Best way to keep people off my PC?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by me@privacy.net, Feb 12, 2006.

  1. Guest

    People at work are using my workstation at night to
    surf the web

    What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    PC?

    Set bios password?
     
    , Feb 12, 2006
    #1
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  2. Spuds Guest

    On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:09:41 -0600, wrote:

    >People at work are using my workstation at night to
    >surf the web
    >
    >What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    >PC?
    >
    >Set bios password?


    Just a head's up. If you have an IT department, they'll draw and quarter you
    if they need to get on your machine and can't.
     
    Spuds, Feb 12, 2006
    #2
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  3. Dr.Crock Guest

    wrote:
    > People at work are using my workstation at night to
    > surf the web
    >
    > What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    > PC?
    >
    > Set bios password?


    Wipe shit all over the keyboard, that should prevent them
     
    Dr.Crock, Feb 12, 2006
    #3
  4. Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:,
    Spuds spewed forth:
    > On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:09:41 -0600, wrote:
    >
    >> People at work are using my workstation at night to
    >> surf the web
    >>
    >> What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    >> PC?
    >>
    >> Set bios password?

    >
    > Just a head's up. If you have an IT department, they'll draw and
    > quarter you if they need to get on your machine and can't.


    No doubt. My boss set a BIOS password on a laptop (really a good idea,
    actually). Then when he got the new one all set up, he didn't use the same
    password. So the old one sat around long enough that he forgot the old
    password, and now the laptop is spare parts.

    --
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success.
     
    Toolman Tim, Feb 12, 2006
    #4
  5. PC Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > People at work are using my workstation at night to
    > surf the web
    >
    > What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    > PC?
    >
    > Set bios password?




    Depends a bit on the environment.
    If you have an IT department liase with them about passwording your PC.

    If it's SOHO, just try a passworded screen saver in the startup folder.

    Paul.
     
    PC, Feb 12, 2006
    #5
  6. Vanguard Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > People at work are using my workstation at night to
    > surf the web
    >
    > What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    > PC?
    >
    > Set bios password?



    A BIOS password is one way as long as you secure the case to prevent
    physical entry (so the abuser cannot reset the BIOS using a jumper). If you
    set a BIOS password, use the same one as your domain login and inform your
    manager and IT dept.

    If you want to nail the abuser(s), attach a web cam and send the video
    traffic to another host to save the recording. Then get them fired for
    misuse of company property. Of course, the admins could see who was logging
    in and at what MAC address for the host to see who was logging in on your
    host.

    --
    __________________________________________________
    Post replies to the newsgroup. Share with others.
    For e-mail: Remove "NIX" and add "#VN" to Subject.
    __________________________________________________
     
    Vanguard, Feb 12, 2006
    #6
  7. Spuds Guest

    On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 18:07:56 -0800, "Toolman Tim" <>
    wrote:

    >In news:,
    >Spuds spewed forth:
    >> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:09:41 -0600, wrote:
    >>
    >>> People at work are using my workstation at night to
    >>> surf the web
    >>>
    >>> What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    >>> PC?
    >>>
    >>> Set bios password?

    >>
    >> Just a head's up. If you have an IT department, they'll draw and
    >> quarter you if they need to get on your machine and can't.

    >
    >No doubt. My boss set a BIOS password on a laptop (really a good idea,
    >actually). Then when he got the new one all set up, he didn't use the same
    >password. So the old one sat around long enough that he forgot the old
    >password, and now the laptop is spare parts.


    There are those who would say that an IT department should know how to clear a
    BIOS password, but that isn't the point. It's the time wasted doing this that
    could be spent on other things, like installing company licensed software on a
    manager's kid's PC.
     
    Spuds, Feb 12, 2006
    #7
  8. MG Guest

    > No doubt. My boss set a BIOS password on a laptop (really a good idea, actually). Then when he got the new one all set up, he
    > didn't use the same password. So the old one sat around long enough that he forgot the old password, and now the laptop is spare
    > parts.


    But won't the password be reset to nothing if the CMOS battery is removed?
     
