Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Ablang, Jan 20, 2008.

  1. Ablang

    Ablang Guest

    Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    No, I'm not joining those who have predicted that Sony's Blu-ray has
    won over HD-DVD. What I'm suggesting is the optical disc format has
    reached it's peak and will go the way of the cassette tape.

    Forget about the DVD Wars
    The battle between Blu-Ray and HD-DVD format hasn't helped. Even with
    Warner Brothers exclusively backing the Blu-Ray Association, sales of
    movies on disc has been on the decline. This week at CES a lot of
    folks are calling Blu-Ray a winner even though the adult industry and
    Microsoft has backed HD-DVD.

    Some have also said Microsoft wants both to fail because "They want
    confusion in the market until they perfect the digital downloads." I
    say, "It worked!". In fact today, Microsoft acknowledged it is backing
    off plans to promote HD-DVD exclusively in its xBox game console.
    Advocates for both claim superior video and audio but they're missing
    what consumers want. There's a point where the average human can't
    detect the differences in sound and appearance. If anything, the
    increases in clarity can show more flaws in productions. Why would I
    pay $20+ for disc when I can just download the movie to my PC or TiVo
    for $12 or less.

    The future media is Solid State Memory or what's commonly called Flash
    memory. I wrote about this a year ago, and I'll stick by last years
    prediction.
    Granted a Blu-ray DVD can hold 25 GB's per layer it's only a matter of
    time before we see an explosion in Flash(NAND) memory size. HD-DVD
    only holds 15 GB per layer. Yesterday at CES SanDisk introduced a new
    12 GB microSDHD card. SanDisk calculates with 12 GB you can store a
    24.5 hours of video along with 2,600 photos and 1,500 songs.

    Alternates to DVD

    While the size and cost of flash memory isn't there yet it's coming.
    It's not likely I can fit a Blu-ray disc into my Phone, GPS or video
    camera. No moving parts or lasers means my battery will last a lot
    longer watching a movie from flash memory. It's also much easier and
    cheaper to build a flash memory slot into a new TV or other home
    appliance than it is a disc player.
    My new OLPC XO laptop isn't the first laptop to choose a flash drive
    in place of a mechanical hard drive and DVD and it won't be the last.
    No moving parts, minimal power consumption, well over 100,000 write
    cycles, all means my next laptop will include a solid state drive
    instead of a legacy hard drive. I won't miss trying to figure out if
    my DVD player supports +R - R, +RW or -RW.

    http://billpstudios.blogspot.com/2008/01/death-to-dvd-disc-is-coming.html
     
    Ablang, Jan 20, 2008
    #1
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  2. Ablang

    PapaBear Guest

    I've also foreseen the end to movie DVDs but believe they'll be around for
    awhile. I can't predict how long, but I'm betting on another 5-10 years. In
    the meantime it might be wise to stockpile a supply of the equipment needed
    to play them, like some ordinary DVD players, TVs, blank DVDs and burners
    (if you burn them), etc. There's no guarantee those things will be around
    for much longer.
     
    PapaBear, Jan 20, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 22:11:26 -0800 (PST), Ablang <>
    wrote:

