Blacks in printer produced prints and those in silver halide darkroom prints.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Frankie, Oct 30, 2008.

  1. Frankie

    Frankie Guest

    Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    (At least that is how I have heard it described.)

    Frankie
    Frankie, Oct 30, 2008
    #1
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  2. Frankie

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Frankie <> wrote:
    >Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    >from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    >(At least that is how I have heard it described.)


    The short, glib, and admittedly useless answer is:
    Yes. Spend more money.

    --
    Ray Fischer
    Ray Fischer, Oct 30, 2008
    #2
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  3. Frankie

    Frankie Guest

    On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 12:29:59 -0500, Allen <> wrote:

    >Ray Fischer wrote:
    >> Frankie <> wrote:
    >>> Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    >>>from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    >>> (At least that is how I have heard it described.)

    >>
    >> The short, glib, and admittedly useless answer is:
    >> Yes. Spend more money.
    >>

    >True, but you might not have to spend as much as you would to build a
    >darkroom, buy a good enlarger, and spend a goodly amount on the rest of
    >the darkroom equipment, paper and chemicals. I sometimes tend to choke
    >up when I look at the price of those top-quality printers, but when I
    >convert the prices I paid for all the above in the '40s and '50s to 2008
    >dollars I realize what a bargain some of the current stuff is. And I
    >haven't considered groping around in near-darkness, having to make test
    >strips, perhaps allergies to so of the chemicals, maintaing constant
    >temperature, and on and on and on......
    >
    >Allen


    Your a bigger pile of shite than the last one!

    What is it with usenet? Every damaged personality seems to
    head straight for it after discharge!

    Are you both Yankee supporters?

    Frankie.
    Frankie, Oct 30, 2008
    #3
  4. Frankie

    Frankie Guest

    On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 16:07:07 +0000, Frankie <> wrote:

    >Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    >from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    >(At least that is how I have heard it described.)
    >
    >Frankie


    I ask a reasonable question and it attracts the intellectual dross of
    the known universe!

    Frankie.

    PLONK x2
    Frankie, Oct 30, 2008
    #4
  5. Frankie

    Roy G Guest

    "Frankie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 16:07:07 +0000, Frankie <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    >>from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    >>(At least that is how I have heard it described.)
    >>
    >>Frankie

    >
    > I ask a reasonable question and it attracts the intellectual dross of
    > the known universe!
    >
    > Frankie.
    >
    > PLONK x2



    Yes, you could.

    You might need to change your printer, you don't say which one you are
    using.

    You might need to spend some time learning how to do it, you don't say how
    experienced you are.

    Roy G
    Roy G, Oct 30, 2008
    #5
  6. Frankie

    ransley Guest

    Re: Blacks in printer produced prints and those in silver halidedarkroom prints.

    On Oct 30, 11:07 am, Frankie <> wrote:
    > Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    > from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    > (At least that is how I have heard it described.)
    >
    > Frankie


    You can do it but need to research what you need. Look into a new
    printer they are cheap and are only recently are being optimised for
    B&W. A few years ago Canon was imparting an off color and Epson and Hp
    were better, but things are changing, you need to find a few review
    comparisons. What program you use is important, do you apply B&W
    filters in editing.
    ransley, Oct 30, 2008
    #6
  7. Frankie

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Frankie <> wrote:
    > Frankie <> wrote:


    >>Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    >>from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    >>(At least that is how I have heard it described.)

    >
    >I ask a reasonable question and it attracts the intellectual dross of
    >the known universe!


    You asked a stupid question and you got what you deserved. If you
    weren't such a lazy asshole you've have done some research and found
    out more about high-end photo printers for yourself.

    --
    Ray Fischer
    Ray Fischer, Oct 31, 2008
    #7
  8. Frankie

    Don Stauffer Guest

    Re: Blacks in printer produced prints and those in silver halidedarkroom prints.

    Frankie wrote:
    > Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    > from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    > (At least that is how I have heard it described.)
    >
    > Frankie


    There is a type of printer known as a "screen printer" that uses a high
    resolution CRT monitor and a camera permanently attached to the monitor
    which is loaded with photographic film. The image is displayed on the
    screen, and the camera exposes a negative. That negative is then
    printed by normal photographic process. These printers were common in
    early days of digital photography, but I think they are being replaced
    with dye subs and commercial inkjets. But you still may be able to find
    a commercial shop that uses the CRT screen printer. They were too
    expensive to be useful for home setup. These printers could also be
    loaded with transparency film and used to make high quality positives
    (slides).
    Don Stauffer, Oct 31, 2008
    #8
  9. Frankie

    Marvin Guest

    Re: Blacks in printer produced prints and those in silver halidedarkroom prints.