    MG, Feb 12, 2006
    #8
  9. Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:,
    Spuds spewed forth:
    > On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 18:07:56 -0800, "Toolman Tim"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> In news:,
    >> Spuds spewed forth:
    >>> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:09:41 -0600, wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> People at work are using my workstation at night to
    >>>> surf the web
    >>>>
    >>>> What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    >>>> PC?
    >>>>
    >>>> Set bios password?
    >>>
    >>> Just a head's up. If you have an IT department, they'll draw and
    >>> quarter you if they need to get on your machine and can't.

    >>
    >> No doubt. My boss set a BIOS password on a laptop (really a good
    >> idea, actually). Then when he got the new one all set up, he didn't
    >> use the same password. So the old one sat around long enough that he
    >> forgot the old password, and now the laptop is spare parts.

    >
    > There are those who would say that an IT department should know how
    > to clear a BIOS password, but that isn't the point. It's the time
    > wasted doing this that could be spent on other things, like
    > installing company licensed software on a manager's kid's PC.


    This IT guy *does* know how to clear a BIOS password. But the *laptop* in
    question can't be cleared. It is not handled by CMOS but by custom
    proprietary systems specifically designed to PREVENT anyone from clearing
    the password. Just ask Dell. They gave me an 'override' password, but even
    that doesn't allow me to clear the old password or reset a new one. I can
    use the laptop. But the particular override password is extremely difficult
    to use/remember. Since these are now almost 4 years old, and were being
    phased out at the office this year, I didn't want to buy a new motherboard
    to get rid of the password. So it's being used for parts. Keyboard, hinges,
    etc.

    --
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success.
     
    Toolman Tim, Feb 12, 2006
    #9
  10. Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:,
    MG spewed forth:
    >> No doubt. My boss set a BIOS password on a laptop (really a good
    >> idea, actually). Then when he got the new one all set up, he didn't
    >> use the same password. So the old one sat around long enough that he
    >> forgot the old password, and now the laptop is spare parts.

    >
    > But won't the password be reset to nothing if the CMOS battery is
    > removed?


    Nope. See my reply to Spuds.

    --
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success.
     
    Toolman Tim, Feb 12, 2006
    #10
  11. JANA Guest

    Have the computer properly set up to only accept the users and their
    passwords that you want to use the machine. Another work around is to have a
    high quality keyswitch installed to not allow the computer to operate. Or,
    you can lock up the keyboard and mouse at night, thus the user will have to
    supply his own. Most people don't go around with keyboards and mice in their
    attaché case.

    --

    JANA
    _____


    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    People at work are using my workstation at night to
    surf the web

    What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    PC?

    Set bios password?
     
    JANA, Feb 12, 2006
    #11
  12. JANA Guest

    If it is a name brand lap top, you send it to the manufacture's service rep,
    they can unlock it for you.

    --

    JANA
    _____


    "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:3MwHf.1198$...
    In news:,
    Spuds spewed forth:
    > On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:09:41 -0600, wrote:
    >
    >> People at work are using my workstation at night to
    >> surf the web
    >>
    >> What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    >> PC?
    >>
    >> Set bios password?

    >
    > Just a head's up. If you have an IT department, they'll draw and
    > quarter you if they need to get on your machine and can't.


    No doubt. My boss set a BIOS password on a laptop (really a good idea,
    actually). Then when he got the new one all set up, he didn't use the same
    password. So the old one sat around long enough that he forgot the old
    password, and now the laptop is spare parts.

    --
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success.
     
    JANA, Feb 12, 2006
    #12
  13. Spuds Guest

    On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:28:23 -0800, "Toolman Tim" <>
    wrote:

    >In news:,
    >Spuds spewed forth:
    >> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 18:07:56 -0800, "Toolman Tim"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In news:,
    >>> Spuds spewed forth:
    >>>> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:09:41 -0600, wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> People at work are using my workstation at night to
    >>>>> surf the web
    >>>>>
    >>>>> What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    >>>>> PC?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Set bios password?
    >>>>
    >>>> Just a head's up. If you have an IT department, they'll draw and
    >>>> quarter you if they need to get on your machine and can't.
    >>>
    >>> No doubt. My boss set a BIOS password on a laptop (really a good
    >>> idea, actually). Then when he got the new one all set up, he didn't
    >>> use the same password. So the old one sat around long enough that he
    >>> forgot the old password, and now the laptop is spare parts.

