Biking and Photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by fleemo17@comcast.net, Feb 4, 2008.

  1. Guest

    I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?
    , Feb 4, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. John Navas Guest

    On Mon, 4 Feb 2008 12:51:40 -0800 (PST), wrote in
    <>:

    >I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    >and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    >photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    >with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    >access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    >it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    >Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    When I carried my SLR on a bike I used a padded Tamrack case on my belt.
    I sometimes carried a very light tripod bungied to the handlebars.
    These days I use a compact digital in my jacket pocket.

    --
    Best regards,
    John Navas
    Panasonic DMC-FZ8 (and several others)
    John Navas, Feb 4, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Neil Ellwood Guest

    On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 12:51:40 -0800, fleemo17 wrote:

    > I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    > and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    > photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out with
    > their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera access,
    > or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to it? Can
    > tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much? Any advice
    > on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    I use a 'Tamrac velocity 9x' bag. It goes over the head with one arm
    through the carry strap and is worn on the back with a waist strap taking
    the weight, it cannot be too hard as i manage quite easily (I am 75).
    Vibration is a problem perceived by yours truly if carried on the bike.

    --
    Neil
    reverse ra and delete l
    Linux user 335851
    Neil Ellwood, Feb 4, 2008
    #3
  4. dicko Guest

    On Mon, 4 Feb 2008 12:51:40 -0800 (PST), wrote:

    >I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    >and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    >photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    >with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    >access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    >it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    >Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    I carry my 5D in a rack mounted pack. There's just one problem with
    it, with all the bouncing around, there's a significant amount of
    vibration. I've scuffed the LCD screen with it rubbing against the
    pack wall so pack it well.

    I wouldnt consider carrying it on my body. That would cause some
    signficant damage to you should you fall and land on it.

    I've also velcroed/bungied a tripod to the rear rack too.

    -dickm
    dicko, Feb 4, 2008
    #4
  5. ray Guest

    On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 12:51:40 -0800, fleemo17 wrote:

    > I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    > and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    > photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out with
    > their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera access,
    > or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to it? Can
    > tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much? Any advice
    > on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    I put my Kodak P850 in my fanny pack, and away I go. Have all I need, no
    extra lenses, etc. just the 12x zoom. Usually carry 4gb of SD cards and
    an extra battery too.
    ray, Feb 4, 2008
    #5
  6. Jufi Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    > and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    > photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    > with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    > access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    > it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    > Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    I've learned never to carry a camera in a bike pack on a mountain bike. Too
    much shaking. Use either a belt pack or a small back pack and put the camera
    in a pouch.
    Jufi, Feb 4, 2008
    #6
  7. Paul Furman Guest

    Neil Ellwood wrote:
    > On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 12:51:40 -0800, fleemo17 wrote:
    >
    >> I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    >> and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    >> photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out with
    >> their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera access,
    >> or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to it? Can
    >> tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much? Any advice
    >> on biking and photography you'd care to share?

    >
    > I use a 'Tamrac velocity 9x' bag. It goes over the head with one arm
    > through the carry strap and is worn on the back with a waist strap taking
    > the weight, it cannot be too hard as i manage quite easily (I am 75).


    AKA Bike messenger bag (sort of).

    OT fun bike messenger video when I googled:
    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=nR2ygFn-yR8

    > Vibration is a problem perceived by yours truly if carried on the bike.
    >
    Paul Furman, Feb 4, 2008
    #7
  8. Eric Miller Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    > and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    > photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    > with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    > access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    > it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    > Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?
    >


    I have used a holster case attached to my chest. I worked pretty well with
    at 70-200 f/2.8 on my 10D, but I haven't used it that way very extensively;
    only for one triathlon that I photographed several years ago. Tamrac and
    Lowepro holster style cases come with straps for carrying in the chest
    position. This won't help for the tripod.

    Eric Miller
    www.dyesscreek.com
    Eric Miller, Feb 4, 2008
    #8
  9. acl Guest

    On Feb 4, 11:51 pm, wrote:
    > I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    > and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    > photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    > with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    > access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    > it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    > Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    I cycle to work and back daily, and always carry at least a camera and
    a lens. I use either a crumpler bag or a lowepro rucksack, depending
    on whether I just take a camera only (plus perhaps another lens) or if
    I want to carry a lot of stuff (6 lenses and maybe tripod-this means
    the lowepro). However, all this is mostly on city roads, and I am used
    to carrying heavyish loads (I usually also have a laptop, sometimes
    even two, a couple of paper notebooks, and a very thick book in my
    panniers, as well as whatever books I'm currently using); it may not
    be ideal offroad.

    If possible I'd carry it on my body (rucksack or something else) so
    that it's cushioned from vibrations, jolts etc. It may help with
    falls, too (carrying my gear in the lowepro saved it once when a car
    hit me-of course luck plays a role too).
    acl, Feb 4, 2008
    #9
  10. Per :
    >I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    >and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    >photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    >with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    >access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    >it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    >Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    My instinct would be to get a second camera - maybe a
    medium-to-high-end P&S like Cannon's PowerShot sx100 (which I
    just got for my wife...) and carry it in a hip pack, sling sack,
    or messenger bag.