    > Death to the DVD Disc is Coming
    >
    >No, I'm not joining those who have predicted that Sony's Blu-ray has
    >won over HD-DVD. What I'm suggesting is the optical disc format has
    >reached it's peak and will go the way of the cassette tape.
    >
    >Forget about the DVD Wars
    >The battle between Blu-Ray and HD-DVD format hasn't helped. Even with
    >Warner Brothers exclusively backing the Blu-Ray Association, sales of
    >movies on disc has been on the decline. This week at CES a lot of
    >folks are calling Blu-Ray a winner even though the adult industry and
    >Microsoft has backed HD-DVD.
    >
    >Some have also said Microsoft wants both to fail because "They want
    >confusion in the market until they perfect the digital downloads." I
    >say, "It worked!". In fact today, Microsoft acknowledged it is backing
    >off plans to promote HD-DVD exclusively in its xBox game console.
    >Advocates for both claim superior video and audio but they're missing
    >what consumers want. There's a point where the average human can't
    >detect the differences in sound and appearance. If anything, the
    >increases in clarity can show more flaws in productions. Why would I
    >pay $20+ for disc when I can just download the movie to my PC or TiVo
    >for $12 or less.
    >
    >The future media is Solid State Memory or what's commonly called Flash
    >memory. I wrote about this a year ago, and I'll stick by last years
    >prediction.
    >Granted a Blu-ray DVD can hold 25 GB's per layer it's only a matter of
    >time before we see an explosion in Flash(NAND) memory size. HD-DVD
    >only holds 15 GB per layer. Yesterday at CES SanDisk introduced a new
    >12 GB microSDHD card. SanDisk calculates with 12 GB you can store a
    >24.5 hours of video along with 2,600 photos and 1,500 songs.
    >
    >Alternates to DVD
    >
    >While the size and cost of flash memory isn't there yet it's coming.
    >It's not likely I can fit a Blu-ray disc into my Phone, GPS or video
    >camera. No moving parts or lasers means my battery will last a lot
    >longer watching a movie from flash memory. It's also much easier and
    >cheaper to build a flash memory slot into a new TV or other home
    >appliance than it is a disc player.
    >My new OLPC XO laptop isn't the first laptop to choose a flash drive
    >in place of a mechanical hard drive and DVD and it won't be the last.
    >No moving parts, minimal power consumption, well over 100,000 write
    >cycles, all means my next laptop will include a solid state drive
    >instead of a legacy hard drive. I won't miss trying to figure out if
    >my DVD player supports +R - R, +RW or -RW.
    >
    >http://billpstudios.blogspot.com/2008/01/death-to-dvd-disc-is-coming.html


    Aw, Bill's just upset because he came in second place this time with
    the format war. Now, he's going to try to snuff it off by offering
    something in it's place so he can still look like he's some kind of
    technological leader. A "bit" arrogant, isn't it? Why should I
    support HD-DVD from someone that puts out the worst products of the
    year? (Based on editorial reviews) Oh yeah, early adopters knew what
    they were getting into 'cause the same thing happened with HDTV just a
    few years ago! HDTVs weren't upgradeable. They've probably already
    bought new HDTVs since then. That's the risk they take. They need to
    quit whining and move on.
     
    Just Visiting, Jan 20, 2008
    #3
  4. Ablang

    Dick Sidbury Guest

    In article <h7Ckj.41542$>,
    "PapaBear" <2x> wrote:

    > I've also foreseen the end to movie DVDs but believe they'll be around for
    > awhile. I can't predict how long, but I'm betting on another 5-10 years. In
    > the meantime it might be wise to stockpile a supply of the equipment needed
    > to play them, like some ordinary DVD players, TVs, blank DVDs and burners
    > (if you burn them), etc. There's no guarantee those things will be around
    > for much longer.


    Just like video tapes and VCRs.

    dick
     
    Dick Sidbury, Jan 20, 2008
    #4
  5. Ablang

    Mark Jones Guest

    Dick Sidbury wrote:
    > In article <h7Ckj.41542$>,
    > "PapaBear" <2x> wrote:
    >
    >> I've also foreseen the end to movie DVDs but believe they'll be
    >> around for awhile. I can't predict how long, but I'm betting on
    >> another 5-10 years. In the meantime it might be wise to stockpile a
    >> supply of the equipment needed to play them, like some ordinary DVD
    >> players, TVs, blank DVDs and burners (if you burn them), etc.
    >> There's no guarantee those things will be around for much longer.

    >
    > Just like video tapes and VCRs.


    VCRs are still being sold, but I haven't seen a movie for sale on
    tape in a long time.
     
    Mark Jones, Jan 20, 2008
    #5
  6. Ablang

    Guest

    Re: Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    On Jan 20, 3:57 pm, "Mark Jones" <> wrote:
    > Dick Sidbury wrote:
    > > In article <h7Ckj.41542$>,
    > >  "PapaBear" <2x> wrote:

    >
    > >> I've also foreseen the end to movie DVDs but believe they'll be
    > >> around for awhile. I can't predict how long, but I'm betting on
    > >> another 5-10 years. In the meantime it might be wise to stockpile a
    > >> supply of the equipment needed to play them, like some ordinary DVD
    > >> players, TVs, blank DVDs and burners (if you burn them), etc.
    > >> There's no guarantee those things will be around for much longer.

    >
    > > Just like video tapes and VCRs.