    >>
    >> There are those who would say that an IT department should know how
    >> to clear a BIOS password, but that isn't the point. It's the time
    >> wasted doing this that could be spent on other things, like
    >> installing company licensed software on a manager's kid's PC.

    >
    >This IT guy *does* know how to clear a BIOS password. But the *laptop* in
    >question can't be cleared. It is not handled by CMOS but by custom
    >proprietary systems specifically designed to PREVENT anyone from clearing
    >the password. Just ask Dell. They gave me an 'override' password, but even
    >that doesn't allow me to clear the old password or reset a new one. I can
    >use the laptop. But the particular override password is extremely difficult
    >to use/remember. Since these are now almost 4 years old, and were being
    >phased out at the office this year, I didn't want to buy a new motherboard
    >to get rid of the password. So it's being used for parts. Keyboard, hinges,
    >etc.


    I have no doubt you do, Tim. I was referring to those who think that we IT
    droids essentially have nothing better to do. <g>

    Gotta admit, I didn't know about the Dell laptop BIOS PW thing. Don't know if
    that's an issue with ThinkPads, of which most of our laptop fleet is made up
    of. It's never came up, and I can't recall ever even seeing one with a power
    on password.
     
    Spuds, Feb 12, 2006
    #13
  14. Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:,
    Spuds spewed forth:
    > On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:28:23 -0800, "Toolman Tim"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> In news:,
    >> Spuds spewed forth:
    >>> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 18:07:56 -0800, "Toolman Tim"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In news:,
    >>>> Spuds spewed forth:
    >>>>> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:09:41 -0600, wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> People at work are using my workstation at night to
    >>>>>> surf the web
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    >>>>>> PC?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Set bios password?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Just a head's up. If you have an IT department, they'll draw and
    >>>>> quarter you if they need to get on your machine and can't.
    >>>>
    >>>> No doubt. My boss set a BIOS password on a laptop (really a good
    >>>> idea, actually). Then when he got the new one all set up, he didn't
    >>>> use the same password. So the old one sat around long enough that
    >>>> he forgot the old password, and now the laptop is spare parts.
    >>>
    >>> There are those who would say that an IT department should know how
    >>> to clear a BIOS password, but that isn't the point. It's the time
    >>> wasted doing this that could be spent on other things, like
    >>> installing company licensed software on a manager's kid's PC.

    >>
    >> This IT guy *does* know how to clear a BIOS password. But the
    >> *laptop* in question can't be cleared. It is not handled by CMOS but
    >> by custom proprietary systems specifically designed to PREVENT
    >> anyone from clearing the password. Just ask Dell. They gave me an
    >> 'override' password, but even that doesn't allow me to clear the old
    >> password or reset a new one. I can use the laptop. But the
    >> particular override password is extremely difficult to use/remember.
    >> Since these are now almost 4 years old, and were being phased out at
    >> the office this year, I didn't want to buy a new motherboard to get
    >> rid of the password. So it's being used for parts. Keyboard, hinges,
    >> etc.

    >
    > I have no doubt you do, Tim. I was referring to those who think that
    > we IT droids essentially have nothing better to do. <g>
    >
    > Gotta admit, I didn't know about the Dell laptop BIOS PW thing.
    > Don't know if that's an issue with ThinkPads, of which most of our
    > laptop fleet is made up of. It's never came up, and I can't recall
    > ever even seeing one with a power on password.


    Well, I can see why they did that. After all, too many people *do* know how
    to clear CMOS settings. I had to provide proof of ownership to Dell when I
    called before they would give me an override. And the override is based on
    the system service tag number, so it's useless on any other system. For my
    "general" users, I tell them to leave the passwords alone. But the
    boss...well, that's another story <g>. And really, since he has more
    confidential data on the computer than most users, if it got stolen, I
    certainly want it protected.

    The laptop is a 1.2GHz PIII, so it's due for 'retirement' anyway. But I
    usually have people at work wanting to purchase these used units.

