binary to decimal

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by anOLDun, Mar 9, 2006.

  1. anOLDun

    anOLDun Guest

    Hi

    trying to convert a binary set of " numbers" to decimal.

    The binary is to be read verticaly - when converted the numbers will
    represent a "digital" time i.e. hh/mm/ss

    this is the binary:


    0 1 0
    0 1 0 1
    0 0 0 0 1
    1 0 0 0 0

    Can someone give me the digital numbers? - tried looking for a conversation
    calculator but all i can find it a "method" showing how to do it. but it
    talks about intergers, powers of 2, running and weight. When i left school
    we were using an "abacus", chalk and slate.

    Help will be much appreciated

    cheers

    D
    anOLDun, Mar 9, 2006
    #1
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  2. X-No-Archive: YES
    anOLDun [] has entered into testimony


    > Hi
    >
    > trying to convert a binary set of " numbers" to decimal.
    >
    > The binary is to be read verticaly - when converted the numbers will
    > represent a "digital" time i.e. hh/mm/ss
    >
    > this is the binary:
    >
    >
    > 0 1 0
    > 0 1 0 1
    > 0 0 0 0 1
    > 1 0 0 0 0
    >
    > Can someone give me the digital numbers? - tried looking for a
    > conversation calculator but all i can find it a "method" showing how
    > to do it. but it talks about intergers, powers of 2, running and
    > weight. When i left school we were using an "abacus", chalk and slate.
    >
    > Help will be much appreciated
    >
    > cheers
    >
    > D


    Try not to make the same post 3 times within minutes. Impatience is not
    a virtue.

    --

    Skepticult® Member# 581-00504-208
    ChadwickStone at Gmail dot com
    Usenet's most helpful netizen
    Hammer of Thor, March 2005
    Chadwick Stone©, Mar 9, 2006
    #2
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  3. anOLDun

    Duane Arnold Guest

    Re: Who is Chad-ett Stone Hogwash???

    :)
    Duane Arnold, Mar 9, 2006
    #3
  4. anOLDun

    Frosty Guest

    What trick, what device, what starting-hole on Thu, 9 Mar 2006
    12:00:22 -0000, canst thou now find out, to hide "anOLDun"
    <> from this open and apparent shame?:

    >Hi
    >
    >trying to convert a binary set of " numbers" to decimal.
    >
    >The binary is to be read verticaly - when converted the numbers will
    >represent a "digital" time i.e. hh/mm/ss
    >
    >this is the binary:
    >
    >
    > 0 1 0
    > 0 1 0 1
    > 0 0 0 0 1
    > 1 0 0 0 0
    >
    >Can someone give me the digital numbers? - tried looking for a

    conversation
    >calculator but all i can find it a "method" showing how to do it. but

    it
    >talks about intergers, powers of 2, running and weight. When i left

    school
    >we were using an "abacus", chalk and slate.
    >
    >Help will be much appreciated
    >
    >cheers
    >
    >D
    >

    There's an echo in here.
    --

    Turn off that damned internet!
    http://www.turnofftheinternet.com/
    Frosty, Mar 9, 2006
    #4
  5. anOLDun

    me Guest

    "Frosty" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What trick, what device, what starting-hole on Thu, 9 Mar 2006
    > 12:00:22 -0000, canst thou now find out, to hide "anOLDun"
    > <> from this open and apparent shame?:
    >
    >>Hi
    >>
    >>trying to convert a binary set of " numbers" to decimal.
    >>
    >>The binary is to be read verticaly - when converted the numbers will
    >>represent a "digital" time i.e. hh/mm/ss
    >>
    >>this is the binary:
    >>
    >>
    >> 0 1 0
    >> 0 1 0 1
    >> 0 0 0 0 1
    >> 1 0 0 0 0
    >>
    >>Can someone give me the digital numbers? - tried looking for a

    > conversation
    >>calculator but all i can find it a "method" showing how to do it. but

    > it
    >>talks about intergers, powers of 2, running and weight. When i left

    > school
    >>we were using an "abacus", chalk and slate.
    >>
    >>Help will be much appreciated
    >>
    >>cheers
    >>
    >>D
    >>

    > There's an echo in here.
    > --


    An echo in here ?
    me, Mar 10, 2006
    #5
  6. anOLDun wrote:

    > trying to convert a binary set of " numbers" to decimal.
    >
    > The binary is to be read verticaly - when converted the numbers will
    > represent a "digital" time i.e. hh/mm/ss
    >
    > this is the binary:
    >
    >
    > 0 1 0
    > 0 1 0 1
    > 0 0 0 0 1
    > 1 0 0 0 0
    >


    I got my buddy a clock a couple Christmases ago that has that arrangement
    of blue LEDs and displays time with

    1 = lit
    0 = dark

    It's a trip! And it's fun. :)

    http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/59e0/


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    Coming Soon: Filter rules specific to various real news clients
    Blinky the Shark, Mar 10, 2006
    #6
  7. anOLDun

    anOLDun Guest

    Well it's not me......not me......me.......m

    Not sure what happened - message said it was sending it ...it was taking
    ages. I waitied about a minute so i shut down Outlook express and then tried
    again - samething again so i just left it and went off to other stuff -next
    time i looked it had sent both - aaaaaaaagghhhhh

    Sorry
    :-(

    D
    "me" <> wrote in message news:iV3Qf.8200$z82.1653@fed1read07...
    >
    > "Frosty" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > What trick, what device, what starting-hole on Thu, 9 Mar 2006
    > > 12:00:22 -0000, canst thou now find out, to hide "anOLDun"
    > > <> from this open and apparent shame?:
    > >
    > >>Hi
    > >>
    > >>trying to convert a binary set of " numbers" to decimal.
    > >>
    > >>The binary is to be read verticaly - when converted the numbers will
    > >>represent a "digital" time i.e. hh/mm/ss
    > >>
    > >>this is the binary:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> 0 1 0
    > >> 0 1 0 1
    > >> 0 0 0 0 1
    > >> 1 0 0 0 0
    > >>
    > >>Can someone give me the digital numbers? - tried looking for a

    > > conversation
    > >>calculator but all i can find it a "method" showing how to do it. but

    > > it
    > >>talks about intergers, powers of 2, running and weight. When i left

    > > school
    > >>we were using an "abacus", chalk and slate.
    > >>
    > >>Help will be much appreciated
    > >>
    > >>cheers
    > >>
    > >>D
    > >>

    > > There's an echo in here.
    > > --

    >
    > An echo in here ?
    >
    >
    >
    anOLDun, Mar 11, 2006
    #7
  8. anOLDun

    Mike Easter Guest

    Blinky the Shark wrote:
    > anOLDun wrote:
    >
    >> trying to convert a binary set of " numbers" to decimal.
    >>
    >> The binary is to be read verticaly - when converted the numbers will
    >> represent a "digital" time i.e. hh/mm/ss
    >>
    >> this is the binary:
    >>
    >>
    >> 0 1 0
    >> 0 1 0 1
    >> 0 0 0 0 1
    >> 1 0 0 0 0
    >>

    >
    > I got my buddy a clock a couple Christmases ago that has that
    > arrangement of blue LEDs and displays time with
    >
    > 1 = lit
    > 0 = dark
    >
    > It's a trip! And it's fun. :)
    >
    > http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/59e0/


    But the initial configuration the OP posted is [slightly] wrong, which
    in 'math' we call wrong.

    It is missing the 5th vertical column [for the seconds more than 15].
    It should be

    0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0 0
    0 0 0 0 0 0

    <use monospace font for columns>

    so that the last 2 vertical columns on the R are seconds, the middle 2
    minutes and the first two on the L hours.

    Then, the bottom row would be 1, the 2nd 2, the 3rd 4, and the top 8.
    The minutes and seconds need to be able to go to 00-59 and the hours
    need to go 00-23

    --
    Mike Easter
    Mike Easter, Mar 11, 2006
    #8
  9. anOLDun

    Mike Easter Guest

    Mike Easter wrote:
    > Blinky the Shark wrote:


    >> I got my buddy a clock a couple Christmases ago that has that
    >> arrangement of blue LEDs and displays time with
    >>
    >> 1 = lit
    >> 0 = dark
    >>
    >> It's a trip! And it's fun. :)
    >>
    >> http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/59e0/

    >
    >
    > 0 0 0
    > 0 0 0 0 0
    > 0 0 0 0 0 0
    > 0 0 0 0 0 0
    >
    > <use monospace font for columns>
    >
    > so that the last 2 vertical columns on the R are seconds, the middle 2
    > minutes and the first two on the L hours.
    >
    > Then, the bottom row would be 1, the 2nd 2, the 3rd 4, and the top 8.
    > The minutes and seconds need to be able to go to 00-59 and the hours
    > need to go 00-23


    But the thinkgeek clock as depicted didn't use the most efficient binary
    configuration, in terms of the number of lights, because they wanted a
    column of lights for every decimal clock 'digit' or numeral space.