    >
    > VCRs are still being sold, but I haven't seen a movie for sale on
    > tape in a long time.


    Because nobody releases on VHS anymore. Also, there are currently no
    stand-alone VCR's in production (I know, I looked for once recently).
    They're all DVD/VHS combo units.

    That being said, I think DVD is going to be around for a long time.
    The consumer acceptance rate and durability of the media are just too
    high. Eventually, some sort of streaming HD on demand will likely
    kill the optical discs, but I think it will be a decade or two before
    it happens.

    Everybody is fond of citing all sorts of reasons for the slowdown in
    DVD sales, but I think it has mostly to do with the format being
    around for 10 years. Just about every catalog title that would sell
    has been released already, and there is a tremendous secondary market
    due to the durability of the media. Back at the height of VHS I was
    always leery of buying 2nd hand VHS, because you never knew when it
    had been owned by some clown who used butter-covered hands to shove it
    in his never-cleaned VCR. I have no such qualms about DVD because
    there are few sins Windex cannot fix. I still think people like to
    buy movies on disc, the studios just have to give them something
    worthwhile to buy.

    -beaumon
     
    , Jan 21, 2008
    #6
  7. Re: Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 19:40:44 -0800 (PST), wrote:

    > I have no such qualms about DVD because
    >there are few sins Windex cannot fix.



    That is the LAST substance you would ever want to use on an optical
    disc... any format.

    Heavily washed hands in HOT water with dish soap or any anti-bacterial
    hand soap, and then wash the disc with a freshly soaped up pair of hands.
    make all rub motions from center to edge, and rinse in water, sling off
    excess and dab dry, NOT wiping.

    THAT soap is far better at not scratching up your disc than Windex and
    ANY wipes of any kind could ever be.

    Of course, the best disc is one that has never been touched, and
    therefore would never need to be cleaned.

    Windex is the LAST product anyone should ever use on a PLASTIC optical
    surface.

    Jeez, you talk like you have been in the dark all your fucking life.
     
    MakeNoAttemptToAdjustYourSet, Jan 21, 2008
    #7
  8. Ablang

    Guest

    Re: Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    On Jan 21, 6:12 am, MakeNoAttemptToAdjustYourSet
    <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 19:40:44 -0800 (PST), wrote:
    > >  I have no such qualms about DVD because
    > >there are few sins Windex cannot fix.

    >
    >   That is the LAST substance you would ever want to use on an optical
    > disc...  any format.
    >
    >   Heavily washed hands in HOT water with dish soap or any anti-bacterial
    > hand soap, and then wash the disc with a freshly soaped up pair of hands.
    > make all rub motions from center to edge, and rinse in water, sling off
    > excess and dab dry, NOT wiping.
    >
    >   THAT soap is far better at not scratching up your disc than Windex and
    > ANY wipes of any kind could ever be.
    >
    >   Of course, the best disc is one that has never been touched, and
    > therefore would never need to be cleaned.
    >
    >  Windex is the LAST product anyone should ever use on a PLASTIC optical
    > surface.
    >
    >   Jeez, you talk like you have been in the dark all your fucking life.


    Well, it was windex or a belt sander.

    -beaumon
     
    , Jan 21, 2008
    #8
  9. Ablang

    Doug Jacobs Guest

    Re: Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    wrote:

    > The consumer acceptance rate and durability of the media are just too
    > high. Eventually, some sort of streaming HD on demand will likely
    > kill the optical discs, but I think it will be a decade or two before
    > it happens.


    I know that a lot of people think downloads are going to be the end of DVD
    or physical media, but think about it - we've had the capability to buy
    electronic versions of entire books for over a decade, yet bookstores
    aren't in any danger of closing now, are they?

    Part of the reason for this is that many people are going to want a
    physical copy of things they buy. Even with the explosion in digital music
    with things like iTunes, most people are still just ripping music from CDs
    that they own.

    Digital distribution may be fine for certain things. Rentals come to mind
    immediatly. Why wait for the mailman to bring your Netflix to you when
    you can download your movie over night?