    --
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success.
     
    Toolman Tim, Feb 12, 2006
    #14
  15. Spuds Guest

    On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 20:47:59 -0800, "Toolman Tim" <>
    wrote:

    >In news:,
    >Spuds spewed forth:
    >> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:28:23 -0800, "Toolman Tim"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In news:,
    >>> Spuds spewed forth:
    >>>> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 18:07:56 -0800, "Toolman Tim"
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> In news:,
    >>>>> Spuds spewed forth:
    >>>>>> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:09:41 -0600, wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> People at work are using my workstation at night to
    >>>>>>> surf the web
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    >>>>>>> PC?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Set bios password?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Just a head's up. If you have an IT department, they'll draw and
    >>>>>> quarter you if they need to get on your machine and can't.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> No doubt. My boss set a BIOS password on a laptop (really a good
    >>>>> idea, actually). Then when he got the new one all set up, he didn't
    >>>>> use the same password. So the old one sat around long enough that
    >>>>> he forgot the old password, and now the laptop is spare parts.
    >>>>
    >>>> There are those who would say that an IT department should know how
    >>>> to clear a BIOS password, but that isn't the point. It's the time
    >>>> wasted doing this that could be spent on other things, like
    >>>> installing company licensed software on a manager's kid's PC.
    >>>
    >>> This IT guy *does* know how to clear a BIOS password. But the
    >>> *laptop* in question can't be cleared. It is not handled by CMOS but
    >>> by custom proprietary systems specifically designed to PREVENT
    >>> anyone from clearing the password. Just ask Dell. They gave me an
    >>> 'override' password, but even that doesn't allow me to clear the old
    >>> password or reset a new one. I can use the laptop. But the
    >>> particular override password is extremely difficult to use/remember.
    >>> Since these are now almost 4 years old, and were being phased out at
    >>> the office this year, I didn't want to buy a new motherboard to get
    >>> rid of the password. So it's being used for parts. Keyboard, hinges,
    >>> etc.

    >>
    >> I have no doubt you do, Tim. I was referring to those who think that
    >> we IT droids essentially have nothing better to do. <g>
    >>
    >> Gotta admit, I didn't know about the Dell laptop BIOS PW thing.
    >> Don't know if that's an issue with ThinkPads, of which most of our
    >> laptop fleet is made up of. It's never came up, and I can't recall
    >> ever even seeing one with a power on password.

    >
    >Well, I can see why they did that. After all, too many people *do* know how
    >to clear CMOS settings. I had to provide proof of ownership to Dell when I
    >called before they would give me an override. And the override is based on
    >the system service tag number, so it's useless on any other system. For my
    >"general" users, I tell them to leave the passwords alone. But the
    >boss...well, that's another story <g>. And really, since he has more
    >confidential data on the computer than most users, if it got stolen, I
    >certainly want it protected.
    >
    >The laptop is a 1.2GHz PIII, so it's due for 'retirement' anyway. But I
    >usually have people at work wanting to purchase these used units.



    A sad scenario would be in a case where an individual bought a Dell, set a
    power on password, then promptly forgot it. If/when he went to sell the
    machine, it would be devalued, simply for the fact that any subsequent user
    would forever have to enter the cryptic bypass PW.

    I can't see why Dell would do that. All any thief would have to do, is simply
    pull the drive and install it on another box. Confidential data, if it could
    compromise a business, should be encrypted. Norton, many moons ago, used to
    make a simple executable that would allow you to encrypt any file, but I don't
    know whatever became of it. That was back in the era when Norton wrote tight
    code and simple but functional apps, but I digress.

    Laptop theft is rampant. We've lost countless laptops out of our corporate
    head office, in areas supposedly off-limits to outsiders. It got so bad that
    it is now a requirement to use a Belkin cable to secure units to desks, no
    excuses.
     
    Spuds, Feb 12, 2006
    #15
  16. Plato Guest

    wrote:
    >
    > People at work are using my workstation at night to
    > surf the web
    >
    > What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    > PC?
    >
    > Set bios password?