    Problem I see with an SLR (I've got a D70) is that in a sling
    sack, hip pack, or messenger bag, you *really* don't want to fall
    on the thing. OTOH in any sort of bike-mounted carrier, the
    camera's going to get damaged long-term from the beating it takes
    as the bike goes over bumps.
    --
    PeteCresswell
    (PeteCresswell), Feb 5, 2008
    #10
  11. jean Guest

    <> a écrit dans le message de news:
    ...
    > I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    > and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    > photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    > with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    > access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    > it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    > Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    I have a ToPeak quick release pack mounted on their own rear rack. It is
    somewhat padded and seems to protect my gear so far. I can stuff a 40D with
    a 28mm f1.8 as well as a 70-200 f4 L or the 40D with only a 24-105 f4 L IS.
    The only problem I have seen so far is the serial number has been erased
    from the bottome of the camera. For a tripod, think about a clamp like the
    Manfrotto 035 clamp with a ball head like the Manfrotto 484RC2, you can even
    use your bicycle as a camera support with these. My "lightweight" combo
    though is a Canon 400XTi with a 24-105 f4 L IS, saves a few ounces over the
    40D and still takes great pictures.

    Jean



    http://www.manfrotto.com/Jahia/site/manfrotto/pid/2718
    http://www.manfrotto.com/Jahia/site/manfrotto/cache/offonce/pid/2302
    jean, Feb 5, 2008
    #11
  12. Guest

    On Feb 4, 3:51 pm, wrote:
    > I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    > and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    > photography.  I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    > with their gear.  Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    > access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    > it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    > Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    For biking I agree with all of the others about too much vibration on
    the bike so a backpack is the only way to go. For a biking tripod you
    might want to look at the Cullman Magic II It will easily fit into a
    small pack. The Magic II is a fine lightweight tripod if the center
    post is not extended beyond a small amount. A right angle viewfinder
    helps a lot there. The Magic II also makes up into a full length
    monopod. Hang you backpack on the tripod for extra stability.
    , Feb 5, 2008
    #12
  13. Martin Brown Guest

    In message
    <>,
    writes
    >I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    >and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    >photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    >with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    >access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    >it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    >Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    I would recommend using an almost sacrificial compact or semi-compact
    camera for cycling. Panier contents get some hammer when you are on
    rough ground. That said I have taken old film SLRs cycling, but I am not
    sure I would want to subject my new DSLR to that sort of mechanical
    abuse.

    A bubble wrap bag and a sweat shirt underneath is enough to cushion all
    but the worst shocks.

    One that does macro is useful as is a half decent zoom lens. I am
    tempted by the Panasonic Z3 as my faithful old Ixus is getting a bit
    long in the tooth (the latter has survived one emergency stop at 70mph
    where it bounced around the interior of a car). Otherwise I'd probably
    buy another Ixus but the extra zoom on the Z3 is so tempting (and its
    macro is good).

    Regards,.
    --
    Martin Brown

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
    Martin Brown, Feb 5, 2008
    #13
  14. tomm42 Guest

    On Feb 4, 3:51 pm, wrote:
    > I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    > and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    > photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    > with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    > access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    > it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    > Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?



    I use a Cannondale handlebar pack, have had it for years. Soft bottom
    to absorb shocks, heavy nylon with an interior frame. Use my Domke
    inserts in the pack, or a small Tamrac case, quick release so I can
    carry it as camera case off the bike. Messed up a Leica, and myself,
    with a backpack when a new bike's rear wheel collapsed on me. Both the
    camera and I were fixable luckily. Nothing would happened in the
    handle bar pack.

    Tom
    tomm42, Feb 5, 2008
    #14
  15. Kirby Guest

    For bike trips I use a handlebar bag containing a Fuji S6500. This is
    a relatively lightweight camera with a 28-300 mm lens.
    I use an AGU bag which is secured using a Klick-fix mounting which
    allows you to quickly detach the bag to go into cafes, etc.
    The padded bag has room for the camera plus passport and money.

    See set-up and photos at http://www.lkjh.biz/bike/tuscany/south/buonconvento/index.html#t7189

    Kirby
    Kirby, Feb 5, 2008
    #15
  16. I travel light and use a fanny pack.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia 's Muire duit



    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    > and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    > photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    > with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    > access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    > it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    > Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?
    Joseph Meehan, Feb 5, 2008
    #16
  17. Ryan Robbins Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm just getting into digital photography with a new DSLR (Nikon D40x)
    > and would like to take my camera out on the bike path for some nature
    > photography. I'm curious as to how other photographers venture out
    > with their gear. Do you recommend a handlebar pack for easy camera
    > access, or perhaps a rear bike rack so a tripod could be bungied to
    > it? Can tripods be taken along without getting in the way too much?
    > Any advice on biking and photography you'd care to share?


    I use Lowepro's Mini-Trekker Classic backpack. I can carry two bodies, a
    24-70 mm f/2.8 zoom, 70-200 mm f/2.8 zoom, flash, camcorder, field audio
    recorder, notebook, game callers, flashlight, batteries, monopod. Fully
    loaded, it weighs about 25 pounds. I take it everywhere: deep forest, up
    mountains, etc.
    Ryan Robbins, Feb 5, 2008
    #17
  18. Guest

    Wow, a wealth of information and ideas! Many thanks to all who threw
    in their two cents. I really appreciate you takin' the time.
    , Feb 7, 2008
    #18
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Eigenvector

    Digital cameras and high speed photography

    Eigenvector, Aug 4, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    938
    Grunty Grogan
    Aug 4, 2003
  2. Patzt
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    292
    Patzt
    Aug 14, 2005
  3. Replies:
    3
    Views:
    636
  4. PixelPix
    Replies:
    19
    Views:
    742
  5. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    407
Loading...

Share This Page