    > Everybody is fond of citing all sorts of reasons for the slowdown in
    > DVD sales, but I think it has mostly to do with the format being
    > around for 10 years. Just about every catalog title that would sell
    > has been released already, and there is a tremendous secondary market
    > due to the durability of the media. Back at the height of VHS I was
    > always leery of buying 2nd hand VHS, because you never knew when it
    > had been owned by some clown who used butter-covered hands to shove it
    > in his never-cleaned VCR. I have no such qualms about DVD because
    > there are few sins Windex cannot fix. I still think people like to
    > buy movies on disc, the studios just have to give them something
    > worthwhile to buy.


    Oh, I can think of tons of things that haven't been yet released onto DVD
    - and probably never will be due to copyright issues...

    WKRP hasn't been fully released - and what little has been, has had to
    have the music removed from it (boo!) Music is also the reason why
    there'll never be a "proper" release of Beavis & Butthead either. Going
    along with TV shows, where's Max Headroom, and The Real Ghostbusters?
    Meanwhile, garbage like "Flava Of Love - season 2" graces the shelves of
    my local library...

    Anyways, as for why DVD sales are dropping? I can think of many reasons:

    1: Economy. It sucks right now (and has sucked for years), so folks have
    less cash to spend.

    2: Quality (of content). Do you REALLY need to *buy* every two-bit bomb?
    I know when DVD was new and shiny, folks would buy just about anything so
    they could show off their shiny new DVD player. After all, look at the
    HD-DVD and Blu-Ray fanboys arguing about how GREAT the picture looks when
    describing such hits like 'Tallegeda Nights', or 'Knocked Up'...

    3: Suckers. People are finally realizing that they've been suckered by
    companies who release the same title over and over again, each time adding
    new features and commentaries. This is practically spitting on the fans
    of that title, since they're the ones who bought the first version which
    basically looked like it was mastered from a bad VHS tape for $30, only to
    later be told about the big super-anniversary edition with properly
    remastered footage, plus extras. TV releases are particularly bad in this
    area... Sure you COULD buy Farscape season one, 1 disc at a time for $22
    each when they were first released (like I did)...and then later find Season
    One in a boxset that not only takes up less space, but only costs a fraction
    of what the individual discs did! After being bitten a few times, I stopped
    buying and instead just wait for the sales on the boxsets to occur. If it's
    something I really want to see now, there's always Netflix, which brings me
    to...

    4: Rentals. With Netflix, Blockbuster and other smaller companies, it's
    possible to get just about any DVD delivered to your door for a fraction
    of buying it. I'm sure that many of us here have titles in our libraries
    that we'd only consider watching as a rental had that option been
    available at the time.... However you feel sort of bad about trying to
    sell those movies since you know you'll only get, at most, like $5-7 for
    them. I know at the begining of the DVD era, there was an explosion in
    purchasing of DVDs in almost a rush to build a personal library. I think
    that "craze" has worn off for most people now - especially when you
    consider that most of the stuff out there just isn't good enough to be
    taking up space in your house. If you do get an urge to watch something,
    just readjust your Netflix queue, and it'll show up in a day or two.
    that's good enough for most people, I think.


    Enthusiasts will continue to pour money into their personal libraries, but
    to think that the vast majority of people will do the same with
    HD-DVD/Blu-Ray as they did with DVD is just silly. Even if people have a
    HDTV and a HD video player, it's hard to justify buying much given the points
    I mentioned above.

    --
    It's not broken. It's...advanced.
     
    Doug Jacobs, Jan 21, 2008
    #9
  10. Re: Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    Doug Jacobs wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The consumer acceptance rate and durability of the media are just too
    >>high. Eventually, some sort of streaming HD on demand will likely
    >>kill the optical discs, but I think it will be a decade or two before
    >>it happens.

    >
    >
    > I know that a lot of people think downloads are going to be the end of DVD
    > or physical media, but think about it - we've had the capability to buy
    > electronic versions of entire books for over a decade, yet bookstores
    > aren't in any danger of closing now, are they?


    In fact, Amazon's had to RE-launch electronic books for, what, the third
    time, and the public's *still* not buying them!

    (Although books aren't subject to studios' el-dorado dream of taking
    back "control" over their movies' screenings, and getting that sweet
    percentage of EVERY customer viewing--
    You'd think the curtain would finally have been ripped back on the Evil
    Master Plot after the DiVX Wars.)