    Yes




    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Plato, Feb 12, 2006
    #16
  17. Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-02-12, <> wrote:
    > People at work are using my workstation at night to
    > surf the web
    >
    > What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    > PC?
    >
    > Set bios password?


    Talk to your IT dept.

    If this is a company machine, then it isn't 'yours' and you need to liaise
    with whoever is in charge of such things.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Feb 12, 2006
    #17
  18. why? Guest

    On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:09:41 -0600, wrote:

    >People at work are using my workstation at night to
    >surf the web
    >
    >What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    >PC?


    As you didn't mention OS / type of setup.

    If like our place there is a domain login with login/off auditing and
    proxy logs I wouldn't bother. Leave it to the security folks / log
    analysis.

    >Set bios password?


    A good start, although not if your IT dept doesn't know it however. Then
    again they should deal with it.

    Windows NT type domain , has allowed hours setting for server access, so
    if you have a proxy server and it doesn't allow access to groups / users
    at specific times.

    Me
     
    why?, Feb 12, 2006
    #18
  19. Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:,
    Spuds spewed forth:
    > On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 20:47:59 -0800, "Toolman Tim"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> In news:,
    >> Spuds spewed forth:
    >>> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:28:23 -0800, "Toolman Tim"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In news:,
    >>>> Spuds spewed forth:
    >>>>> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 18:07:56 -0800, "Toolman Tim"
    >>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> In news:,
    >>>>>> Spuds spewed forth:
    >>>>>>> On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 19:09:41 -0600, wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> People at work are using my workstation at night to
    >>>>>>>> surf the web
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> What's best way to keep anyone but me from using this
    >>>>>>>> PC?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Set bios password?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Just a head's up. If you have an IT department, they'll draw
    >>>>>>> and quarter you if they need to get on your machine and can't.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> No doubt. My boss set a BIOS password on a laptop (really a good
    >>>>>> idea, actually). Then when he got the new one all set up, he
    >>>>>> didn't use the same password. So the old one sat around long
    >>>>>> enough that he forgot the old password, and now the laptop is
    >>>>>> spare parts.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> There are those who would say that an IT department should know
    >>>>> how to clear a BIOS password, but that isn't the point. It's the
    >>>>> time wasted doing this that could be spent on other things, like
    >>>>> installing company licensed software on a manager's kid's PC.
    >>>>
    >>>> This IT guy *does* know how to clear a BIOS password. But the
    >>>> *laptop* in question can't be cleared. It is not handled by CMOS
    >>>> but by custom proprietary systems specifically designed to PREVENT
    >>>> anyone from clearing the password. Just ask Dell. They gave me an
    >>>> 'override' password, but even that doesn't allow me to clear the
    >>>> old password or reset a new one. I can use the laptop. But the
    >>>> particular override password is extremely difficult to
    >>>> use/remember. Since these are now almost 4 years old, and were
    >>>> being phased out at the office this year, I didn't want to buy a
    >>>> new motherboard to get rid of the password. So it's being used for
    >>>> parts. Keyboard, hinges, etc.
    >>>
    >>> I have no doubt you do, Tim. I was referring to those who think
    >>> that we IT droids essentially have nothing better to do. <g>
    >>>
    >>> Gotta admit, I didn't know about the Dell laptop BIOS PW thing.
    >>> Don't know if that's an issue with ThinkPads, of which most of our
    >>> laptop fleet is made up of. It's never came up, and I can't recall
    >>> ever even seeing one with a power on password.

    >>
    >> Well, I can see why they did that. After all, too many people *do*
    >> know how to clear CMOS settings. I had to provide proof of ownership
    >> to Dell when I called before they would give me an override. And the
    >> override is based on the system service tag number, so it's useless
    >> on any other system. For my "general" users, I tell them to leave
    >> the passwords alone. But the boss...well, that's another story <g>.
    >> And really, since he has more confidential data on the computer than
    >> most users, if it got stolen, I certainly want it protected.
    >>
    >> The laptop is a 1.2GHz PIII, so it's due for 'retirement' anyway.
    >> But I usually have people at work wanting to purchase these used
    >> units.

