wanted
    > > me to browse and nothing else.
    > >

    > Me, I enjoy browsing. If I can't look at random dvd cases I'll end up
    > not renting anything.
    >
    > > > As for closed stacks, I
    > > > assume most large libraries still have them. The downtown Buffalo one
    > > > still did the last time I went down there.

    > >
    > > Interesting. I haven't run into closed stacks in a long time except for
    > > special collections and other things too valuable to have the hoi
    > > polloi sticking their fingers in. Maybe it's a regional thing.
    > >

    > Or they just have more books then they can fit out on the shelves. The
    > main areas have lots of room to walk around, or sit and read. The
    > stacks are probably tightly packed with books. They also have a rare
    > book room, naturally.
    >
    > --
    > Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    > 'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    > -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
    awknod, Nov 10, 2004
    #14
  15. Richard Nelson

    awknod Guest

    Just wondering what they charge for dvd rentals online, I can rent unlimited
    new releases for 99 cents each, on mondays at a local store. I bet they
    can`t beat that for new releases.
    "Invid Fan" <> wrote in message
    news:101120040351499806%...
    > In article <>,
    > Edward Reid <> wrote:
    >
    > > On Tue, 9 Nov 2004 19:29:08 -0500, Invid Fan wrote
    > > > And it would be a bitch to browse there :)

    > >
    > > Yeah, they'd actually have to provide, imagine it, terminals so you can
    > > look up what you want ... do any brick and mortar video stores do this
    > > now? I haven't been in one in a long time (probably 5+ years), but
    > > every time I've done that, one of my biggest objections has been that I
    > > can't just go in and look up a movie or actor or director. They wanted
    > > me to browse and nothing else.
    > >

    > Me, I enjoy browsing. If I can't look at random dvd cases I'll end up
    > not renting anything.
    >
    > > > As for closed stacks, I
    > > > assume most large libraries still have them. The downtown Buffalo one
    > > > still did the last time I went down there.

    > >
    > > Interesting. I haven't run into closed stacks in a long time except for
    > > special collections and other things too valuable to have the hoi
    > > polloi sticking their fingers in. Maybe it's a regional thing.
    > >

    > Or they just have more books then they can fit out on the shelves. The
    > main areas have lots of room to walk around, or sit and read. The
    > stacks are probably tightly packed with books. They also have a rare
    > book room, naturally.
    >
    > --
    > Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    > 'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    > -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
    awknod, Nov 10, 2004
    #15
  16. In article <>,
    "awknod" <> wrote:

    > Just wondering what they charge for dvd rentals online, I can rent unlimited
    > new releases for 99 cents each, on mondays at a local store. I bet they
    > can`t beat that for new releases.


    Lessee...based on my $18 per month Netflix charge and how many rentals
    I've gotten in the past 12 months as an average it's about the same.

    But...no driving back and forth to the store, no late fees and the
    ability to hold on to the movie for as long as I'd like. And, if you're
    wondering, the new releases are in my mailbox Wednesday.
    Reginald Dwight, Nov 10, 2004
    #16
  17. Richard Nelson

    Joseph Guest

    Invid Fan <> wrote in message news:<091120041924176943%>...
    > >

    > My local BB has a dvd of 'Crash' with both R and NC-17 on it.
    > >

    > Locally BB has the unrated versions of the American Pie movies, Y Tu
    > Mama Tambien, and many others. Hollywood Video doesn't.
    >


    I assure you, that is a rarity. Perhaps your local store manager has
    more control about what his store receives - or BB has since changed
    their policy because of complaints.

    BB's rejection of NC-17 and unrated films is much documented. Because
    of the lack of the films you cited that were not at my local BB (and I
    live in the greater DC area - not exactly the sticks), it became a
    primarily reason that pushed me to Netflix.

    Another plus is that I no longer have to rush out to BB after work on
    Tuesdays to try to grab the new releases - in some cases, it would be
    too late. I don't have that problem with Netflix.

    > I was going to drop Netflix, as I'm renting films I don't care about at
    > the moment and they still have gaps in the selection. With the price
    > drop I'll wait another month or two and get what few titles I'm still
    > interested in.


    The bottom line is that BB has over the years monopolized the market,
    pushed all the Mom-and-Pops out of business, and then built up a huge
    customer base. Then they felt they didn't have to cater to anyone
    anymore because there wasn't another option to video rentals.

    Netflix, in my opinion, caters to the film-phile. They have 99% of
    every DVD currently on the market (the one problem with Netflix is
    that if a company stops making a DVD, it's no longer available on
    Netflix until it's re-released). BB caters only to the general public.
    They usually have one copy of an indie or foreign film, if at all. Too
    bad if there's more than one person who wants to see it.