    > Part of the reason for this is that many people are going to want a
    > physical copy of things they buy. Even with the explosion in digital music
    > with things like iTunes, most people are still just ripping music from CDs
    > that they own.
    >
    > Digital distribution may be fine for certain things. Rentals come to mind
    > immediatly. Why wait for the mailman to bring your Netflix to you when
    > you can download your movie over night?


    ....Um, because sometimes I rent the disc to watch the documentary?

    (Or a hi-def trailer that was supposed to be on the disk?...
    Or rented "March of the Penguins", which I was never really crazy about
    in the first place, solely for the purpose of watching the bonus-extra
    Warner Bugs Bunny cartoon mastered in 1080?)

    >>Everybody is fond of citing all sorts of reasons for the slowdown in
    >>DVD sales, but I think it has mostly to do with the format being
    >>around for 10 years.


    > Anyways, as for why DVD sales are dropping? I can think of many reasons:


    I can remember in the late-90's, when some independent anime companies
    were leery of getting into the new waters of DVD, and still put some of
    their lesser-selling niche titles out on VHS-only, to "test customer
    interest" in future disk release for the titles--And fans felt
    "blackmailed" into buying VHS tapes they knew they'd have to throw away
    in a couple of months anyway (as opposed to not buying it, and giving
    the company the wrong idea)...
    At that point in the 90's, nobody was buying *any* VHS under normal
    circumstances, PERIOD, and we fans grit our teeth and grumbled, "Making
    us buy the...Ohh, pally, you'd BETTER come through with that disk, for
    what we have to go through to keep you happy... >_< "

    ....Now update those sentiments to hi-def owners and DVD.

    Derek Janssen
     
    Derek Janssen, Jan 21, 2008
    #10
  11. Ablang

    Doug Jacobs Guest

    Re: Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    Derek Janssen <> wrote:

    > > I know that a lot of people think downloads are going to be the end of DVD
    > > or physical media, but think about it - we've had the capability to buy
    > > electronic versions of entire books for over a decade, yet bookstores
    > > aren't in any danger of closing now, are they?


    > In fact, Amazon's had to RE-launch electronic books for, what, the third
    > time, and the public's *still* not buying them!


    Yes, and this time with their own Amazon branded reader, even. I don't
    get it, really.

    > (Although books aren't subject to studios' el-dorado dream of taking
    > back "control" over their movies' screenings, and getting that sweet
    > percentage of EVERY customer viewing--
    > You'd think the curtain would finally have been ripped back on the Evil
    > Master Plot after the DiVX Wars.)


    Some companies, and the pointy-haired morons that run them, never learn.
    At least some companies learn from their own mistakes - but it seems to me
    they never learn from mistakes that other companies make. It's as if
    they're intent on making each mistak for themselves.

    > > Digital distribution may be fine for certain things. Rentals come to mind
    > > immediatly. Why wait for the mailman to bring your Netflix to you when
    > > you can download your movie over night?


    > ...Um, because sometimes I rent the disc to watch the documentary?


    I know I said movie up there, but there's really no reason you couldn't
    bundle the entire contents on a DVD into a downloadable file that still
    maintained the same menu and chapter structure a physical DVD would have...

    > > Anyways, as for why DVD sales are dropping? I can think of many reasons:


    > I can remember in the late-90's, when some independent anime companies
    > were leery of getting into the new waters of DVD, and still put some of
    > their lesser-selling niche titles out on VHS-only, to "test customer
    > interest" in future disk release for the titles--And fans felt
    > "blackmailed" into buying VHS tapes they knew they'd have to throw away
    > in a couple of months anyway (as opposed to not buying it, and giving
    > the company the wrong idea)...
    > At that point in the 90's, nobody was buying *any* VHS under normal
    > circumstances, PERIOD, and we fans grit our teeth and grumbled, "Making
    > us buy the...Ohh, pally, you'd BETTER come through with that disk, for
    > what we have to go through to keep you happy... >_< "


    > ...Now update those sentiments to hi-def owners and DVD.


    Yes, I remember those days.

    I really hope the anime DVD industry gets better, but from what I'm
    seeing, it's only getting stupider and greedier...

    Anime series are one thing I definitely won't buy until there's a complete
    boxset out.