    >
    >
    > A sad scenario would be in a case where an individual bought a Dell,
    > set a power on password, then promptly forgot it. If/when he went to
    > sell the machine, it would be devalued, simply for the fact that any
    > subsequent user would forever have to enter the cryptic bypass PW.


    There are frequently laptops on eBay with that problem. I don't set the BIOS
    password on my laptop unless I'm traveling. Then of course, I don't use a
    password I'd be likely to forget either ;) It's mostly just to keep "snoops"
    out - my personal data files of confidential nature are all password
    protected. And while that's not as secure as encryption, it's enough to keep
    a motel maid from peeking around in Quicken...

    > I can't see why Dell would do that. All any thief would have to do,
    > is simply pull the drive and install it on another box. Confidential
    > data, if it could compromise a business, should be encrypted.


    Ah! But the DRIVE isn't accessible either. They've got the drive locked by a
    BIOS password as well. If the drive is put in a different computer it isn't
    readable. At least, that's how I understood it - I've never tested it in a
    non-Dell system.

    > Norton, many moons ago, used to make a simple executable that would
    > allow you to encrypt any file, but I don't know whatever became of
    > it. That was back in the era when Norton wrote tight code and simple
    > but functional apps, but I digress.


    Oh, how I loved Norton Tools. I still have a copy of them here somewhere.
    And in fact, I still use the batch file enhancer at work.

    > Laptop theft is rampant. We've lost countless laptops out of our
    > corporate head office, in areas supposedly off-limits to outsiders.
    > It got so bad that it is now a requirement to use a Belkin cable to
    > secure units to desks, no excuses.


    Makes good sense to me. Of course, a serious theif wouldn't be stopped by
    that, but your average guy walking around the office isn't carrying cable
    cutters <g>! We've been lucky. Even when our office was broken in to a few
    years back, no computers were stolen. It looked like it was kids looking for
    desk-drawer change and stuff.

    But I did have my laptop stolen out of the trunk of a car in LA a couple
    years ago. Even though my data was all in password protected files, I still
    canceled all my credit cards, changed bank accounts, changed the
    logins/passwords of my online connections. It was a real PITA.

    --
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success.
     
    Toolman Tim, Feb 12, 2006
    #19
  20. Spuds Guest

    On Sun, 12 Feb 2006 08:18:34 -0800, "Toolman Tim" <>
    wrote:

    >In news:,
    >Spuds spewed forth:


    >> A sad scenario would be in a case where an individual bought a Dell,
    >> set a power on password, then promptly forgot it. If/when he went to
    >> sell the machine, it would be devalued, simply for the fact that any
    >> subsequent user would forever have to enter the cryptic bypass PW.

    >
    >There are frequently laptops on eBay with that problem. I don't set the BIOS
    >password on my laptop unless I'm traveling. Then of course, I don't use a
    >password I'd be likely to forget either ;) It's mostly just to keep "snoops"
    >out - my personal data files of confidential nature are all password
    >protected. And while that's not as secure as encryption, it's enough to keep
    >a motel maid from peeking around in Quicken...
    >
    >> I can't see why Dell would do that. All any thief would have to do,
    >> is simply pull the drive and install it on another box. Confidential
    >> data, if it could compromise a business, should be encrypted.

    >
    >Ah! But the DRIVE isn't accessible either. They've got the drive locked by a
    >BIOS password as well. If the drive is put in a different computer it isn't
    >readable. At least, that's how I understood it - I've never tested it in a
    >non-Dell system.


    Well _that's_ interesting. I'd sure like to know if that's indeed the case.

    >> Norton, many moons ago, used to make a simple executable that would
    >> allow you to encrypt any file, but I don't know whatever became of
    >> it. That was back in the era when Norton wrote tight code and simple
    >> but functional apps, but I digress.

    >
    >Oh, how I loved Norton Tools. I still have a copy of them here somewhere.
    >And in fact, I still use the batch file enhancer at work.

    <snip>

    Oh yeah, BE. I used FI for years, to add file descriptions, until I finally
    wrote my own app.
    At one time they'd all fit on a floppy. How times have changed.
     
    Spuds, Feb 12, 2006
    #20
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