    Frankie wrote:
    > Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    > from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    > (At least that is how I have heard it described.)
    >
    > Frankie


    I t is hard to answer this question, except by asking what
    you mean by "quality". I assume "the old fashioned way"
    means conventional photo prints, where the black pigment is
    actually silver particles. The particles can tarnish over
    time, giving the familiar sepia tone of old photos.

    I use an HP printer, and I've had great B/W and color prints
    since I started using the special black cartridge for photos
    that HP sells. The cartridge holds inks that print as
    shades of gray.
    Marvin, Oct 31, 2008
    #9
  10. Frankie

    Frankie Guest

    On Thu, 30 Oct 2008 21:55:59 -0400, "RichA" <> wrote:

    Thanks for that.

    >There is a company on the East Coast of Canada that specializes in carbon
    >black for printing which apparently produces a much wider range (and better
    >blacks) of tones than current inkjet inks. I can't remember their name
    >though.
    >
    >"Frankie" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    >> from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    >> (At least that is how I have heard it described.)
    >>
    >> Frankie

    >
    Frankie, Oct 31, 2008
    #10
  11. Frankie

    Frankie Guest

    On 30 Oct 2008 21:39:01 -0500, "Toby" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Frankie" <> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    >news:...
    >> Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    >> from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fashioned way".
    >> (At least that is how I have heard it described.)
    >>
    >> Frankie

    >
    >The Epson Maxart printers are supposed to produce exceptional B&W prints.
    >Some reviewers have said that they got better monochrome results from them
    >than they ever got in a wet darkroom.
    >
    >Toby
    >


    Thanks for your contribution.
    Frankie, Oct 31, 2008
    #11
  12. Frankie

    Frankie Guest

    On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 12:52:47 -0500, JD <> wrote:

    >Frankie wrote:
    >> On Fri, 31 Oct 2008 07:37:44 -0500, JD <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Frankie wrote:
    >>>> Is there any way I can produce the same "quality" of image
    >>>> from a printer that I can from darkroom work. The "old fasioned way".
    >>>> (At least that is how I have heard it described.)
    >>>>
    >>>> Frakie
    >>>>
    >>> Epson makes a variety of "photo" inkjet printers that produce a pretty
    >>> good image when used with one of their inkjet papers.
    >>>
    >>> I don't do black and white prints but I'm impressed with the color
    >>> prints from my Epson Stylus Photo R280. $100
    >>>
    >>> From Epson web page:
    >>>
    >>> The Epson Stylus Photo R2400 delivers large, archival prints worthy of
    >>> gallery display. Its pigment ink set, 8-color Epson UltraChrome K3™,
    >>> includes three levels of black and sets a new standard in fine art
    >>> photography and black and white prints. $800.

    >>
    >> Thanks for that.

    >
    >You're welcome.
    >
    >I'm surprised that nobody else replied to your question.
    >
    >I was an advertising photographer for 16 years and spent more time than
    >I'd like in a black and white darkroom making prints. I jobbed out the
    >film development but found I could produce a better print than most labs
    >and/or my assistant. I retired before digital photography was acceptable
    >in advertising photography.
    >
    >Photography is just a hobby now.
    >
    >One of the local photo labs used to accept digital images and print them
    >on photo paper. I compared one of their prints to one of my prints on an
    >older Epson photo printer and I actually liked the Epson print better.
    >This was many years ago and it was a color print.
    >
    >I was a big fan of Ansel Adams and used the Zone system for exposure and
    >development of my black and white film. I also used 4 X 5 inch Polaroid
    >negatives.
    >
    >And there is no money in the world that could get me to go back into a
    >darkroom. Processes, like a contrast mask, were time consuming when done
    >"the old fashioned way". Now they're a plug-in in Photoshop.
    >
    >My current Epson printer is a Stylus Photo R280. It does a great photo
    >print although the six cartridges cost more than the printer. A small
    >price to pay to do all my work on a computer screen and make a print in
    >a minute or two.


    Thanks. Photoshop and digital certainly make all the difference!
    However, I miss the nice deep sparkling blacks!

    Frankie.
    Frankie, Nov 1, 2008
    #12
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