    However, now it seems the companies are regressing - going for a more
    Japanese attitude of putting 2 or 3 episodes on a disc and then charging
    $35 (MSRP) for it. What the...? With DVD-9, shouldn't they be doing 6-8
    episodes? 7 disc series are SO 20th century! :(

    --
    It's not broken. It's...advanced.
     
    Doug Jacobs, Jan 22, 2008
    #11
  12. Ablang

    Richard C. Guest

    "Dick Sidbury" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > In article <h7Ckj.41542$>,
    > "PapaBear" <2x> wrote:
    >
    >> I've also foreseen the end to movie DVDs but believe they'll be around
    >> for
    >> awhile. I can't predict how long, but I'm betting on another 5-10 years.
    >> In
    >> the meantime it might be wise to stockpile a supply of the equipment
    >> needed
    >> to play them, like some ordinary DVD players, TVs, blank DVDs and burners
    >> (if you burn them), etc. There's no guarantee those things will be around
    >> for much longer.

    >
    > Just like video tapes and VCRs.
    >
    > dick


    ========================
    Both of which are sold everywhere.
     
    Richard C., Jan 22, 2008
    #12
  13. Re: Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    Doug Jacobs wrote:
    >
    >>In fact, Amazon's had to RE-launch electronic books for, what, the third
    >>time, and the public's *still* not buying them!

    >
    >>(Although books aren't subject to studios' el-dorado dream of taking
    >>back "control" over their movies' screenings, and getting that sweet
    >>percentage of EVERY customer viewing--
    >>You'd think the curtain would finally have been ripped back on the Evil
    >>Master Plot after the DiVX Wars.)

    >
    > Some companies, and the pointy-haired morons that run them, never learn.
    > At least some companies learn from their own mistakes - but it seems to me
    > they never learn from mistakes that other companies make. It's as if
    > they're intent on making each mistak for themselves.


    Well, that's just it--The studios don't want to give up their "WE own
    the movies, not you" pipe dream, no matter what technology comes or goes
    over the decades:

    To keep the "El dorado" metaphor going, that's why there wasn't just
    *one* conquistador in South America...They kept coming!
    The gold HAD to be there! They just didn't LOOK hard enough! Sooner or
    later, they'd find a tribe that would be happy enough to GIVE it to them!

    >>...Um, because sometimes I rent the disc to watch the documentary?

    >
    > I know I said movie up there, but there's really no reason you couldn't
    > bundle the entire contents on a DVD into a downloadable file that still
    > maintained the same menu and chapter structure a physical DVD would have...


    Again, that's where you run up against the big hard wall that's built
    out of the cement found in studio execs' heads:
    They think we just want to sit down and see the movie because we're,
    quote, "too lazy to go to Blockbuster"--I mean, like, "Pirates 3" was a
    big hit in theaters, 'n stuff!...Uh, wasn't it?

    (Which mentality might've played during the days of VHS and cable PPV,
    back when we did just "want to see the movie", and never even realized
    there *were* other things to watch about our favorite movie than just
    the darn movie--
    But it's a different world now, and we've gotten too hooked on the idea
    of "Owning" every single thing about the movie, in the sense of "Pwning"
    it...)

    >>>Anyways, as for why DVD sales are dropping? I can think of many reasons:

    >
    >>I can remember in the late-90's, when some independent anime companies
    >>were leery of getting into the new waters of DVD, and still put some of
    >>their new lesser-selling niche titles out on VHS-only, to "test customer
    >>interest" in future disk release for the titles--And fans felt
    >>"blackmailed" into buying VHS tapes they knew they'd have to throw away
    >>in a couple of months anyway (as opposed to not buying it, and giving
    >>the company the wrong idea)...
    >>At that point in the 90's, nobody was buying *any* VHS under normal
    >>circumstances, PERIOD, and we fans grit our teeth and grumbled, "Making
    >>us buy the...Ohh, pally, you'd BETTER come through with that disk, for
    >>what we have to go through to keep you happy... >_< "

    >
    >>...Now update those sentiments to hi-def owners and DVD.

    >
    > Yes, I remember those days.
    >
    > I really hope the anime DVD industry gets better, but from what I'm
    > seeing, it's only getting stupider and greedier...