    If they had stacked up the light columns vertically 6 high to 32 in the
    hours and minutes and 5 high to 16 in the hours, they could've gotten
    away with 3 less lights.


    0 0
    0 0 0
    0 0 0
    0 0 0
    0 0 0
    0 0 0

    <use monospace font for columns>

    The thinkgeek configuration requires 20 lights, this one just needs 17.
    In this config, the 3 columns are hours, minutes, seconds.

    Or stated another way, you only need 6 places for binary digits to make
    59, and only 5 places to make 23.

    --
    Mike Easter
    Mike Easter, Mar 11, 2006
    #9
  10. anOLDun

    Mike Easter Guest

    Mike Easter misspoke:

    > If they had stacked up the light columns vertically 6 high to 32 in
    > the hours and minutes and 5 high to 16 in the hours, they could've
    > gotten away with 3 less lights.


    He/I meant

    If they had stacked up the light columns vertically 6 high to 32 in the
    /seconds/ and minutes and 5 high to 16 in the hours, they could've
    gotten away with 3 less lights.

    --
    Mike Easter
    Mike Easter, Mar 11, 2006
    #10
  11. anOLDun

    fred-bloggs Guest

    "Mike Easter" <> wrote in news:441288ca$0$37873
    $:

    > Mike Easter misspoke:
    >
    >> If they had stacked up the light columns vertically 6 high to 32 in
    >> the hours and minutes and 5 high to 16 in the hours, they could've
    >> gotten away with 3 less lights.

    >
    > He/I meant
    >
    > If they had stacked up the light columns vertically 6 high to 32 in the
    > /seconds/ and minutes and 5 high to 16 in the hours, they could've
    > gotten away with 3 less lights.
    >


    I think that's what
    http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/59e0/
    means by *true-binary* display. The top led in each of the short columns
    would not get lit.

    The normal (Powers of Two) mode is what I would call binary-coded-
    decimal, each column showing the binary equivalent of a decimal digit.
    In a non-geek clock, each BCD digit would be normally be converted into a
    7 segment LCD display looking vaguely like

    - - - - - -
    | | | | | | | | | | | |
    - - : - - : - -
    | | | | | | | | | | | |
    - - - - - -


    or 42 lights, even LESS efficient, but much more readable.


    --
    fred
    fred-bloggs, Mar 11, 2006
    #11
  12. anOLDun

    Leythos Guest

    In article <44133648$0$76750$>,
    says...
    > "Mike Easter" <> wrote in news:441288ca$0$37873
    > $:
    >
    > > Mike Easter misspoke:
    > >
    > >> If they had stacked up the light columns vertically 6 high to 32 in
    > >> the hours and minutes and 5 high to 16 in the hours, they could've
    > >> gotten away with 3 less lights.

    > >
    > > He/I meant
    > >
    > > If they had stacked up the light columns vertically 6 high to 32 in the
    > > /seconds/ and minutes and 5 high to 16 in the hours, they could've
    > > gotten away with 3 less lights.
    > >

    >
    > I think that's what
    > http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/59e0/
    > means by *true-binary* display. The top led in each of the short columns
    > would not get lit.
    >
    > The normal (Powers of Two) mode is what I would call binary-coded-
    > decimal, each column showing the binary equivalent of a decimal digit.
    > In a non-geek clock, each BCD digit would be normally be converted into a
    > 7 segment LCD display looking vaguely like
    >
    > - - - - - -
    > | | | | | | | | | | | |
    > - - : - - : - -
    > | | | | | | | | | | | |
    > - - - - - -
    >
    >
    > or 42 lights, even LESS efficient, but much more readable.


    One could also do it in ASCII with 28 LED's, or Decimal with 28 LED's -
    that's the number of LED's in a 7-segment display you would need.

    http://www.wharton.co.uk/digital_clocks/401_020.htm

    There is also a way to show the time/date/text with just 7 LED's, using
    a swinging arm and strobing the LED's based on position so that they
    appear to be a banner.

    http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/59ac/

    Most Binary clocks, for a long time, have always done the
    -8 -8
    -4 44
    22 22
    11:11
    medthod, some included seconds, but not many.


    --


    remove 999 in order to email me
    Leythos, Mar 11, 2006
    #12
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