    On-line rental also requires you to rent a number of DVDs a month to
    make it worthwhile, and they count on the people who don't rent that
    much. I don't have that problem myself.

    As long as they continue with the great service, I have no reason to
    complain. I'm kind of glad BB and Wal-Mart have created on-line
    services as I got a nice price drop from Netflix.
    Joseph, Nov 10, 2004
    #17
  18. Richard Nelson

    Joseph Guest

    Invid Fan <> wrote in message news:<101120040351499806%>...
    > >

    > Me, I enjoy browsing. If I can't look at random dvd cases I'll end up
    > not renting anything.
    >


    A good point. And that's the distinction between the typical BB renter
    and the film-phile. I'm a huge movie lover and I follow new releases
    pretty closely and can tell from reviews and such if I want to see a
    movie or not. When the movie is released, I already know if I want to
    see it without having to look at the box. My browsing through BB has
    always consisted of that - looking for a specific movie and ignoring
    box covers.

    Netflix can't replace this, but they do give you ideas of the variety
    "if you like this film, perhaps you'll also enjoy...". That's
    something that most video clerks can't even help you with (though when
    I was a video clerk from '84-'92, I gave a much different experience).
    It provides a helpful database of info.
    Joseph, Nov 10, 2004
    #18
  19. In article <>,
    One-Shot Scot <> wrote:
    >"Invid Fan" <> wrote in message
    >news:051120041412076724%...
    >> In article <>, One-Shot Scot
    >> <> wrote:


    ><<That Blockbuster isn't as bad as it used to be.>>



    >Once you have been pissed off by a company and found a better way to do
    >business, it is very difficult to go back. I feel that Blockbuster is
    >only doing what is forced to do in an attempt to hang on to its
    >shrinking customer base.


    >It's kind of like what is happening with cable TV vs. satellite. After
    >years of lousy service, poor reception and high prices, the cable TV
    >companies are trying to win back former customers who have switched to
    >satellite. My local cable company has even offered to buy my satellite
    >dish if I sign up for more of their lousy service, poor reception and
    >high prices.


    I left cable about 10 years ago when they weren't carrying TCM - so
    I moved to satellite.

    Over the years as satellite added more and more local channels
    the film channels started looking softer and softer. There was no
    noise and the color was better but the definition at times seemed
    no better than VHS.

    I moved to digital cable about 3 years ago. Since I like movies
    I found the price for the premium channles on both brought the
    monthly cost to be almost identical.

    But I have far more choice on cable than I ever did on satellite.

    But digital cable hasn't made it's way everywhere. They push the
    video-on-demand for the premium channels so you can pause, rewind,
    etc. just like a VCR but I have not gone that way.

    But things are getting competitive enough many of the special type
    programs the news channels have are now on VOD free.

    It's one of those competitive environments where one tends to be
    ahead for awhile then the other. To get the equivalent of VOD
    on satellite you need to have the extra TIVO option.

    >Well, it's too late. The cable companies never cared about their
    >customers and they are only pretending to care about them now. If it
    >weren't for the satellite companies, cable TV service would be worse
    >than ever. I feel the same way about Blockbuster.


    Never rented a thing from BB.

    Bill
    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
    Bill Vermillion, Nov 11, 2004
    #19
  20. Richard Nelson

    Edward Reid Guest

    Invid Fan <> wrote in message news:
    > Me, I enjoy browsing. If I can't look at random dvd cases I'll end up
    > not renting anything.


    Oh, there are times I enjoy browsing. I just don't like it to be the
    only way I can find a movie -- or a book. And the selection that's out
    on the racks in most video stores isn't part of the selection I'd like
    to browse in.

    > Or they just have more books then they can fit out on the shelves. The
    > main areas have lots of room to walk around, or sit and read. The
    > stacks are probably tightly packed with books. They also have a rare
    > book room, naturally.


    Yes, I remember going into the UF closed stacks once or twice when I
    was growing up. (Don't recall how I got in, but I was probably with my
    father, who was on the faculty.) Ugly shelving, narrow aisles, low
    ceilings, dim lighting.

    But what I see nowadays to save space is "compact shelving", which
    packs things much tighter but remains open stacks. Up to a dozen or so
    shelf units are on wheels and rails, with space for only a single
    aisle. Buttons on the ends activate motors which move the shelves to
    open the aisle between any two given shelves. So any shelf can be
    easily reached with a minimum of wasted floor space. Of course this
    increases the load even beyond the high loads that libraries already
    carry -- but I think big libraries now are built with concrete anyway.
    There's some sort of interlock to prevent the shelves from closing on
    a person ... presumably ... I think ... never tried it ... maybe we
    have a Hitchcock story coming here ...

    Edward
    Edward Reid, Nov 11, 2004
    #20
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