    Er, I believe I was referring to the DVD audience-acceptance factor* at
    which we as viewers had reached the point of "VHS?...Freakin' crap, why
    don't you just CARVE THE MOVIE ON A PYRAMID??"
    And anything that didn't recognize the saturation of the new format was
    now a *liability* for the company that had to drag its audiences in
    screaming and cursing, unless absolutely necessary as a force of sales
    negotiation--
    Sorta like the Matrix DVD, in REVERSE. -_-

    Now, as to the question of why people aren't buying DVD's these last few
    months, in the face of an increasingly resolved hi-def format that
    they're only just now learning about...

    Derek Janssen

    ----
    [1 - And only using "anime" as a note back to how that particular
    viewership had embraced subtitles, audio tracks, TV-episode chapter
    selection, and indestructible media long before any other branch of the
    mainstream audience...
    Let p0rn claim what it wants, it was the anime fans who FIRST wanted DVD
    to wipe those big bulky rewindy things off the face of existence.]
     
    Derek Janssen, Jan 22, 2008
    #13
  14. Ablang

    Phisherman Guest

    Re: Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 13:12:36 -0800 (PST),
    wrote:

    >On Jan 21, 6:12 am, MakeNoAttemptToAdjustYourSet
    ><> wrote:
    >> On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 19:40:44 -0800 (PST), wrote:
    >> >  I have no such qualms about DVD because
    >> >there are few sins Windex cannot fix.

    >>
    >>   That is the LAST substance you would ever want to use on an optical
    >> disc...  any format.
    >>
    >>   Heavily washed hands in HOT water with dish soap or any anti-bacterial
    >> hand soap, and then wash the disc with a freshly soaped up pair of hands.
    >> make all rub motions from center to edge, and rinse in water, sling off
    >> excess and dab dry, NOT wiping.
    >>
    >>   THAT soap is far better at not scratching up your disc than Windex and
    >> ANY wipes of any kind could ever be.
    >>
    >>   Of course, the best disc is one that has never been touched, and
    >> therefore would never need to be cleaned.
    >>
    >>  Windex is the LAST product anyone should ever use on a PLASTIC optical
    >> surface.
    >>
    >>   Jeez, you talk like you have been in the dark all your phucking life.

    >
    >Well, it was windex or a belt sander.
    >
    >-beaumon


    Brasso worked on a rented Cinderella DVD and it finally played OK. It
    looked like a kid used it in the sandbox.
     
    Phisherman, Jan 22, 2008
    #14
  15. PapaBear wrote:

    > I've also foreseen the end to movie DVDs but believe they'll be around for
    > awhile. I can't predict how long, but I'm betting on another 5-10 years. In
    > the meantime it might be wise to stockpile a supply of the equipment needed
    > to play them, like some ordinary DVD players, TVs, blank DVDs and burners
    > (if you burn them), etc. There's no guarantee those things will be around
    > for much longer.


    As I seem to remember, the idea of offering pre-recorded movies on VHS
    tape was first started by an independent company back in 1980, as it was
    already understood that most early-adopters who owned the first
    recordable tape machines were using their first "big" tape-practice
    to....tape movies off of TV. (Usually "2001".)

    ....Owning movies on a permanent living-room shelf is TRIBAL.
    You can't fight what's in our DNA. :)

    Derek Janssen (it's like selling a subway train in California)
     
    Derek Janssen, Jan 22, 2008
    #15
  16. Re: Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 13:12:36 -0800 (PST), wrote:

    >On Jan 21, 6:12 am, MakeNoAttemptToAdjustYourSet
    ><> wrote:
    >> On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 19:40:44 -0800 (PST), wrote:
    >> >  I have no such qualms about DVD because
    >> >there are few sins Windex cannot fix.

    >>
    >>   That is the LAST substance you would ever want to use on an optical
    >> disc...  any format.
    >>
    >>   Heavily washed hands in HOT water with dish soap or any anti-bacterial
    >> hand soap, and then wash the disc with a freshly soaped up pair of hands.
    >> make all rub motions from center to edge, and rinse in water, sling off
    >> excess and dab dry, NOT wiping.
    >>
    >>   THAT soap is far better at not scratching up your disc than Windex and
    >> ANY wipes of any kind could ever be.
    >>
    >>   Of course, the best disc is one that has never been touched, and
    >> therefore would never need to be cleaned.
    >>
    >>  Windex is the LAST product anyone should ever use on a PLASTIC optical
    >> surface.
    >>
    >>   Jeez, you talk like you have been in the dark all your fucking life.

