Beyond the Office [Digital Video Tips: Best Ways to Share Videos - 12/20/2005]

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Ablang, Dec 21, 2005.

  1. Ablang

    Ablang Guest

    December 20th, 2005

    Digital Video Tips: Best Ways to Share Videos

    PC World Contributor Richard Baguley

    Whether they capture your daughter's first birthday party or your
    latest assault on the twin peaks of Kilimanjaro, videos are for
    sharing. These tips will help you keep your audience's attention as
    they view the show on the Web or play it from a DVD.

    Read "Mastering DVDs" for tips on using Adobe Premiere Elements to
    produce a DVD:
    http://www.pcworld.com/howto/article/0,aid,122100,tk,box,00.asp

    Film a lot, but edit down: When you are having your adventures, shoot
    as much video as you can. When you get home, edit it down to the
    scenes you really want to show people. Your audience won't be
    interested in your entire 45-minute cruise around San Francisco Bay,
    but they will want to see a minute or so of the Golden Gate Bridge,
    Alcatraz, and Sausalito.

    Use credits for the details: Instead of sticking the trip itinerary at
    the start of the video, position it at the end (much the way studios
    append the credits on movies and TV shows). That way, viewers who
    aren't interested can skip that info.

    Play It on the Web

    Pick the right format: Before you can put your video on the Web, you
    must do some serious compressing. A good video editing program will
    let you squish the videos and convert them to the right Web format:
    Windows Media (.wmv), QuickTime (.mov), or Flash (.swf). Your video
    editor should offer presets for various connections, too; pick a slow
    frame rate and/or a small playback window size, unless you're certain
    that viewers will be using broadband connections. Microsoft's free
    Windows Movie Maker video editing program for Windows XP will
    automatically encode the video and upload it to a video-hosting
    service such as Neptune MediaShare (starting at $59 per year with
    150MB of storage; free three-day trial) or MyDeo (starting at $5 per
    minute of video and 200 views). Note that Neptune MediaShare requires
    using the Internet Explorer browser.

    You can download Windows Movie Maker from us:
    http://www.pcworld.com/downloads/file_description/0,fid,22893,tk,box,00.asp

    Neptune MediaShare:
    http://www.neptune.com/

    MyDeo:
    http://www.mydeo.com/

    Host your video on the Web for free: Several Web sites will compress
    and host your video for free after you register, letting anyone with a
    Web browser watch it. YouTube, Ourmedia, and Google Video are among
    such sites.

    YouTube:
    http://www.youtube.com/

    Ourmedia:
    http://www.ourmedia.org/

    Google Video:
    http://video.google.com/

    Send video by e-mail: Windows Movie Maker lets you compress video so
    that it won't overload the recipient's inbox: Select Send in e-mail on
    the program's Finish Movie menu, and follow the prompts to compress
    your video and attach it to an e-mail message. For more, visit
    Microsoft's Movie Maker tutorial:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/moviemaker/videos/share.mspx

    Put It on DVD

    Use chapters for navigation: Some video editing programs (not Windows
    Movie Maker, though) let you organize your home movies into chapters
    like those commercial DVDs use to help viewers find a particular scene
    in a movie. Simply put a chapter pointer in the video as you edit it:
    In Ulead's $50 DVD MovieFactory, for instance, you can add chapters
    either manually at specific points or automatically with the program's
    scene detection feature; visit the PC World Product Finder for pricing
    and availability:
    http://pcworld.pricegrabber.com/search_getprod.php/masterid=12196660/tk=box

    For more on making chapters, plus other editing tips, read "Give Your
    Videos the Hollywood Treatment":
    http://www.pcworld.com/howto/article/0,aid,118523,tk,box,00.asp

    Use a still frame in a menu: A frame from your video can be a backdrop
    for your DVD's menu. Most video editing programs (but not Windows
    Movie Maker) let you pick a frame from the video in a couple of mouse
    clicks. Check the documentation for the specific process; many
    programs refer to this as a frame grab. Read "Polish Your Videos With
    a DVD Menu" for more ideas:
    http://www.pcworld.com/howto/article/0,aid,116868,tk,box,00.asp

    Use the highest quality settings: You might be tempted to use the
    higher compression settings since the resulting files require less
    disk space, allowing you to put more videos onto a single DVD--but
    you'll pay a big price in playback quality. Put less video on each
    disc, even if that means stretching a long movie over two discs.
    Alternatively, you could take it as a sign that your movie is too long
    and needs to be edited down. This means you, Kevin Costner.

    Put the movies on good discs: Employ discs that are made to last; keep
    them in their cases when they aren't in use, and store them in a cool,
    dry place. Browse Melissa Perenson's columns for valuable advice:

    "Picking the Right Media, Part 1"
    http://www.pcworld.com/howto/article/0,aid,120440,tk,box,00.asp

    "Picking the Right Media, Part 2"
    http://www.pcworld.com/howto/article/0,aid,120833,tk,box,00.asp

    "Ten Tips for Durable DVDs"
    http://www.pcworld.com/howto/article/0,aid,113716,tk,box,00.asp

    Make a nice label: It's no sweat--both Avery and Fellowes provide
    downloadable DVD-label design templates on their Web sites. And
    Melissa has lots of advice on this topic:

    "The Joy of Labeling"
    http://www.pcworld.com/reviews/article/0,aid,114423,tk,box,00.asp

    "Is Labeling Software Worth the Hassle?"
    http://www.pcworld.com/reviews/article/0,aid,114848,tk,box,00.asp

    Visit our Digital Entertainment for digital camcorder and
    video-editing software reviews:
    http://www.pcworld.com/resource/infocenter/0,ctrid,10,ic,DigitalEntertainment,tk,box,00.asp

    Have a question or comment? Write to Richard Baguley:
    makingmovies at pcworld.com

    Read Richard Baguley's "Making Movies" columns:
    http://www.pcworld.com/resource/columnist/0,colid,33,tk,bo,00.asp

    ====
    "I don't care (if I get booed). I don't know any of those people. As long as my kids tell me that they love me, I'm fine. My motto is, when people talk about me, I say, 'Who are they? They're not God.' If God was out there booing me, I'd be upset."
    -- Bonzi Wells, Sacramento Kings
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    Ablang, Dec 21, 2005
    #1
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