    >
    >Well, it was windex or a belt sander.
    >



    To plastic... Windex IS a belt sander.
     
    MakeNoAttemptToAdjustYourSet, Jan 22, 2008
    #16
  17. Re: Bits from Bill: Death to the DVD Disc is Coming

    On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 21:56:57 -0500, Phisherman <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 21 Jan 2008 13:12:36 -0800 (PST),
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Jan 21, 6:12 am, MakeNoAttemptToAdjustYourSet
    >><> wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 19:40:44 -0800 (PST), wrote:
    >>> >  I have no such qualms about DVD because
    >>> >there are few sins Windex cannot fix.
    >>>
    >>>   That is the LAST substance you would ever want to use on an optical
    >>> disc...  any format.
    >>>
    >>>   Heavily washed hands in HOT water with dish soap or any anti-bacterial
    >>> hand soap, and then wash the disc with a freshly soaped up pair of hands.
    >>> make all rub motions from center to edge, and rinse in water, sling off
    >>> excess and dab dry, NOT wiping.
    >>>
    >>>   THAT soap is far better at not scratching up your disc than Windex and
    >>> ANY wipes of any kind could ever be.
    >>>
    >>>   Of course, the best disc is one that has never been touched, and
    >>> therefore would never need to be cleaned.
    >>>
    >>>  Windex is the LAST product anyone should ever use on a PLASTIC optical
    >>> surface.
    >>>
    >>>   Jeez, you talk like you have been in the dark all your phucking life.

    >>
    >>Well, it was windex or a belt sander.
    >>
    >>-beaumon

    >
    >Brasso worked on a rented Cinderella DVD and it finally played OK. It
    >looked like a kid used it in the sandbox.


    There is a big difference between cleaning a grimy disk, and using an
    abrasive media to re-finish the optical surface of one.

    Two entirely different tasks, they are.
     
    MakeNoAttemptToAdjustYourSet, Jan 22, 2008
    #17
  18. Ablang

    Bill Guest


    >
    > As I seem to remember, the idea of offering pre-recorded movies on VHS
    > tape was first started by an independent company back in 1980, as it was
    > already understood that most early-adopters who owned the first
    > recordable tape machines were using their first "big" tape-practice
    > to....tape movies off of TV. (Usually "2001".)
    >


    The company was Magnetic Video. Their initial catalog consisted of at
    least 50 titles from 20th Century Fox, including "The Sound of Music."
    Their first releases though, if I remember correctly, were in the Beta
    format, in the late 70s.

    The notion of offering movies and other such programming to the average
    consumer was there before this endeavor, however. One casualty of the
    home video revolution in the early to mid 70s was a non-recordable
    format from Columbia called EVR. It utilized a film cassette, and
    playback equipment containing a flying spot scanner that converted the
    image into a standard NTSC signal. Also, work on what was to become the
    Laser Disc was already underway in the early 70s.
     
    Bill, Jan 22, 2008
    #18
  19. Ablang

    Richard C. Guest

    "Bill" <> wrote in message
    news:fBrlj.13535$...
    > Also, work on what was to become the Laser Disc was already underway in
    > the early 70s.


    =================================
    Actually, LD was developed long before VHS.
    Sales of commercial LDS and players started in 1977.
     
    Richard C., Jan 22, 2008
    #19
  20. Ablang

    Bill Guest

    Richard C. wrote:
    > "Bill" <> wrote in message
    > news:fBrlj.13535$...
    >> Also, work on what was to become the Laser Disc was already underway
    >> in the early 70s.

    >
    > =================================
    > Actually, LD was developed long before VHS.
    > Sales of commercial LDS and players started in 1977.


    I remember quite well, even though I wasn't in the test market area
    (Atlanta?). In 1972, during my senior year in high school, I remember
    writing a research paper on the emerging home video revolution. I found
    magazine articles, at the time, about work being done on the laserdisc
    format, as well as articles mentioning Cartrivision, Columbia's EVR
    system, and an early RCA effort utilizing what they referred to as
    Holotape. The laserdisc was, by far, the most intriguing of the concepts.
     
    Bill, Jan 22, 2008
    #20
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